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Astronomers Without Borders - Home

Astronomers Without Borders - Home

The Fermi Paradox - Wait But Why PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.) Everyone feels something when they’re in a really good starry place on a really good starry night and they look up and see this: Some people stick with the traditional, feeling struck by the epic beauty or blown away by the insane scale of the universe. Personally, I go for the old “existential meltdown followed by acting weird for the next half hour.” Physicist Enrico Fermi felt something too—”Where is everybody?” A really starry sky seems vast—but all we’re looking at is our very local neighborhood. Galaxy image: Nick Risinger When confronted with the topic of stars and galaxies, a question that tantalizes most humans is, “Is there other intelligent life out there?” As many stars as there are in our galaxy (100 – 400 billion), there are roughly an equal number of galaxies in the observable universe—so for every star in the colossal Milky Way, there’s a whole galaxy out there. 1. 2.

Journal of Nuclear Physics Astronomy Day The next Astronomy Day this year is May 10, 2014 and on October 4, 2014. Local astronomical societies, planetariums, museums, and observatories will be sponsoring public viewing sessions, presentations, workshops, and other activities to increase public awareness about astronomy and our wonderful universe. List of Events for May 2014 List of Events for October 2014 Add your event to the above list of all Astronomy Day sites For more information contact: Astronomy Day Headquarters Gary Beckstrom Assistant Astronomy Day Coordinator 1717 Montclair Avenue Flint, MI 48503 e-mail: gary-at-BeckstromObservatory-dot-com Latest Astronomy Day Information Astronomy Day Fact Sheet Astronomy Day Co sponsors FREE Astronomy Day Handbook to plan events Astronomy Day Award Application

Free Online Student Organizer | Schoolbinder Physicists Discover Geometry Underlying Particle Physics Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality. “This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has been following the work. The revelation that particle interactions, the most basic events in nature, may be consequences of geometry significantly advances a decades-long effort to reformulate quantum field theory, the body of laws describing elementary particles and their interactions. Interactions that were previously calculated with mathematical formulas thousands of terms long can now be described by computing the volume of the corresponding jewel-like “amplituhedron,” which yields an equivalent one-term expression. Locality is the notion that particles can interact only from adjoining positions in space and time.

Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers 8 math talks to blow your mind Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways? How big is infinity? Arthur Benjamin does “Mathemagic” A whole team of calculators is no match for Arthur Benjamin, as he does astounding mental math in the blink of an eye. Scott Rickard: The beautiful math behind the ugliest music What makes a piece of music beautiful? Margaret Wertheim: The beautiful math of coralThe intricate forms of a coral reef can only be expressed through hyperbolic geometry — and the only way humans can model it is by crocheting!

Helioseismology Active Learning Exercises in Planetary and Solar Astronomy Copyright 1996 National Optical Astronomy Observatory Volume 1, Number 1 NEW! Download an Updated Version of this module in PDF format. This lesson module was written as part of a NASA IDEA grant titled Active Learning Exercises in Planetary and Solar Astronomy for K-3 Students. This module was developed by NSO astronomer Dr. We used the following 5 color slides for this lesson; Click the images below for a larger, more detailed image [28 to 84K]. Slide 1: Image of actual solar surface Slide 2: Computer image of slice through sun showing how sound bounces inside sun Slide 3: Computer image of cutaway of sun showing up and down pattern of one solar musical note Slide 4: Image of actual solar surface showing the up and down pattern of all 10 million solar musical notes together at one instant Slide 5: Image of the "keyboard" of solar music. Today we would like to teach you about solar music. Have any of you ever heard the sun? Lower Higher

Astronomy Technology Today Magazine You Can Easily Learn 100 TED Talks Lessons In 5 Minutes Which Most People Need 70 Hours For The other week I watched 70 hours of TED talks; short, 18-minute talks given by inspirational leaders in the fields of Technology,Entertainment, and Design (TED). I watched 296 talks in total, and I recently went through the list of what I watched, weeded out the crappy and boring talks, and created a list of the 100 best things I learned ! This article isn’t entirely about productivity, but I guarantee you’ll learn a thing or two. Here are 100 incredible things I learned watching 70 hours of TED talks last week! Productivity 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Here are three other productivity experiments I’ve done recently: Meditating for 35 hours over 7 days; using my smartphone for only an hour a day for three months; living in total reclusion for 10 days. More TED Talks lessons: Speak like a Pro- 15 lessons learned from watching TED TALKS Becoming a better human 23, 24, 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35, 36, 37, 38, 39. 40, 41. 42.

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