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Shakespearean Insulter

Shakespearean Insulter
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Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. For many English-speakers, the following phrases are familiar enough to be considered common expressions, proverbs, and/or clichés. I compiled these from multiple sources online in 2003. How many of these are true coinages by "the Bard", and how many are simply the earliest written attestations of a word or words already in use, I can't tell you. A few words are first attested in Shakespeare and seem to have caused extra problems for the typesetters. The popular book Coined by Shakespeare acknowledges that it is presenting first attestations rather than certain inventions. Words like "anchovy", "bandit", and "zany" are just first attestations of loan-words. Right now I'm in the process of referencing these. scalpel_blade@yahoo.com

Futility Closet World Wide Words: Recently added How To Be A Successful Evil Overlord How to be a Successful Evil Overlord by Peter Anspach Being an Evil Overlord seems to be a good career choice. It pays well, there are all sorts of perks and you can set your own hours. The Top 100 Things I'd Do If I Ever Became An Evil Overlord My Legions of Terror will have helmets with clear Plexiglas visors, not face concealing ones. Norm Goldblatt A Quick Guide to Reading Shakespeare Probably the number one complaint about reading Shakespeare is that it doesn't always read like "normal" English. It's a natural and legitimate accusation. Shakespeare wrote for an audience over 400 years ago. Think about how word meanings and expressions change over a relatively short time; four centuries bring with them a lot of alterations. For instance, the history of literary English is the history of invasions, with Celtic supplanted by Anglo-Saxon, which was usurped by Norman French (and accentuated with Latin). The Elizabethan era was a particularly volatile growth spurt in the English language. So how can a reader today bridge that gap between then and now? Word Usage First and foremost, there have been numerous vocabulary changes in English since Shakespeare was writing. Grammar This is where the flexibility of Shakespeare's English is often most apparent. Wordplay Some of the most difficult passages of Shakespeare occur when the Bard is purposely playing with language.

Gunpoint After three years of working in my weekends, Gunpoint is out! Try it first, then if it works OK and you like it, buy it below! What are these fancy editions? They’re fancy! You can get all three from Steam or from here, and you can upgrade to any of them later. Gunpoint: Special Edition Gunpoint: a 2D stealth game about rewiring things and punching people.The Soundtrack: includes all of the game’s noir-inspired spy music in high quality MP3 format.Developer Commentary: when enabled, you’ll find little sprites of Gunpoint’s developers on every mission. Gunpoint: Exclusive Edition Gunpoint: a 2D stealth game about rewiring things and punching people.The Soundtrack: includes all of the game’s noir-inspired spy music in high quality MP3 format.Developer Commentary: when enabled, you’ll find little sprites of Gunpoint’s developers on every mission. Special Edition Extras If you already have the base game, you can buy the extras from these editions separately: Exclusive Edition Extras Note!

A-Z of Unusual Words - The Project Twins Bold graphics and visual wit are used to interpret and represent a collection of strange, unusual and lost words. These images explore the meaning behind the words, which are sometimes even more strange or unusual. This series of work has been exhibited during Design Week Dublin 2011 and has been featured and reviewed on various blogs and magazines including Brainpickings, The Huffington Post and Design Taxi. Awarded a Merit in the 3X3 Proshow and featured in 3X3 Illustration Annual 2012. Prints are available in our online shop. 50cm X 70cm Original Giclee Print on Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Rag, 310 gsm, bright whiteEdition Size – 10 (signed and numbered) Acersecomic: A person whose hair has never been cut. Biblioclasm: The practice of destroying, often ceremoniously, books or other written material and media. Cacodemonomania: The pathological belief that one is inhabited by an evil spirit. Dactylion: An anatomical landmark located at the tip of the middle finger.

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Brian Malow | Earth's Premier Science Comedian | Science Co In Search of Shakespeare . The "Punny" Language of Shakespeare Introduction One of the most difficult challenges of studying Shakespeare is breaking the language barrier. There are several factors that often confuse the reader about the language of Shakespeare: the use of obsolete words, the order of sentence wording, and puns that depended on the meaning, usage, and pronunciation of words. For the first time reader of Shakespeare, the text may seem confusing and hard to translate, but it is important to understand that Shakespeare did indeed write in English, just a slightly different version of what we consider to be modern English. By learning about some of the Early Modern English word meanings, sentence structure, and puns students will be able to understand and enjoy the genius and humor in Shakespeare's work. Students will enjoy trying their hand at creating their own puns and finding puns in modern literature. Objectives Estimated Time Three 45-minute class periods Materials Procedure Extension Activity 1. 2. Online Resources Standards NCTE and IRA:

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