background preloader

All Alone in the Night - Time-lapse footage of the Earth as seen from the ISS

All Alone in the Night - Time-lapse footage of the Earth as seen from the ISS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FG0fTKAqZ5g

Related:  La répartition de la population mondiale et ses dynamiquesEarth & SpaceAmazonia e a Seca de SP

Earth - Your life on earth Explore BBC Earth's unique interactive, personalised just to you. Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space. Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted. Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered. And see how the BBC was there with you, capturing some of the most amazing wonders of the natural world.

Mars’ Atmosphere Stripped by Solar Winds, NASA Says This video is not currently supported on your browser. Advertisement Continue reading the main story Video New simulation predicts higher average Earth temperatures by 2050 than other models (PhysOrg.com) -- Over the past several years, researchers have built a variety of computer simulations created to predict Earth’s climate in the future. Most recently, most models have suggested that over the next fifty years, we’ll see an average worldwide rise in temperature of perhaps 1°C. Now a new group of simulations, using the combined computing power of thousands of personal computers, says that number is too low, and that we might see temperatures rise as much as 3°C, which would of course, be a far more serious situation. The simulations, run by climateprediction.net in conjunction with the BBC Climate Change Experiment, resulted in predictions of a rise in temperature ranging from 1.4°C to 3.0°C by 2050. The large team involved in the project has published their findings in Nature Geoscience.

Perigee "Super Moon" On May 5-6 Perigee "Super Moon" On May 5-6 May 2, 2012: The full Moon has a reputation for trouble. It raises high tides, it makes dogs howl, it wakes you up in the middle of the night with beams of moonlight stealing through drapes. Astronomers watch black hole burp after eating a star Scientists have for the first time witnessed a black hole swallow a star and then quickly eject a flare of stellar debris moving at nearly light speed. Astrophysicists tracked the star—about the size of our sun—as it shifted from its customary path, slipped into the gravitational pull of a supermassive black hole, and was sucked in, says Sjoert van Velzen, a Hubble fellow at Johns Hopkins University. “These events are extremely rare,” says van Velzen, lead author of the study published in the journal Science. “It’s the first time we see everything from the stellar destruction followed by the launch of a conical outflow, also called a jet, and we watched it unfold over several months.” Black holes are areas of space so dense that irresistible gravitational force stops the escape of matter, gas, and even light, rendering them invisible and creating the effect of a void in the fabric of space. [Giant black hole in normal galaxy breaks the rules]

Al Gore and Framing or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Scientific Data – The Island of Doubt We can’t stop arguing about framing, can we? I’ve been pondering the subject much of late, especially while I waited these past four days for Duke Power to get us back on the grid following Sunday’s windstorm, and I think I’ve got something relevant to contribute. I know Matt Nisbet has got lots of social science research that suggests people’s eyes glaze over when a scientist uses data to explain something, but that’s not my experience. Which is: As some may recall, I’m a member of The Climate Project, a team of some 1,000 volunteers that Al Gore trained to present his Keynote/PowerPoint slide show on climate change. I’ve done it half a dozen times now, to a wide variety of audiences, including high school students and town councilors.

This Is What Supercontinent Pangea Looks Like Mapped With Modern Borders Imagine traveling from China to Antarctica, crossing through Canada, Brazil and India – without setting foot in any water. Unfortunately, you’ve missed your chance long ago as the supercontinent of Pangea no longer exists. But thanks to the illustrative talents of Massimo Pietrobon, you can see how Pangea may have looked before the epic landmass started ripping itself apart 200 million years ago to form the continents and countries of the world today. Image Credit: Massimo Pietrobon

uk.businessinsider The universe is so vast it's almost impossible to picture what it might look like crammed into one field of view. But musician Pablo Carlos Budassi managed to do it by combining logarithmic maps of the universe from Princeton and images from NASA. He created the image below that shows the observable universe in one disc. Our sun and solar system are at the very center of the image, followed by the outer ring of our Milky Way galaxy, the Perseus arm of the Milky Way, a ring of other nearby galaxies like Andromeda, the rest of the cosmic web, cosmic microwave background radiation leftover from the big bang, and finally a ring of plasma also generated by the big bang: Pablo Carlos Budassi

businessinsider We got a present from the Juan de Fuca Plate, which is subducting under the North American Plate: a slow earthquake! Did you even know an earthquake could be slow? We're used to thinking of earthquakes as events that happen over seconds to a few minutes and produce a lot of shaking, but some earthquakes actually mosey along over hours or days, their trembling so gentle only seismometers can recognize it. One of these earthquakes started in the Cascadia Subduction Zone on December 21st and has been making its slow way south from Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada ever since. Shelley Chestler at the Pacific Seismic Network has an excellent article on it. It's a feast of helpful illustrations and a clear explanation of what's going on, and I encourage you to read it in full if you want to know more about what's going on around one of the most dangerous fault zones in North America.

Concern Over Catastrophic Methane Release — Overburden, Plumes, Eruptions, and Large Ocean Craters The amount of methane in the Arctic hydrates alone is estimated as 400 times more than the global atmospheric CH4 burden. The question is timescale of the methane liberation: gradual, abrupt, or something in between. Satellite monitoring of methane over the Arctic Ocean is necessary. — Dr. Leonid Yerganov Depending on who you listen to, it’s the end of the world, or it isn’t.

Related:  Musique FilmsPOPULATION DISTRIBUTIONNASA