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Recently added - word meanings

Recently added - word meanings
About this site The English language is forever changing. New words appear; old ones fall out of use or change their meanings. World Wide Words tries to record at least some part of this shifting wordscape by featuring new words, word histories, the background to words in the news, and the curiosities of native English speech. This is the archive of pieces that have appeared in the free newsletter. Weekly issues include much more than appears here, including discussion by readers, serendipitous encounters with unfamiliar language, and tongue-in-cheek tut-tuttings at errors perpetrated by sloppy writers.

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The case of the missing “u”s in American English Before you consciously became aware of your decision to read this article, your brain was already making the necessary preparations to click the link. There are a few crucial milliseconds between the moment when you’re consciously aware of a plan to act, and the moment you take action. This brief window is thought by some scientists to be the moment in time when we can exercise free will.

Fossil word A fossil word is a word that is generally obsolete but remains in currency because it is contained within an idiom still in use.[1][2] Fossil status can also occur for word senses and for phrases. An example for a word sense is navy in merchant navy, which means 'commercial fleet' (although that sense of navy is obsolete elsewhere). An example for a phrase is in point ('relevant'), which is retained in the larger phrases case in point (also case on point in the legal context) and in point of fact but is not otherwise used outside of a legal context. English language examples[edit] See also[edit] Take Our Word For It Issue 93 From Caroline: I know fork is such a commonly used word, but it is so weird. If you say it a lot, it's actually a really funny word.

The World's Most Spoken Languages And Where They Are Spoken This beautifully illustrated infographic (above), designed by South China Morning Post’s graphics director Alberto Lucas Lopéz, shows the most spoken known languages in the world and where they’re spoken by the 6.3 billion people included in the study. Based on records collated from the database Ethnologue, the infographic illustrates the wide-ranging facts and figures of the world’s living languages catalogued since 1951. “There are at least 7,102 known languages alive in the world today.

9 Websites You Can Use to Learn a Foreign Language - StumbleUpon Traveling is a great way to see a country and learn about the people who live there. But if you really want to learn what makes them tick than you need to learn their language. Immersing yourself in a new language can seem like a daunting task.

Names for the Wind Abroholos: a squall frequent from May through August between Cabo de Sao Tome and Cabo Frio on the coast of Brazil. Aejej in Morocco: a whirlwind in the desert. Aeolus: regent of the winds in Greek mythology. Syllables, Scrabble Letters, and Picking Brand Names - Rich Barton The Completely Ownable, “Made-Up” Consumer Brand Wins Long Term I wrote this as a private email in 2006 and just refreshed for the blog “Should we call our site something literal or should we make up a new word?”

The secret language of South Asia’s transgender community — Quartz In South Asia, there is a hidden language known only to the region’s hijra community. Found in Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh, the hijra are an old and marginalized group, whose members identify as men born with the souls of women. Hijras call themselves she-males and effigies, as well as kwaja sera, or the “guards of the harem,” a title that recalls their historical role serving monarchs in the region. These days, the hijra are known as performers and panhandlers. What few know about them, however, is that they are the keepers of many secrets, including the centuries-old language of Hijra Farsi. “It’s importance for our people that when we want to talk to our siblings and others from our household…we speak in our language and others won’t know what we’re saying,” Deemi, a hijra living in the Pakistani city of Lahore, explained to Muftah.

75 Free Language Learning Resources Online Whether you’re trying to learn English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, Italian –you get the picture – it’s good to get free help along the way. Luckily, there are tons of free online resources out there. Here are 75 to get you started … 1. 101Languages.net – Learn basics like vowels, consonants, phrases and vocabulary for various languages like Arabic, Bambara, Cebuano, Estonian, Icelandic, Latvian and Serbian. 2. 123TeachMe.com – 123TeachMe offers free learning materials, including games, quizzes, vocabulary builders, mp3 study lists, RSS vocabulary lists and more for adults and children. 3.

"Investigating international English from a British viewpoint." by macopa May 14

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