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7 Sites That Make Programming For Kids Fun

7 Sites That Make Programming For Kids Fun
A recent Ted Talk featuring the charismatic 6th grade programmer Thomas Suarez has shown that programming is a skill that can be learnt at any age. With the huge number of sites and products dedicated to programming for kids, there has never been a better time to get your class coding. Statistics from the Survey of Graduate Enrollment and Degrees have shown that only 4.1% of master’s degrees awarded in 2009 were in Mathematics and Computer Science. This is concerning as many of today’s fastest growing professions are in related disciplines. With this need for programmers growing everyday, here are seven sites that focus on programming for kids and will encourage, nurture and ignite the coding spark for your students. 1. Aimed at students aged 8-16 years old, Scratch is one of the best ways to take the first leap into programming. 2. Alice is a 3D programming environment that allows students create animations, interactive games, or videos to share on the web. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

http://www.fractuslearning.com/2011/12/14/programming-for-kids/

Related:  Coding for KidsLearn to Program (in general)

Europe Code Week 2015 - Resources and guides EU Code Week is a grass-root movement run by volunteers who promote coding in their countries as Code Week Ambassadors. Anyone – schools, teachers, libraries, code clubs, businesses, public authorities – can organise a #CodeEU event and add it to the codeweek.eu map. To make organising and running coding events easier, we have prepared different toolkits and selected some of the best lesson plans, guides and other resources. Presentations and toolkits Local resources in your language A Beginner's Guide to Integrated Development Environments The Web Development Series is supported by Rackspace, the better way to do hosting. Learn more about Rackspace's hosting solutions here. If you're new to programming (or new to programming in a particular language) you might be looking for an IDE — that's an integrated development environment, the handy, dandy piece of software that acts as text editor, debugger and compiler all in one sometimes-bloated but generally useful package.

5 Brilliant 'Design Your Own Game' Websites for Students There’s been a lot of buzz lately about the use of gaming in the classroom – from the ‘gamification’ of learning to the use of Minecraft to teach everything from physics to strategic thinking. Since long before education technology even existed, video games have been a hugely successful way to engage students, creating a fun and compelling environment in which they can learn, develop and interact with their peers. But allowing students to actually take control of designing the game themselves takes the concept to a whole new level, allowing them to practice a host of new creative and technical skills. Here are 5 top websites – let the games begin! 1.

Top 10 Sites for Educational Games There's no denying the appeal that online games have for kids. Despite the stigma games hold, many online educational games not only enhance the joy of learning, but also strengthen skill sets. The following are my favorite educational gaming sites on the web. Funbrain- One of the most popular educational gaming sites around. Computing Corner With the new changes to the ICT curriculum in England for 2014, I decided to collate all the Computing links that I can in this one handy space. Suggestions welcome. Excellent guide to new Computing Curriculum from NAACE and CAS written by Miles Berry (@MBerry) Amazing Book by @SimonHaughton (Very good for adults too! ) Computing theory for 7 to 11 year-olds Brilliant explanation of Computational Thinking by Dan Bridge (@danfBridge)

repl.it Help What is repl.it? It is an online environment for interactively exploring programming languages. The name comes from the read-eval-print loop, the interactive toplevel used by languages like Lisp and Python. How do I start? Three Free iPad Apps That Teach Kids To Program The first time that I wanted to stay after school was in the sixth grade. In sixth grade we could stay after school to use Logo Writer. My friend Sean and I had a great time building some simple programs that we ran on the two computers in our teacher’s room. Today, students can learn programming on their iPads. Here are three free apps that students can use to learn programming on their iPads.

The 2015 Honor Roll: EdTech’s Must-Read K–12 IT Blogs The world of educational technology can be intimidating. Bloggers help make sense of this ever-changing industry with wit, insight and tactical advice. EdTech is proud to recognize this latest crop of the top K–12 IT bloggers. This year's 50 entries are a mix of veterans from years past, fresh picks by our editorial staff and nominations from readers. Best Free Ways to Learn Programming I can remember back when I was young how alien a couple of lines of code that were published in a kid's magazine looked to me. Some twenty years later (or should I better say a year ago), I decided that I should teach myself how to create some small and usable programs. Sad to say, I lost interest shortly after. Intelligent code completion Intelligent code completion appears in many program environments,[4][5] an example implementation being Visual Studio's IntelliSense. The term was originally popularized as "picklist" and some implementations still refer to it as such.[6] Overview[edit] Similar to other autocompletion systems, intelligent code completion is a convenient way to access descriptions of functions, particularly their parameter lists. It speeds up software development by reducing the amount of name memorization needed and keyboard input required.

Computer coding and programming for primary school children If getting your child to learn his times tables is a struggle, the thought of him mastering computer programming probably sounds rather far-fetched. But from September 2014, following a successful campaign led by Google chairman Eric Schmidt to introduce computer coding to the primary-school curriculum as a matter of ‘prominence and urgency’, all five to 11 year olds in England will be taught code as part of the ICT curriculum. Baffled? Here’s what you need to know. 8 Technologies That Will Shape Future Classrooms What does the future of learning hold? What will classrooms of the future be like? Emerging technologies such as cloud computing, augmented reality (AR) and 3D printing are paving the way for the future of education in ways we may have yet to see. At the very least though, we can extrapolate from what these promising technologies and predict how schools will adopt them in time to come. However, just as the original intentions for new technology often give way to innovative and unpredictable usage, we can never be sure if a twist is waiting for these rising stars. As for now, let us observe their progress and speculate on how these 8 up-and-coming technologies could potentially change education for the better.

Coding at school: a parent's guide to England's new computing curriculum Getting more kids to code has been a cause célèbre for the technology industry for some time. Teaching programming skills to children is seen as a long-term solution to the “skills gap” between the number of technology jobs and the people qualified to fill them. From this month, the UK is the guinea pig for the most ambitious attempt yet to get kids coding, with changes to the national curriculum.

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