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Space Zen: Will Humans' Brains Change During Travel in Outer Space? -A Galaxy Insight

Space Zen: Will Humans' Brains Change During Travel in Outer Space? -A Galaxy Insight
In February, 1971, Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell experienced the little understood phenomenon sometimes called the “Overview Effect”. He describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness. Without warning, he says, a feeing of bliss, timelessness, and connectedness began to overwhelm him. Rusty Schweikart experienced it on March 6th 1969 during a spacewalk outside his Apollo 9 vehicle: “When you go around the Earth in an hour and a half, you begin to recognize that your identity is with that whole thing. Their experiences, along with dozens of other similar experiences described by other astronauts, intrigue scientists who study the brain. Andy Newberg, a neuroscientist/physician with a background in spacemedicine, is learning how to identify the markers of someone who hasexperienced space travel. Newberg's first test subject will not be an astronaut, but rather a civilian. “We had not had, in science, a definition of consciousness. Related:  Space StatusNew Earth Space

Astronomers Get First Peek at Atmosphere of a "Super-Earth" Exoplanet Someday in the coming years, if astronomers finally succeed in locating a virtual Earth twin outside the solar system—a tiny dot of a world at a temperate, life-enabling distance from a sunlike star—the achievement will hardly be cause for resting on observational laurels. Instead another race will begin: to characterize the planet and its atmosphere and to determine if the world is truly habitable or, tantalizingly, if it is already inhabited by some extraterrestrial life-form. In the meantime, astronomers are honing their techniques on the closest thing available—so-called super-Earths, just a few times the mass of our own planet, which are too hot to be habitable but are interesting in their own right. The few known super-Earths whose orbits are fortuitously aligned so that they transit—pass in front of their host star—from Earth's vantage point provide a unique laboratory for planetary investigations.

Are We Really All Made of Stars? | Cosmos, Moby’s Song ‘We Are All Made of Stars’, Universe & Solar System | Life's Little Mysteries The theory that everyone and everything on Earth contains minuscule star particles dates back further than Moby's popular 2002 song "We Are All Made of Stars." In the early 1980s, astronomer Carl Sagan hosted and narrated a 13-part television series called "Cosmos" that aired on PBS. On the show, Sagan thoroughly explained many science-related topics, including Earth's history, evolution, the origin of life and the solar system. "We are a way for the universe to know itself. His statement sums up the fact that the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms in our bodies, as well as atoms of all other heavy elements, were created in previous generations of stars over 4.5 billion years ago. "All organic matter containing carbon was produced originally in stars," Impey told Life's Little Mysteries. How star stuff got to Earth When it has exhausted its supply of hydrogen, it can die in a violent explostion, called a nova. "It's a well-tested theory," Impey said. Cosmic connections Got a question?

The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond | 2012 and Earthchanges News events Gini coefficient Gini coefficient of national income distribution around the world. This is based on 1989 to 2009 data, estimated by the CIA. Some are pre-tax and transfer, others post-tax income. The Gini coefficient (also known as the Gini index or Gini ratio) (/dʒini/) is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income distribution of a nation's residents. The Gini coefficient measures the inequality among values of a frequency distribution (for example levels of income). There are some issues in interpreting a Gini coefficient. Definition[edit] Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The graph shows that the Gini coefficient is equal to the area marked A divided by the sum of the areas marked A and B. that is, Gini = A / (A + B). The Gini coefficient is usually defined mathematically based on the Lorenz curve, which plots the proportion of the total income of the population (y axis) that is cumulatively earned by the bottom x% of the population (see diagram). where and

Giant Ribbon Discovered at the Edge of the Solar System + Play Audio | + Download Audio | + Join mailing list October 15, 2009: For years, researchers have known that the solar system is surrounded by a vast bubble of magnetism. Called the "heliosphere," it springs from the sun and extends far beyond the orbit of Pluto, providing a first line of defense against cosmic rays and interstellar clouds that try to enter our local space. Although the heliosphere is huge and literally fills the sky, it emits no light and no one has actually seen it. Until now. NASA's IBEX (Interstellar Boundary Explorer) spacecraft has made the first all-sky maps of the heliosphere and the results have taken researchers by surprise. Above: IBEX's all-sky map of energetic neutral atom emission reveals a bright filament of unknown origin. "This is a shocking new result," says IBEX principal investigator Dave McComas of the Southwest Research Institute. Although the ribbon looks bright in the IBEX map, it does not glow in any conventional sense. Stay tuned for updates.

Einstein for Everyone Einstein for Everyone Nullarbor Press 2007revisions 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 Copyright 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 John D. Norton Published by Nullarbor Press, 500 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 with offices in Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15222 All Rights Reserved John D. An advanced sequel is planned in this series:Einstein for Almost Everyone 2 4 6 8 9 7 5 3 1 ePrinted in the United States of America no trees were harmed web*bookTM This book is a continuing work in progress. January 1, 2015. Preface For over a decade I have taught an introductory, undergraduate class, "Einstein for Everyone," at the University of Pittsburgh to anyone interested enough to walk through door. With each new offering of the course, I had the chance to find out what content worked and which of my ever so clever pedagogical inventions were failures. At the same time, my lecture notes have evolved. This text owes a lot to many. i i i

LUNAR LIGHTS ON A HOLLOW MOON? Nevertheless, official NASA transcripts and blatant censorship of audio transmissions don't get any more ominous. Over the past year, I have discovered that there are many mysteries in which NASA and the moon share. I've already provided some evidence of NASA obscuring certain elements during the Apollo Missions (more below) - but were they already aware and prepared for spooky things being seen or heard on the moon before the Apollo missions were even launched? Strange lights and objects have been recorded on our moon for hundreds of years. The classical Greek philosopher, mathematician and scientist Plato also reported anomalous lights on the moon sometime around 400 BC. So could great historical minds like Sir William Herschel have been correct? There are several official NASA photos taken throughout it's lunar expeditions which often depict some extremely large, artificial-looking, structures on the lunar surface. In 1962, NASA scientist Dr. Indeed it was. How do I know this?

Computer Physics Lab Space Weather – implications for Planet Earth and Humankind The Mediasite presentation cannot be played back. The requested presentation content can be played using the following plugins:WindowsMedia, Silverlight, Html5 We have detected that your browser supports the following plugins:None

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