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Shakespearean Insulter

Shakespearean Insulter

http://www.pangloss.com/seidel/Shaker/index.html

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A-Z of Unusual Words - The Project Twins Bold graphics and visual wit are used to interpret and represent a collection of strange, unusual and lost words. These images explore the meaning behind the words, which are sometimes even more strange or unusual. This series of work has been exhibited during Design Week Dublin 2011 and has been featured and reviewed on various blogs and magazines including Brainpickings, The Huffington Post and Design Taxi. Awarded a Merit in the 3X3 Proshow and featured in 3X3 Illustration Annual 2012. Prints are available in our online shop. 50cm X 70cm Original Giclee Print on Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Rag, 310 gsm, bright whiteEdition Size – 10 (signed and numbered) Acersecomic: A person whose hair has never been cut.

Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. Otomata 16 Jul 2011 Click on the grid below to add cells, click on cells to change their direction, and press play to listen to your music. Update: Click here to get Otomata for your iPhone / iPod / iPad!

A Quick Guide to Reading Shakespeare Probably the number one complaint about reading Shakespeare is that it doesn't always read like "normal" English. It's a natural and legitimate accusation. Shakespeare wrote for an audience over 400 years ago. Think about how word meanings and expressions change over a relatively short time; four centuries bring with them a lot of alterations. For instance, the history of literary English is the history of invasions, with Celtic supplanted by Anglo-Saxon, which was usurped by Norman French (and accentuated with Latin). Unusual Words Unusual Words A by no means exhaustive list of rare, obscure, strange and sometimes funny words and their meanings that only seem to crop up in crosswords and dictionaries. Words that are used so seldom, you wonder who invented them and why. Home ~ The Stories ~ Diversions ~ Links ~ Contact

In Search of Shakespeare . The "Punny" Language of Shakespeare Introduction One of the most difficult challenges of studying Shakespeare is breaking the language barrier. There are several factors that often confuse the reader about the language of Shakespeare: the use of obsolete words, the order of sentence wording, and puns that depended on the meaning, usage, and pronunciation of words. For the first time reader of Shakespeare, the text may seem confusing and hard to translate, but it is important to understand that Shakespeare did indeed write in English, just a slightly different version of what we consider to be modern English. By learning about some of the Early Modern English word meanings, sentence structure, and puns students will be able to understand and enjoy the genius and humor in Shakespeare's work. Students will enjoy trying their hand at creating their own puns and finding puns in modern literature.

Eight great gadgets for college dorms It's almost time for college students to begin fall classes, so I thought it would be good to compile a list of gadgets for college dorms and apartments. The obvious ones, like smartphones, laptops, iPads and calculators aren't listed here because I went for the fun and unique gadgets instead. Take a look and let me know if you've found something cool that should be included. (Scroll to the bottom to see a video that demonstrates the gadgets.) 1. The Elite Cuisine Multi-Function 3-In-1 Breakfast Center is a coffee maker, toaster oven and griddle all in one.

Shakespeare Bookshelf Comedies Histories Poetry Tragedies The titles in the listing above link to the editions from the 1914 edition of The Oxford Shakespeare at Bartleby. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare from Jeremy Hylton at MIT are also available. 13 Unusual Words, Beautifully Illustrated Mellifluous -- a pleasant-sounding word used to describe pleasant sounds -- is a keen example of the wondrous, labyrinthine nature of language. In an illustration he made of the word for a series of language posters, illustrator Mick Watson depicted a yellow music note floating towards each corner of the page. With mellifluous and the handful of other linguistic gems he's visually translated, his spare designs bring the mood of each word to life. "I'm fascinated with the idea of signs and symbols provoking a subliminal response in the viewer," he told The Huffington Post.

Shakespeare's Grammar May Be The Real Source Of His Genius Read a line from a William Shakespeare play and notice the cadence with which you speak. All of those breaths and pauses from the commas and semicolons spread seemingly sporadically within the flowery language are not just for theatrical drama; they may be the source of Shakespeare's genius. Dr. Jonathan Hope, a reader in English in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, dedicates a majority of his research to figuring out what makes Shakespeare's prose so, well, poetic.

helping you keep track of the newest releases Music Grand Theatre Vol. 2 Old 97's Dracula, The Musical - The Studio Cast Recording Frank Wildhorn & Jeremy Roberts

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