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15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)
According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. They need this skill not because they’ll all go into it as a career—that isn’t realistic—but because it impacts every career in the 21st-century world. Teaching Coding to the Youngest Students Teaching Coding to Kids 8 and Up

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/15-ways-teaching-students-coding-vicki-davis

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Logic in Media Queries Just in case you have brain farts about this constantly like I do. If That's what media queries are: logical if statements. "If" these things are true about the browser, use the CSS inside. And The keyword and. Life After the Hour of Code Now that the excitement of the Hour of Code has passed, and you still vividly remember your students' eyes light up while completing their coding challenges, you may be wondering how to keep that excitement going in your classroom. The only thing is, you don't teach computer science -- and you have no idea how to teach coding. The great news is, that's fine!

Code Monster from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Monster gets kids excited about programming. It is a combination of a game and tutorial where kids experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Monster use Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want the play with the Code Monster. Otherwise, Code Monster will not be able to play with you. 28 Tools to Learn Computer Programming From edshelf by edshelf: A discovery engine of websites, mobile apps, desktop programs, and electronic products for teaching and learning. Teaching primary and secondary students how to program has become a hot topic lately. Even people like United States President Barack Obama to actress Angela Bassett to music artist Shakira have spoken about the value of computer programming in an initiative called Hour of Code. With good reason too. Technology is a major part of our lives. Knowing how to build new technologies means having the ability to shape its direction.

Creative Computing This guide was developed by members of the ScratchEd research team at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: Christan Balch, Michelle Chung, and Karen Brennan. We encourage you to use as much or as little of the guide as you like, to design new activities, and to remix the included activities. No matter your prior experience or expertise, we think of every educator as a co-designer of the Creative Computing experience. The Best Websites to Learn How to Write Code The best tutorials and websites where you can learn how to write code in PHP, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, Python and all the other popular programming languages. The Learn to Code movement has picked up momentum worldwide and that is actually a good thing as even basic programming skills can have a major impact. If you can teach yourself how to write code, you gain a competitive edge over your peers, you can think more algorithmically and thus can tackle problems more efficiently. Don’t just download the latest app, help redesign it. Don’t just play on your phone, program it. — Obama. There’s no reason why shouldn’t know the basics of coding.

15 Free Games to Level Up Your Coding Skills When I started learning to code, the options were limited—lots of books (not even e-books), some very basic online tutorials, and a whole lot of experimentation. Online learning has come a long way in the last few years. There are interactive courses, tons of online tutorials, and one of my personal favorite ways to practice coding: games. While a game alone probably isn’t going to teach you everything you need to know about coding, it can be a really incredible way to practice the skills you’re learning. How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition Welcome! Take a tour, experiment with Python, join more than 850,000 other readers in learning how to think like a computer scientist with Python. (welcome) You can experiment with activecode examples right in the bookClick Show/Hide Code buttonOn line 7: change numTurtles = 10 to numTurtles = 6Click the Run buttonYou can do your homework right in the textbook.You can interact with other learners to discuss homeworkInteractive questions make sure that you are on track and help you focus.Codelens helps you develop a mental model of how Python works.Audio Tours help you understand the code.Short videos cover difficult or important topics.You can highlight text, and take notes in scratch editors This interactive book is a product of the Runestone Interactive Project at Luther College, led by Brad Miller and David Ranum.

FEATURE: The Maze Coder Introducing students as young as 5 to the concepts of computer science can be challenging but also immensely rewarding. Though blockly-based platforms like Scratch and Hopscotch can prove too tricky for them, there are a wide range of apps available that introduce youngsters to sequencing, algorithms and simple computational thinking. From Daisy the Dinosaur to Lightbot and The Foos (my favourite for use with Foundation Stage students) the choice is excellent and the touch screen interface helps to streamline the process for those getting their very first taste of coding. Rather than start with an app though, I like to start with something more practical when first introducing computer science concepts in KS1. This could mean using floor robots to sequence a series of steps or perhaps something unplugged that takes a more kinaesthetic approach. There were a couple of major advantages to this approach.

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