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A.Word.A.Day

A.Word.A.Day
noun: 1. A playful leap: caper. 2. A leap made by a trained horse involving a backward kick of the hind legs at the top of the leap. From Middle French capriole (caper) or Italian capriola (leap), from Latin capreolus (goat), diminutive of caper (goat). Earliest documented use: 1580. “This new book, the fattest so far, has a good many such rash half-caprioles of wit.” “Spectators can watch a horse smaller than 34 inches tall do tricks such as a capriole, an upward leap combined with a backward kick of the hind feet.” See more usage examples of capriole in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

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