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Artist James Hopkins

Artist James Hopkins
Related:  Skull Artwork

Dimitri Tsykalov Russian artist Dimitri Tsykalov uses fruits to curve carve out impressive and creepy looking skulls. Have a look. Amazing Exotic Gourd Lamps from Calabarte Creative ways to light up a room with amazing exotic gourd Lamps by Calabarte. Each gourd lamp is made from a gourd brought from Senegal and their exotic design is achieved after carefully selecting dried shells of gourd fruit and drilling patterns into them. Different patterns are designed by carving deeper or shallower into layers of wood. This allows light to pass through each carving, creating beautiful patterns of light on the walls. The fruit of the annual tropical vine originating in Africa and Asia are transformed into exceptional table lamps by careful drilling and framing. View the website

Scraping Away the Skin on Skull Nickels By James on September 28th, 2011 at 3:07 pm Art, Picture Pages Welcome Stumblers! If you think this post is cool, you can find more of our latest and more popular posts in the sidebar to the right. The term “Hobo Nickel” describes any small-denomination coin (though, normally soft nickels) that people carve to create miniature reliefs of…well, all sorts of things. This all sounds stimulating, I know, but have a little faith. Source – Colossal Art & Design Other Things You Might Find Interesting {*style:<ul>*}{*style:<li>*}{*style:<a href=' Adventure Time{*style:</a>*} My son knows that I’m an artist and he understands I draw comics but when I told him I was drawing Finn and Jake he looked at me like I was a movie star.

Sculptures Popping Out of Paintings Oh, to have been in Tokyo in June! Shintaro Ohata just finished up a solo exhibition at the Yukari Art Contemprary in Tokyo, Japan. This Hiroshima, Japan-born artist is known for his ability to show us everyday life in a cinematic way. He captures light in his paintings, showering the world, as we know it, with carefully placed strokes of it. "Every ordinary scenery in our daily lives, such as the rising sun, the beauty of a sunset or a glittering road paved with asphalt on a rainy night, becomes something irreplaceable if we think we wouldn’t be able to see them anymore," he told Yukari gallery. "I am creating works to capture lights in our everyday life and record them in the painting.” More than that, this artist has a unique style. Straight from the Yukari gallery, here's a sample of his stellar work. ' Photos courtesy of Yukari Art Contemporary.

Alan Sailer-Exploding Objects We found this pretty damn interesting and with technology these days the impossible is becoming possible. Photographer Alan Sailer comes up with a unique way to display exploding objects as art. Alan uses his garage to take these photos and he is able to make them brilliant by using a laser that triggers the flash to go off at the perfect second. A glass skull and an eye are just a few things that Alan is shooting these days and I’m sure he is enjoying every minute of it. (Via Format Mag) Take a look at the gallery below. Related "Brand Spirit" - Branded Objects in White Here is an interesting take on branded items that have all been removed of their branding by being painted white. In "Art" Proposition One - Max de Esteban Titled "Proposition One" we have to say it takes a damn creative mind and patient one at that to create photography such as this. In "Photography" Portraits by Patrick Bremer Today we present artist Patrick Bremer.

Netflix Envelope Doodles Admit it, you've done it. You've taken a Sharpie to a Netflix envelope and doodled the heck out of it. Not just once, but a multitude of times. You've then imagined the expression of the postal worker as the envelope passed through their hands, all with a wide grin on your face. Here are some fun examples of people who publicly admit to doing just that. Above drawn by jovino. From around the web: Above by: jovino Above by: Kill Taupe Above by: {heart} Above by: Garrett Miller Above by: Hugo Seijas Above by: okat Above by: maddieb Above by: Scott Snowden Above by: Sherry Thurner Above by: Joe Justus Above by: Ryan Bucher Above by: Marsha Baker Above by: Audrey Coleman Above by: Lain 3 Above by: Saybel Guzman Above by: Jonathan Palmisano Above by: Julie Zarate We've received so much love for the Netflix post, that we've dedicated an entire mini-site to it.

Katsuyo Aoki: Porcelain skulls Katsuyo Aoki’s porcelain skulls make death a beautiful thing With Halloween on its way and so much death imagery everywhere, it’s refreshing to see Katsuyo Aoki’s take on ghoulishness. Her porcelain skull sculptures feature meticulous vanilla white curly patterned details, that look like they could be made of coral–or maybe icing. See more of Katsuyo Aoki’s skulls below. The Tire Art of Wim Delvoye For his series titled "Pneu", Belgian artist Wim Delvoye created a series of decorative objects by hand-carving intricate patterns and floral motifs on used car tires. Through his manipulation of found objects, Delvoye transforms things that seem useful in everyday life into sculptural pieces that carry a different value from their original intended purpose. Delvoye calls his own approach to art ‘glocal’, referring to ‘local’ and ‘global’, which is his own ironical way of describing art. Find out more about Wim's work here.

Incredible Skull Illusions Renown artist Istvan Orosz has made illustrations for a new edition of “Ship of Fools,” a late 15th century book by Sebastian Brant. Orosz’ optical illusions revolve around Medieval themes, and they are meticulously planned and executed. You can view more images from this collection at Gallery Diabolus. See also: “Magical Mirror Anamorphoses,” and “The Skull Illusion.” Images © Istvan Orosz, courtesy of Gallery Diabolus Link via Utisz The Infinity Room With this immersive installation, French artist Serge Salat invites visitors to take a journey through endless layers of space, decked out with cubic shapes, panels of mirrors, shifting lights and music. “Beyond Infinity” is a multi-sensory, multimedia experience that blends Eastern Chinese with Western Renaissance. Inspired by the Suzhou Gardens, a masterpiece of Chinese landscape, the three-lined trigram of I Ching is the main pattern that organizes the space of the work. Salat uses mirrors as optical illusions, exploding a single room into spatial infinity. via [Architizer] Views: 422998 Tags: Serge Salat, The Infinity Room, architecture, design

Intricate Glass Model of Human Body is a Breathtaking Medical Teaching Tool Proving that art and science aren’t mutually exclusive, Gary Farlow’s team at Farlow’s Scientific Glassblowing reproduces breathtaking anatomically correct glass models of the human body. These intricate glass sculptures are used for teaching in medical training, able to simulate blood flow, demonstrate new surgical tools and teach placement of catheters and angioplasty devices. “We do almost every part of the body,” Farlow tells Wired. “It can take a pretty artistic mind to make some of these things.” The arteries, veins and capillaries are shaped individually are fused together. Check out the full gallery at Wired. TetraBox Light by Ed Chew Liquid to Light Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space. Designer: Ed Chew

Our Exquisite Corpse Huichol Beaded Skulls There is always something simply beautiful about traditional works. The sense of history and craftsmanship behind some of the most beautiful artifacts outshine even the most brilliant of contemporary works. Such is the case with the Our Exquisite Corpse Huichol beaded skulls currently presented by LN-CC . Working directly with the Huichol people of Mexico the group curated an interested collection of handcrafted skulls. The skulls stand as not only art but a piece of history of the Huichol people.

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