background preloader

Richard MacDonald Studio

http://www.richardmacdonald.com/

Related:  SculpturefigureSculpture

Piero Manzoni Piero Manzoni (July 13, 1933 – February 6, 1963) was an Italian artist best known for his ironic approach to avant-garde art. Often compared to the work of Yves Klein, his own work anticipated, and directly influenced, the work of a generation of younger Italian artists brought together by the critic Germano Celant in the first Arte Povera exhibition held in Genoa, 1967.[1] Manzoni is most famous for a series of artworks that call into question the nature of the art object, directly prefiguring Conceptual Art.[2][3] His work eschews normal artist's materials, instead using everything from rabbit fur to human excrement in order to "tap mythological sources and to realize authentic and universal values".[2] Biography[edit] Manzoni was born in Soncino, province of Cremona. His full name was Count Meroni Manzoni di Chiosca e Poggiolo.[5]

John William Waterhouse John William Waterhouse (born between January and April 1849; died 10 February 1917) was an English painter known for working in the Pre-Raphaelite style. He worked several decades after the breakup of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, which had seen its heyday in the mid-nineteenth century, leading him to have gained the moniker of "the modern Pre-Raphaelite".[1] Borrowing stylistic influences not only from the earlier Pre-Raphaelites but also from his contemporaries, the Impressionists,[1] his artworks were known for their depictions of women from both ancient Greek mythology and Arthurian legend. Born in Italy to English parents who were both painters, he later moved to London, where he enrolled in the Royal Academy of Art. He soon began exhibiting at their annual summer exhibitions, focusing on the creation of large canvas works depicting scenes from the daily life and mythology of ancient Greece.

Yuki Matsueda ‘While most designers are busying adding more and more elements into their artworks, Japan-based Yuki Matsueda has, however, managed to let some elements escape from his art pieces. The result seems quite amazing… A vivid 3D image is successfully created and all the elements are believed to be more shocking than those stay still on paper.’

Rey Bustos' Draw Like The Old Masters Rey Bustos' Draw Like The Old Masters Learn artistic anatomy and how to draw the figure from like the old masters. Personal Letter from Ryan: Welcome to Visualarium. I'm super excited to be offering this course with Rey. Search Results …urtesy Klein Sun Gallery Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery Currently on view at Klein Sun Gallery in New York, artist Li Hongbo (previously) has an exhibition of new and old work titled Tools of Study. Hongbo is known for his unconventional figurative sculptures made from thousands of sheets of flexible paper that twist and elongate in almost any direction, many of which take several months to complete. Via Klein Sun: Li Hongbo’s stunning, stret… Read more...

Expressionism Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.[1][2] Expressionist artists sought to express meaning[3] or emotional experience rather than physical reality.[3][4] Origin of the term[edit] In 1905, a group of four German artists, led by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, formed Die Brücke (the Bridge) in the city of Dresden. This was arguably the founding organization for the German Expressionist movement, though they did not use the word itself. A few years later, in 1911, a like-minded group of young artists formed Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) in Munich.

Carved Book Landscapes by Guy Laramee (click images for detail) For the better part of three decades multidisciplinary artist Guy Laramee has worked as a stage writer, director, composer, a fabricator of musical instruments, a singer, sculptor, painter and writer. Among his sculptural works are two incredible series of carved book landscapes and structures entitled Biblios and The Great Wall, where the dense pages of old books are excavated to reveal serene mountains, plateaus, and ancient structures. Of these works he says: So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint Romantic landscapes. Zeitgeist's Irregular Twin Cloud II, Walls is building tension between an uncontrolled catastrophe and the controlled, abstract and clean environment of the engineer's drawing space. Considered a homage to Daniel Libeskind's early drawing work "Micromegas" and the "War and Architecture" drawings of Lebbeus Woods, "Cloud II, Walls" makes it possible to think two realms as one: the potential of systemic failure together with the assertion of control and the beauty of generating an artifact of indeterminate form in between. It is also part of Zeitguised's larger strand of work that is concerned with clouds of grey goo: a transitionary, metastable mass that is nothing yet becomes anything, if only for a fleeting moment. A swarming system that shows symptoms of life and the agility of a connected organism, the cloud is a bastardization of the abstract and the real as a twitching borderline between fiction and concretization. Scripting: Julius Steinhauser Sound: Zeitguised with Michael Fakesch.

Tom Stogdon Sculpture Tom was born into a fourth generation of greengrocers in Bloomsbury, London and worked in the fruit trade until 1998. His first ventures into sculpture began by making elaborate pieces using fruit and vegetables, and then gradually progressed into using slate and metal. His experiments with stone and the wearing influence of water have very much dictated the direction of his work in the last few years. Repetition and movement are recurring themes but always with a strong sense of calm. Pierre-Auguste Renoir Pierre-Auguste Renoir (US /rɛnˈwɑr/ or UK /ˈrɛnwɑr/; French: [pjɛʁ oɡyst ʁənwaʁ]; 25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that "Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau."[1] Pierre-Auguste was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69).

82 Clever and Creative Fred & Friends Products I'm sure you've come across Fred & Friend products before at your local indie store and might not have even known it. Last weekend I was cruising around town and stopped at an indie store only to find one whole corner of the place dedicated to Fred & Friend products. It was heavenly. I stood there for probably more than a half hour laughing and checking out all their cool stuff. A lot of creativity goes into the making of these products, and I think part of that cleverness is shown in the name of the product and the slogan.

HA Schult, Art is Life The most important material used by HA Schult for his attacks against an impassive, and waning cultural institution is garbage. Garbage used as a material of refusal and provocation. Armin Zweite, 1974 Kintsugi: The Art of Broken Pieces Wikipedia Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original. The video above was filmed at Tokyobike in London which recently had a Kintsugi workshop. If you’d like to try the technique yourself, Humade offers gold and silver DIY kintsugi kits.

Related:  human anatomyartists