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Are the robots about to rise? Google's new director of engineering thinks so…

Are the robots about to rise? Google's new director of engineering thinks so…
It's hard to know where to start with Ray Kurzweil. With the fact that he takes 150 pills a day and is intravenously injected on a weekly basis with a dizzying list of vitamins, dietary supplements, and substances that sound about as scientifically effective as face cream: coenzyme Q10, phosphatidycholine, glutathione? With the fact that he believes that he has a good chance of living for ever? He just has to stay alive "long enough" to be around for when the great life-extending technologies kick in (he's 66 and he believes that "some of the baby-boomers will make it through"). Or with the fact that he's predicted that in 15 years' time, computers are going to trump people. That they will be smarter than we are. But then everyone's allowed their theories. And now? But it's what came next that puts this into context. Google has bought almost every machine-learning and robotics company it can find, or at least, rates. And those are just the big deals. So far, so sci-fi. Well, yes.

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/feb/22/robots-google-ray-kurzweil-terminator-singularity-artificial-intelligence

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Why a superintelligent machine may be the last thing we ever invent "...why would a smart computer be any more capable of recursive self-improvement than a smart human?" I think it mostly hinges on how artificial materials are more mutable than organic ones. We humans have already already developed lots of ways to enhance our mental functions, libraries, movies, computers, crowdsourcing R&D, etc.

Bill Gates is worried about artificial intelligence too Bill Gates has a warning for humanity: Beware of artificial intelligence in the coming decades, before it's too late. Microsoft's co-founder joins a list of science and industry notables, including famed physicist Stephen Hawking and Internet innovator Elon Musk, in calling out the potential threat from machines that can think for themselves. Gates shared his thoughts on AI on Wednesday in a Reddit "AskMeAnything" thread, a Q&A session conducted live on the social news site that has also featured President Barack Obama and World Wide Web founder Tim Berners-Lee. "I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence," Gates said in response to a question about the existential threat posed by AI.

UFOs Skip to Main Content Home > UFOs UFOs Newly released UFO files from the UK government Files released in June 2013 The final tranche of UFO files released by The National Archives contain a wide range of UFO-related documents, drawings, letters, and photos and parliamentary questions covering the final two years of the Ministry of Defence's UFO Desk (from late 2007 until November 2009). Google Will Soon Know You Better Than Your Spouse Does, Top Exec Says Ray Kurzweil, the director of engineering at Google, believes that the tech behemoth will soon know you even better than your spouse does. Kurzweil, who Bill Gates has reportedly called "the best person [he knows] at predicting the future of artificial intelligence," told the Observer in a recent interview that he is working with Google to create a computer system that will be able to intimately understand human beings. (Read Kurzweil's full interview with the Observer here.) "I have a one-sentence spec which is to help bring natural language understanding to Google," the 66-year-old tech whiz told the news outlet of his job. "My project is ultimately to base search on really understanding what the language means."

Secret clue on 400-year-old map may solve mystery of lost colony of Roanoke A secret clue on a 400-year-old map might solve the long-standing mystery of the lost colony of Roanoke. Researchers from the First Colony Foundation say they have found evidence that this lost colony went "native". The group of 115 people were sent to the New World to set up a new city in 1587 by Queen Elizabeth. Stephen Hawking Says A.I. Could Be Our 'Worst Mistake In History' You have to understand Stephen Hawking's mind is literally trapped in a body that has betrayed him. Sadly, the only thing he can do is think. The things he's been able to imagine and calculate using the power of his mind alone is mindboggling.

Artificial intelligence, emotion, singularity, and awakening The Heartless System For professor Noel Sharkey, the greatest danger posed by AI is its lack of sentience, rather than the presence of it. As warfare, policing and healthcare become increasingly automated and computer-powered, their lack of emotion and empathy could create significant problems. "Eldercare robotics is being developed quite rapidly in Japan," Sharkey said. "Robots could be greatly beneficial in keeping us out of care homes in our old age, performing many dull duties for us and aiding in tasks that failing memories make difficult. But it is a trade-off.

These YouTube Videos Supposedly Induce Insomnia Curing ‘Brain Orgasms’ via Huffington Post It’s a sensation that also goes by autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR: a non-clinical term for the relaxing, tingling feeling at the top of the head that proponents say can lead to a number of therapeutic, if scientifically unproven, benefits. Brittany Connolly, a maker of ASMR videos, told The Huffington Post by email that ASMR clips have helped her through “both anxiety disorders and sleep problems.” Likewise, Rebekah Smith, an ASMR video maker and curator, says she uses the videos to help her sleep at night, and that 75 percent of her followers online do as well. Nicholas Tufnell, a Wired UK reporter, started watching the videos on YouTube in 2012, desperate for a solution to his chronic sleeplessness. But for all the online enthusiasm it’s generated, ASMR has only the anecdotal support of its adherents to vouch for it.

Are we already living in the technological singularity? The news has been turning into science fiction for a while now. TVs that watch the watcher, growing tiny kidneys, 3D printing, the car of tomorrow, Amazon's fleet of delivery drones – so many news stories now "sound like science fiction" that the term returns 1,290,000 search results on Google. The pace of technological innovation is accelerating so quickly that it's possible to perform this test in reverse. Google an imaginary idea from science fiction and you'll almost certainly find scientists researching the possibility. Warp drive? The Multiverse?

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Sure, Artificial Intelligence May End Our World, But That Is Not the Main Problem The robots will rise, we’re told. The machines will assume control. For decades we have heard these warnings and fears about artificial intelligence taking over and ending humankind. Such scenarios are not only currency in Hollywood but increasingly find supporters in science and philosophy. For example, Ray Kurzweil wrote that the exponential growth of AI will lead to a technological singularity, a point when machine intelligence will overpower human intelligence.

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