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Eight Secrets Which Writers Won't Tell You

Eight Secrets Which Writers Won't Tell You
Image from Flickr by Lazurite This is not particularly relevant to the post, but I’m getting an awful lot of comments telling me, often a little snarkily, “it’s ‘THAT’ not ‘WHICH’”. The “don’t use which for restrictive clauses” rule comes (as far as I can tell) from Strunk and White. Plenty of authors, including Austen, have used “which” exactly as I use it in the title. It’s very commonly used like this here in England, so I’m guessing my comments are coming from US readers. There was never a period in the history of English when “which” at the beginning of a restrictive relative clause was an error. I thought about putting “that” in the title – but I like the sound of “which” between “secrets” and “writers”. And with that out of the way, enjoy the post! A few years ago, I’d look at published writers and think that they were somehow different from me. They were real writers. I’m going to go through eight secrets. Secret #1: Writing is Hard The truth is, though, that writing is hard.

http://www.aliventures.com/8-writing-secrets/

23 Websites that Make Your Writing Stronger We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. ~Ernest Hemingway How strong is your writing? ACT Test Prep : Writing Test Description English | Math | Reading | Science | Writing The Writing Test is a 30-minute essay test that measures your writing skills—specifically those writing skills emphasized in high school English classes and in entry-level college composition courses. The test consists of one writing prompt that will define an issue and describe two points of view on that issue. You are asked to respond to a question about your position on the issue described in the writing prompt. In doing so, you may adopt one or the other of the perspectives described in the prompt, or you may present a different point of view on the issue. Your score will not be affected by the point of view you take on the issue.

25 Things Every Writer Should Know An alternate title for this post might be, “Things I Think About Writing,” which is to say, these are random snidbits (snippets + tidbits) of beliefs I hold about what it takes to be a writer. I hesitate to say that any of this is exactly Zen (oh how often we as a culture misuse the term “Zen” — like, “Whoa, that tapestry is so cool, it’s really Zen“), but it certainly favors a sharper, shorter style than the blathering wordsplosions I tend to rely on in my day-to-day writing posts. Anyway. Move over eBay - this is the police Get amazing bargains on property, cars, computers ... buy top-quality stolen bikes for £10 at official police auctions ... discover the secrets of government auctions ... fantastic prices on army surplus ... ridiculously low clearance prices from government departments. These claims are plastered over internet adverts. But do these secret stashes of bargain goods really exist? Is there a sort of parallel eBay known only to a select few? Many of the claims are indeed bunk, but when Guardian Money investigated, the big surprise was that there are bargains to be found if you search hard enough - from stolen bikes starting at £1 where the police can't find the owner to RAF officer shoes at £4 a pair.

25 Insights on Becoming a Better Writer When George Plimpton asked Ernest Hemingway what the best training for an aspiring writer would be in a 1954 interview, Hem replied, “Let’s say that he should go out and hang himself because he finds that writing well is impossibly difficult. Then he should be cut down without mercy and forced by his own self to write as well as he can for the rest of his life. At least he will have the story of the hanging to commence with.” Today, writing well is more important than ever. Far from being the province of a select few as it was in Hemingway’s day, writing is a daily occupation for all of us — in email, on blogs, and through social media. How To Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me) - Austin Kleon Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 Buy the book: Amazon | B&N | More… Here’s what a few folks have said about it: “Brilliant and real and true.”—Rosanne Cash“Filled with well-formed advice that applies to nearly any kind of work.”

Block "A Block By Any Other Name..."By Kristi Holl A Rose is a Rose is a Rose... How I Make My Living as an Online Writer (And How You Could Too) (Photo by Antonina, a fantastic London contemporary portrait photographer) The end of this month will mark three years since I left my day job. Since then, I’ve been supporting myself through writing. Nerdy Day Trips Add Your Day Trip Once you're happy with your pin position, you can save it to the map for everyone to see. Pin position cannot be changed later, so please take care to place it correctly.I am finished - place my spot. Please click on the map to drop your pin.If you get it wrong, you can move it by dragging the new pin to where you want it Once you're happy with the new pin position, please click I'm Finished, and the administrators will be notified of the change request.I am finished - request chqnge.

Most incredible wide angle photography for inspiration Most photographers likes to snap wide angle photos using their digital cameras and zoom lenses.While the widest setting of these zoomed catches is more expensive than the ‘normal’ view of the human eye, This explains why we never seem to have enough width when shooting with our compact digital cameras.However, even catching or capturing wide angle with a limited view can explode awesome results.And there are ways you can boost the impact of the picture. Some important wide angle photography techniques are available here. At last you can find more resources to learn about wide angle photography and lenses.In this post i want to inspiring you with the below incredible captures. we hope these shots give you a little inspiration to rediscover the wider end of your camera’s zoom. Beginners introduction to wildlife photography How to use ultra wide lenses

50 of the Best Websites for Writers There are tons of reference sites on the web that can help you find a job or write a poem, essay or story. Here is a list of the best 50 websites for writers. Reference Websites Merriam-Webster Online - Merriam Webster is the perfect place to look up words and find information. The site offers a dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, podcasts, word games and a lot of other things that may be of interest to writers and word-lovers. 5 Freewriting Secrets for Being a "Genius" You've heard of freewriting, certainly. At its most basic, it's about forcing your internal editor to stay away while you splash your most raw and unusual thoughts onto the page. In Accidental Genius: Using Writing to Generate Your Best Ideas, Insights, and Content (2nd edition, revised & updated), Mark Levy tells how he uses freewriting, not only to loosen up his writing muscles, but to solve business problems of all kinds. Levy, author, writing teacher, and marketing strategist, shares a few "secrets" for making freewriting an indispensible tool: 5 Freewriting Tips 1.

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