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WORD OF THE DAY - The Learning Network Blog

WORD OF THE DAY - The Learning Network Blog
remunerative•\ri-ˈmyü-nə-rə-tiv, -ˌrā-\• adjective 1. serving to pay for work done 2. producing a sizable profit The word remunerative has appeared in eight New York Times articles in the past year, including on July 9 in the India Ink blog post “The Food Security Debate in India” by Jean Drèze: Read more… dross•\ˈdräs, ˈdrȯs\• noun 1. worthless or dangerous material that should be removed2. the scum formed by oxidation at the surface of molten metals The word dross has appeared in nine New York Times articles in the past year, including on March 30 in the op-ed article “Why Fund-Raising Is Fun” by Arthur C. Read more… limpid•\ˈlim-pəd\• adjective 1. clear and bright2. transmitting light; able to be seen through with clarity3. The word limpid has appeared in 25 New York Times articles in the past year, including on Dec. 6 in the art review “Desire and Prudery, Wrestling to a Draw” by Ken Johnson: Read more… acoustics•\ə-ˈküs-tiks\• noun : the study of the physical properties of sound Read more…

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English Vocabulary Exercises Online, Printable Worksheets for Teachers and Fun Games ESL Lesson Plans & Resources for Kids Kiz School provides: Video Tutorials, PPT, Interactive Games & Quizzes, Printable PDF Worksheets & Flashcards, among others. You don't need to be a professional teacher to use our materials.It is an effective, affordable private and public teaching solution for parents and schools.

History of the OED The Oxford English Dictionary has been the last word on words for over a century. But, as with a respected professor or admired parent, we count on its wisdom and authority without thinking much about how it was acquired. What is the history of the Oxford English Dictionary? Exploring its origins and development will give new insight into this extraordinary, living document. How it began When the members of the Philological Society of London decided, in 1857, that existing English language dictionaries were incomplete and deficient, and called for a complete re-examination of the language from Anglo-Saxon times onward, they knew they were embarking on an ambitious project. book2 Audio Trainer - Learn 50 Languages Online for Free Free language lessons in over 50 languages book2 contains 100 lessons that provide beginners with a basic vocabulary. With no prior knowledge, you will learn to fluently speak short sentences in real-world situations in no time. The book2 method successfully combines audio and text for effective language learning.

200 Ways to Say “Went” Note: I have created a new and improved version of this poster: 250 Ways to Say “Went.” Check it out! A few weeks ago, I created a graphic poster that listed 100 ways to say “said.” It was quite a hit. But there are plenty of words that young writers settle for, perhaps because they are unaware of the many alternatives. Learn 10 new words in 16 minutes There is the famous quote which says that you can say very little without grammar but you can say nothing without vocabulary. I completely agree, and that is why I have created the following post. I aim to teach intermediate students 10 new words. In this post I am going to teach the words that are among the 4,000 most frequent words.

Online Etymology Dictionary bias (n.) 1520s, from French biais "slant, slope, oblique," also figuratively, "expedient, means" (13c., originally in Old French a past participle adjective, "sideways, askance, against the grain"), of unknown origin, probably from Old Provençal biais, with cognates in Old Catalan and Sardinian; possibly from Vulgar Latin *(e)bigassius, from Greek epikarsios "athwart, crosswise, at an angle," from epi- "upon" + karsios "oblique," from PIE *krs-yo-, from root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (see shear (v.)). It became a noun in Old French. "[A] technical term in the game of bowls, whence come all the later uses of the word" [OED]. Transferred sense of "predisposition, prejudice" is from 1570s in English. For what a man had rather were true he more readily believes.

The Vikings Are Coming! by John-Erik Jordan 139 Old Norse Words That Invaded The English Language When I say “Old English” what comes to mind? The ornate, hard-to-read script? Reading Beowulf in your high school English class? The kinds of figurative compound nouns – or kennings – like “swan of blood” and “slaughter-dew” that have sustained heavy metal lyrics for decades? Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. They add colour and interest to what we are saying.

Teaching Opinion, Informative & Narrative Writing Types Free Posters and Infographic: Teaching the Three Types of Writing The Common Core State Standards require that students know three main types of writing: opinion/argumentative, informative/explanatory and narrative. What are these types of writing and how can you explain them to students? Our classroom posters help you break it down by comparing the three types to the work of reporters, storytellers and debaters. 100 Whimsical Words by Mark Nichol The English language can be maddening to native speakers and learners alike, but is also delightfully rich, especially for those who seek to convey a lighthearted tone in their writing. Here are 100 words it’s difficult to employ without smiling.

How to Write a Short Story (with Sample Stories) Edit Article Three Parts:Sample Short StoriesWriting a Short StoryEditing a Short StoryCommunity Q&A For many writers, the short story is the perfect medium. While writing a novel can be a Herculean task, just about anybody can craft—and, most importantly, finish—a short story. That does not mean that short stories are easy to write or that they aren't as artistic and valuable as novels. Word Up: The Must Dos of Vocabulary Instruction A while ago, I wrote a post called Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary which spells out (get it?) the process and rationale for selecting certain vocabulary words and also describes six steps for teaching new words. Here, I'm going to add to that earlier musing on this topic by offering up some must dos that took me a few years down the teaching road to figure out. Must Do #1: Be Very Selective As for vocabulary lists, less is better. Long lists of words just don't stick.

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