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9 Websites You Can Use to Learn a Foreign Language - StumbleUpon

9 Websites You Can Use to Learn a Foreign Language - StumbleUpon
Traveling is a great way to see a country and learn about the people who live there. But if you really want to learn what makes them tick than you need to learn their language. Immersing yourself in a new language can seem like a daunting task. Fortunately, there are great free resources available to turn your first few words into fluency. BBC Languages A great resource to get you going. Word2Word This site can really increase your vocabulary and syntax. Internet Polyglot This site isn’t intended to be used as your sole learning site. Busuu A language learning community. Madinah Arabic Language Course This site was set up over 8 years ago specifically to teach Arabic for free. Livemocha Another learning language community. Skritter This site focuses on just Chinese and Japanese. Ethnologue Owned by SIL International, the Ethnologue is a listing of the known living languages of the world. My Happy Planet One more language community, but this one is different from the others. Related:  A Radical View of Chinese Characters

75 Free Language Learning Resources Online Whether you’re trying to learn English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, Italian –you get the picture – it’s good to get free help along the way. Luckily, there are tons of free online resources out there. Here are 75 to get you started … 1. 101Languages.net – Learn basics like vowels, consonants, phrases and vocabulary for various languages like Arabic, Bambara, Cebuano, Estonian, Icelandic, Latvian and Serbian. 2. 123TeachMe.com – 123TeachMe offers free learning materials, including games, quizzes, vocabulary builders, mp3 study lists, RSS vocabulary lists and more for adults and children. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. eLanguage.com – While the site isn’t completely free, it does offer free resources for various languages, including grammar guides. 17. eLanguageSchool.net – A huge resource for learning multiple languages, including Dutch, French, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, Korean and German. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 31. 32. 34. 35.

10 Open Education Resources You May Not Know About (But Should) This week, the OCW Consortium is holding its annual meeting, celebrating 10 years of OpenCourseWare. The movement to make university-level content freely and openly available online began a decade ago, when the faculty at MIT agreed to put the materials from all 2,000 of the university’s courses on the Web. With that gesture, MIT OpenCourseWare helped launch an important educational movement, one that MIT President Susan Hockfield described in her opening remarks at yesterday’s meeting as both the child of technology and of a far more ancient academic tradition: “the tradition of the global intellectual commons.” We have looked here before at how OCW has shaped education in the last ten years, but in many ways much of the content that has been posted online remains very much “Web 1.0.” But as open educational resources and OCW increase in popularity and usage, there are a number of new resources out there that do offer just that.

How I Became a Xenolinguist Wikiuniversity offers a wry definition of Xenolinguistics: “the scientific study of languages of non-human intelligences. Publications in this field tend to be speculative as few people have made the claim to have understood an alien language, at least not reliably.” The grand convergence of psychedelics and technology came in the summer of 1998. I was a grad student at RPI in communication and rhetoric, fully indoctrinated in (mostly French) critical theory, semiotics, new media theory, and the history of communication technology. The fictional world had established itself well enough that I could enter it, look around, and ask questions of the characters. Glide presented itself in the story-world as an alien language. When summer of 1998 was over, I did not have a visual language topic framed in terms of a semiotic or new media theory. Lily Pads Glide Maze Lily Glyph Blue Lily A series of software applications emerged from this process of psychedelic self-exploration. Like this:

Eliezer S. Yudkowsky Anki - friendly, intelligent flashcards Open Education Sites Offer Free Content for All Culture Digital Tools Flickr:FontFont Open education sites exemplify how technology is democratizing education. These sites allow both learners and teachers to create their own curriculum, whether it’s used in or out of the classroom. Here’s a comprehensive list of open education sites MindShift has covered. MIT Open CourseWare: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology publishes nearly all of its course content on this site, from videos to lecture notes to exams, all free of charge and open to the public. Explore: open content, open education resources, Open Source Welcome - The Rosetta Project 6 basic online college courses you can listen to as podcasts Sometimes the hardest part of getting a degree isn’t the final exam or the big midterm project. It’s getting started. Hell, sometimes it’s just trying to decide if you want to go back to school. If, however, you’re one of the millions who is thinking of changing careers to go back to school to earn your degree in a new field or you just want to learn the basics of a new field of study, the Internet is here to help. Classical Mechanics Physics can be one of the most difficult concepts to grasp and understand if you don’t have a good foundation of the basics to get you started. This Stanford course aims to teach the “essential theoretical foundations of modern physics” through a series of nine lectures that are free to download from iTunesU’s dedicated education section. Introduction to Biology Introduction to Psychology MIT offers just such a course through their online lecture series program. Introduction to Economics Modern American History Introduction to Political Philosophy

The Mnemosyne Project Find, share & upload documents. Get better grades | wePapers Glossary of linguistic terms Context for this page: Modular book: Glossary of linguistic terms, by Eugene E. Loos (general editor), Susan Anderson (editor), Dwight H., Day, Jr. (editor), Paul C. Jordan (editor), and J. Douglas Wingate (editor) In bookshelf: Linguistics Free video lectures,Free Animations, Free Lecture Notes, Free Online Tests, Free Lecture Presentations

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