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Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader

Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader
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How to embrace the near-win: Sarah Lewis at TED2014 Sarah Lewis. Photo: Bret Hartman “In that moment, my view of success and creativity changed,” says Lewis. “I realized that success is a moment, but what we’re always celebrating is creativity and mastery. We often want the moment of completion, but what really propels us is the unfinished.” So how do we move from success to mastery? To explain what she means, she brings us to a varsity archery practice at Columbia University. Lewis points out that Cézanne found many of his works so incomplete that he only signed 10% of them. “The pursuit of mastery is an ever-onward almost,” says Lewis. So how do you keep reaching? The near-win changes our view of the landscape, says Lewis. She brings us back to those archers, and their coach. It sounds a touch depressing, but Lewish ends with an inspiring thought. “Coming close to what you thought you wanted can help you attain what you never dreamed you could,” she says.

8 math talks to blow your mind Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways? Here, he tells of his travels around the continent in search of an answer. How big is infinity? Arthur Benjamin does “Mathemagic” A whole team of calculators is no match for Arthur Benjamin, as he does astounding mental math in the blink of an eye. Scott Rickard: The beautiful math behind the ugliest music What makes a piece of music beautiful? Benoit Mandelbrot: Fractals and the art of roughness The world is based on roughness, explains legendary mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot.

TEDxWhitechapel | Visions for Transition: challenging existing paradigms and redefining values (for a more beautiful world) You Can Easily Learn 100 TED Talks Lessons In 5 Minutes Which Most People Need 70 Hours For The other week I watched 70 hours of TED talks; short, 18-minute talks given by inspirational leaders in the fields of Technology,Entertainment, and Design (TED). I watched 296 talks in total, and I recently went through the list of what I watched, weeded out the crappy and boring talks, and created a list of the 100 best things I learned ! This article isn’t entirely about productivity, but I guarantee you’ll learn a thing or two. Here are 100 incredible things I learned watching 70 hours of TED talks last week! Productivity 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Here are three other productivity experiments I’ve done recently: Meditating for 35 hours over 7 days; using my smartphone for only an hour a day for three months; living in total reclusion for 10 days. More TED Talks lessons: Speak like a Pro- 15 lessons learned from watching TED TALKS Becoming a better human 23, 24, 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35, 36, 37, 38, 39. 40, 41. 42.

12 pieces of advice for giving talks that have impact Courtney E. Martin hosts a session called “The 19th Minute,” and shared valuable insight on how to give a talk that has real impact. Photo: Marla Aufmuth/TED Sharing an idea isn’t like snapping your fingers — things don’t just instantly change. Deborah Rhodes spoke about the momentum her TEDWomen talk has built for using Molecular Breast Imaging rather than traditional mammography to screen for breast cancer under certain conditions. After this, Martin shared some tips that she’s used as both a speaker and a coach. Be unapologetically you.

The funniest TED Talks | Playlist Now playing The New Yorker receives around 1,000 cartoons each week; it only publishes about 17 of them. In this hilarious, fast-paced, and insightful talk, the magazine's longstanding cartoon editor and self-proclaimed "humor analyst" Bob Mankoff dissects the comedy within just some of the "idea drawings" featured in the magazine, explaining what works, what doesn't, and why. 10 talks you won't be able to stop thinking about | Playlist Now playing Here's a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven Pinker is gradually, brilliantly persuaded by philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein that reason is actually the key driver of human moral progress, even if its effect sometimes takes generations to unfold.

The Five Greatest TED Talks of All Time by Maria Popova Democratizing knowledge, the meaning of life, and why everything we know about creativity is wrong. Today marks the fifth anniversary of TED talks becoming available to the world. I can’t overstate how much TED has changed my life personally, and what a tour de force it has been culturally. Some time ago, I channeled my love for TED in a remix project called TEDify, collaging and animating soundbites from TED talks into narratives along different themes. Today, to celebrate the big occasion, I’ve tried to curate my five favorite TED talks of all time — operative word being “tried,” since it felt a bit like asking a parent to pick out her favorite child. When Elizabeth Gilbert took the TED stage in 2009, it didn’t take long to realize her talk would be among TED’s finest. Don’t be daunted. Gilbert is the author Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia, which, despite the awful Hollywood adaptation, remains an excellent read.

70+ book picks from TED speakers and attendees The tables in bookstores can be overwhelming: Every book cover looks appealing, every blurb glows with praise. Sometimes, you just need a recommendation from a human, someone you trust. Below, 10 members of the TED community — with very different points of view — share the books they think you’ll enjoy this summer. Their selections are wonderfully untethered to new releases and bestsellers, with a little something for everyone. Mind-bending fiction, picked by David Eagleman David Eagleman is a neuroscientist whose sensory vest may just expand the limits of human perception. Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges. The Bear by William Faulkner. The Most Human Human: What Artificial Intelligence Teaches Us About Being Alive by Brian Christian. The Arrival by Shaun Tan. Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon. Last and First Men by Olaf Stapledon. Things That Are: Essays by Amy Leach. Books on art and race, picked by Anne Pasternak

Watch Jon Stewart’s Moving Comments on Charleston Shooting and Racism in America‏ by Liz Pleasant On Thursday June 18, the day after the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church Shooting, Jon Stewart had an unusual welcome for his Daily Show audience. There were no funny jokes or hilarious news clips. Instead, Stewart gave a serious 5-minute monologue about racism and the reality of being black in South Carolina and across the country. “That’s insanity. “I got nothing for you in terms of jokes,” Stewart said. Stewart criticized the mainstream media for calling the shooting a “senseless tragedy,” a phrase he says distracts from the fact that the mass murder in Charleston was a direct and racist attack on the black community. Stewart went on call out Americans for ignoring deep-seated racism throughout the country. Stewart’s decision to stray from his usual style of programming has gotten a lot of attention.

21 Short Videos Worth More Than an MBA If you're determined to get a job that requires an MBA, by all means spend the time and money to get one. However, if you want to know more about business than 99.9 percent of your colleagues, you can spend a day watching these TED Talks. Motivation 1. Why we do what we do Tony Robbins discusses the invisible forces that make us do what we do and how to use them to your advantage. 2. Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: that traditional rewards aren't very effective. 3. Shawn Achor argues that happiness inspires productivity and that the concept that we should work to be happy is backwards. Management 4. Jason Fried explains why the office isn't a good place to get work done and why people who work elsewhere are more productive. 5. Sheryl Sandberg looks at why a smaller percentage of women than men reach the top of their professions, and offers advice to women aiming for the C-suite. 6. Marketing 7. 8. 9. Economics

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