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LSL Portal

LSL Portal
LSL (Linden Scripting Language) is the scripting language that gives behavior to Second Life primitives, objects, and avatars. This is a community effort to provide an accurate & open documentation resource on LSL for scripters of all skill levels. Feel free to edit and add content. For more information on how to edit the wiki, see Editing Guidelines. Do not copy any information from other sources, unless you are sure about the copyright agreements. See the LSL Portal discussion page for more information. Want to learn LSL?

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/LSL_Portal

Related:  ScriptingSecond LifeSecond Life

Scripting late 14c., "something written," earlier scrite (c.1300), from Old French escrit "piece of writing, written paper; credit note, IOU; deed, bond" (Modern French écrit) from Latin scriptum "a writing, book; law; line, mark," noun use of neuter past participle of scribere "to write," from PIE *skribh- "to cut, separate, sift" (cf. Greek skariphasthai "to scratch an outline, sketch," Lettish skripat "scratch, write," Old Norse hrifa "scratch"), from root *(s)ker- "cut, incise" (cf. Old English sceran "cut off, shear;" see shear (v.)) on the notion of carving marks in stone, wood, etc. Meaning "handwriting" is recorded from 1860. Theatrical use, short for manuscript, is attested from 1884.

Second Life: New World Notes SL Flickr of the Day: Moos Makes the Metaverse His Canvas "Lost" isn't some mid-century masterpiece you forgot you once saw, it's a screenshot Second Life (at least it started that way): Moos Hultcrantz is the man who made the metaverse his canvas in this way, and the rest of his many SL photos (some more post-processed than others) is a perfect stream of moody eye candy for the weekend. Here's a stream featuring the late-lamented Venexia in SL: Continue reading "SL Flickr of the Day: Moos Makes the Metaverse His Canvas"

Build Tools How to build objects This page presents a short "crash course" on building in the Second Life® virtual world. Getting started Day 129: Creating Prim Hair Part 1 Like Prim Shoes, Prim Hair is probably one of the most popular items that attach to your avatar. So I thought I might try my hand at making a set of prim hair and sharing my experience. This will be a multi-part tutorial. We will create a static prim hair in the first 2 parts, complete with hair texture. I will try to do more later with flexi and curls :) Its one thing to create a hairstyle, and another to write a tutorial about creating a hairstyle.

Script Libraries - The Schommunity Wiki From The Schommunity Wiki As we get more involved with Second Life it's becoming clear that we need to find and share useful scripts. This page is a list of scripting resources we've found, and scripts we're working on (some complete, and some still in production). Scripting Your Video The steps we take to prepare scripts for our videos, from our scripting questionnaire to Google doc collaboration to the table read. We've heard many companies describe scripting as their primary pain point in the video production process, and it makes perfect sense. There's a lot to consider when you’re writing a script. It acts as the blueprint for your video, and the more you think about things like tone, word choice, and audience engagement ahead of time, the better your end product will be. The scripting process

Discussing How to save Second Life textures to your hard drive in Linden Village ▓▒░ TORLEY ░▒▓ says: ... so you can upload them to Flickr! The following info is also in the official Second Life Knowledge Base. You can export any fully-permissive texture from Second Life and save it to your hard drive (or other storage medium). LSL 101/A Gentle Introduction From Second Life Wiki Second Life Wiki > LSL 101/A Gentle Introduction A Gentle Introduction to Scripting in Second Life LSL 101: The Wikibook is written for the SL user who has no experience with computer programming; or, for users with programming experience who would like a gentle introduction to LSL. This section assumes you have basic building skills, since scripting is just one aspect of building. Virtual world The user accesses a computer-simulated world which presents perceptual stimuli to the user, who in turn can manipulate elements of the modeled world and thus experience a degree of telepresence.[6] Such modeled worlds and their rules may draw from the reality or fantasy worlds. Example rules are gravity, topography, locomotion, real-time actions, and communication. Communication between users can range from text, graphical icons, visual gesture, sound, and rarely, forms using touch, voice command, and balance senses. Virtual worlds are not limited to games but, depending on the degree of immediacy presented, can encompass computer conferencing and text based chatrooms. Sometimes, emoticons or 'smilies' are available to show feeling or facial expression. Emoticons often have a keyboard shortcut.[9] Edward Castronova is an economist who has argued that "synthetic worlds" is a better term for these cyberspaces, but this term has not been widely adopted.

Scripting Snippets, 7: Creating a HUD « A View From Another Life This is going to be a long one. Get yourself a cup of coffee first. What is a HUD? If you have to ask that question, you probably won’t get much from this article, but HUD is an acronym of Head-Up Display, and allows creators in Second Life to add a user-interface to gadgets. They are created from prims just like any other user-created objects in Second Life, but they are only visible to their owner, and always appear ‘flat’ against the screen. Scripting The scripting module allows to use scripts in order to evaluate custom expressions. For example, scripts can be used to return "script fields" as part of a search request, or can be used to evaluate a custom score for a query and so on. The scripting module uses by default groovy as the scripting language with some extensions. Groovy is used since it is extremely fast and very simple to use.

Take a Sneak Peek at the Pathfinding Experiments B An ethereal wisp glides through a fantasy forest and then vanishes, only to reappear at your side a few seconds later. Dozens of beetles and rats creep across the floor of a decaying,decrepit building, scurrying away whenever you get near. A hideous, scaly beast chases you up hills and across regions, dodging anything that gets between it and dinner. These experiences are possible because Linden Lab is about to unveil a new, robust pathfinding system that will allow objects to intelligently navigate around the world while avoiding obstacles. Pathfinding is a new set of LSL calls and Viewer tools that allow for smoother and smarter movement for non-player characters and objects in Second Life.

Related:  Second LifeScripting