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Earth...Just A Click Away

Earth...Just A Click Away
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NASA Earth Observatory : Home Earth Earth Earth is a complex, dynamic system we do not yet fully understand. The Earth system, like the human body, comprises diverse components that interact in complex ways. We need to understand the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and biosphere as a single connected system. This is a composite image of the North African Continent. A major component of NASA’s Earth Science Division is a coordinated series of satellite and airborne missions for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. The Foundational missions are those missions in development at the time the decadal survey was published and include CLARREO, Aquarius, Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP), Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM).

Earth GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE from JPL Your planet is changing. We're on it. Our planet is changing. Click here to see how your planet is changing. EARTH IMAGES from the JPL Photojournal NASA Spacecraft Sees Stark Effects of California Drought on Agriculture Stark effects of a California drought on agriculture can be seen clearly in these two February images acquired by NASA's Landsat 8 in 2014 (left) and NASA's Terra spacecraft in 2003 (right). Read more | | More Earth images Explore Earth satellites in 3D "Eyes on the Earth" is a 3-D visualization experience that lets users "fly along" with NASA's fleet of Earth science missions and observe climate data from a global perspective in an immersive, real-time environment. View interactive Earth Observing Missions Active Cavity Irradiance Monitor Satellite Monitors total sun energy that reaches Earth. › Instrument home page Earth Science Airborne Program Utilizing remote sensing instruments for suborbital studies. › Mission home page

on reserve Plate Tectonics The Tectonic Globe™ The Plate Tectonic Globe™ The Plate Tectonic Globe™ is a globe unlike any other currently on the market. Its unique hand-crafted design illustrates clearly and accurately Earth's crustal tectonic features in vivid relief. The Plate Tectonic Globe™ captures the essence of Earth's dynamic character by depicting tectonic plate boundaries at mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, and continental collision zones. Other distinguishing characteristics of The Plate Tectonic Globe™ include raised and indented continental shelves, terrestrial and sea-floor topography, major transform faults, island chains, island arcs, and the relative thickness of continental and oceanic crust - all engineered in hand-sculpted relief. Aside from its unique aesthetic qualities, the tactility of our Plate Tectonic Globe makes it ideal for developing an understanding of Earth's tectonic nature by making it fun to explore the surface of the planet in a hands-on, minds-on way.

Extreme Weather Photo Contest Winners | Precipitation Measurement Missions Thank you to everyone who submitted photos to the first installment of our GPM Extreme Weather Photo Competition. We loved all of your entries and thoroughly appreciate your participation! The GPM Photo Competition Committee is happy to announce our top 5 picks. We’ll be sending the submitters NASA bags and GPM stickers. Please stay tuned for additional contests and activities. Ormond Shelf, by Jason Weingart Date and Location: May 15, 2012 Ormond Beach, Florida How this Photo Was Taken: “I'm a photography student at the University of Central Florida. I have shot many storms from the same spot this photo was taken, and I almost drove by to get a different vantage point, but something told me to just stop at my spot. The storm actually pushed back on shore as it moved south, and then became strong enough for tornado warnings on three separate occasions. Fun Fact: A shelf cloud is a type of arcus cloud with a wedge shape. About Photographer Jason Weingart: Thunderstorm, by Grant Petty

to reclass Precipitation Measurement Missions | An international partnership to understand precipitation and its impact on humankind. Total Lunar Eclipse This Weekend—Last One Until 2014 This weekend sky-watchers across most of the globe will have the chance to watch at least some of the last total lunar eclipse until 2014. The entire lunar eclipse will be visible in East Asia, Australia, and the far western portion of North America that includes Alaska and Canada's Yukon and Northwest Territories. The spectacle will last nearly three and a half hours, starting on Saturday at 4:45 a.m. Pacific Time. Totality—when the full moon will be completely blocked from direct sunlight—will start at 6:05 a.m. Part of the eclipse will be visible in Europe and Africa at moonrise, in the evening, said Raminder Singh Samra, an astronomer at the H.R. "Meanwhile, observers across the Pacific region of North America will get to see the sky show low in the western horizon at moonset, in the early morning," he said.

Datasets | Science On a Sphere Playlist Builder ../ftp_mirror/atmosphere/lightning/media/thumbnail_small.jpg Annual Lightning Flash Rate Map dataset.php?id=6 Annual Lightning Flash Rate Map Description Before scientists had satellites to detect and measure lightning frequency, it was thought that there were globally 100 lightning flashes per second, an estimate that dates back to 1925. It is clear from this map that the distribution of lightning flashes around the world is uneven. Notable Features Highest lightning flash frequency is 159 flashes per year in Central Africa Florida has the highest flash frequency in the United States The color variation indicates the flash frequency according to the color bar Use lighting Details Media Preview Interactive Sphere View Movie .. How Far Away is the Horizon? | Life's Little Mysteries On a clear day, you can see for miles and miles and miles. The old saying turns out to be just about true. For a six-foot tall person, the horizon is a little more than 3 miles (5 km) away. Geometry tells us that the distance of the horizon – i.e. the farthest point the eye can see before Earth curves out beneath our view – depends simply on the height of the observer. Add the effect of refraction, which bends rays of light as they pass through the atmosphere, and the horizon is even farther. Plus, since clouds hover above ground level, they can be seen to farther distances than features on Earth's surface. But just as weather sometimes aids our view, it can also hinder it.

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