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Arrest of Bradley Manning

Arrest of Bradley Manning
Assigned in 2009 to an Army unit in Iraq as an intelligence analyst, Manning had access to classified databases. In early 2010, she leaked classified information to WikiLeaks and confided this to Adrian Lamo, an online acquaintance. Lamo informed Army Counterintelligence, and Manning was arrested in May that same year. The material included videos of the July 12, 2007 Baghdad airstrike, and the 2009 Granai airstrike in Afghanistan; 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables; and 500,000 Army reports that came to be known as the Iraq War logs and Afghan War logs. Much of the material was published by WikiLeaks or its media partners between April and November 2010.[8] Reaction to Manning's disclosures, arrest, and sentence was mixed. Background Early life Born Bradley Edward Manning in 1987 in Crescent, Oklahoma, she was the second child of Susan Fox, originally from Wales, and Brian Manning, an American. Parents' divorce, move to Wales Manning's father remarried in 2000, the same year as his divorce. Related:  Persons of Interest

Glenn Greenwald Glenn Greenwald (born March 6, 1967) is an American political journalist, lawyer, columnist, blogger, and author. He was a columnist for Guardian US from August 2012 to October 2013.[1][2][3] He was a columnist for Salon.com from 2007 to 2012, and an occasional contributor to The Guardian.[4][5][6] Greenwald worked as a constitutional and civil rights litigator. At Salon he contributed as a columnist and blogger, focusing on political and legal topics.[7] He has also contributed to other newspapers and political news magazines, including The New York Times,[8][9][10] the Los Angeles Times,[11] The American Conservative,[12] The National Interest,[13] and In These Times.[14][15] Early life and education[edit] Career[edit] Litigation attorney[edit] Businessman[edit] In 2002, Greenwald was offered the partnership in a consulting company, Master Notions Inc., by a friend, Jason Buchtel. Unclaimed Territory[edit] Salon[edit] The Guardian[edit] First Look Media and The Intercept[edit] Books[edit]

Julian Assange Early life Assange was born in Townsville. Hacking In September 1991, he was discovered hacking into the Melbourne master terminal of Nortel, a Canadian multinational telecommunications.[9] The Australian Federal Police tapped Assange's phone line (he was using a modem), raided his home at the end of October,[36][37] and eventually charged him in 1994 with thirty-one counts of hacking and related crimes.[9] Trax and Prime Suspect were each charged with a smaller number of offences.[38] In December 1996, he pleaded guilty to twenty-five charges (the other six were dropped), and was ordered to pay reparations of A$2,100 and released on a good behaviour bond,[9][34][39][40][41][42] avoiding a heavier penalty due to the perceived absence of malicious or mercenary intent and his disrupted childhood.[39][40][43][44] Programming WikiLeaks Assange, c. 2006 After his period of study at the University of Melbourne, Assange and others established WikiLeaks in 2006. U.S. legal position

Bradley Manning faces 52 years in jail | World news Bradley Manning will wake up tomorrow, at a military base in Virginia, to his 189th day in custody for the alleged leak of more than 250,000 diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. Manning, 23, a US army intelligence analyst brought up in the Oklahoma Bible belt and west Wales, is locked up with about half a dozen others in the marine-run facility in Quantico. He has had access to TV news and briefings from his lawyer, but little can have prepared him for the fury of the government he served about the impact of the cables leak. Hillary Clinton, the secretary of state, said it "tore at the fabric of government" and pledged "aggressive steps to hold responsible those who stole this information". Republicans branded it terrorism. He is said by friends to be on antidepressants and only a limited list of visitors are able to see him, yet one who saw him in recent weeks told the Guardian he was "doing surprisingly well, he is in high spirits". But who is Bradley Manning, and what motivated him?

Vladimir Lenin Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Улья́нов; IPA: [vlɐˈdʲimʲɪr ɪˈlʲitɕ ʊˈlʲanəf]), alias Lenin (/ˈlɛnɪn/;[2] Russian: Ле́нин; IPA: [ˈlʲenʲɪn]) (22 April [O.S. 10 April] 1870 – 21 January 1924) was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist. He served as head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1917, and of the Soviet Union from 1922 until his death. Under his administration, the Russian Empire was replaced by the Soviet Union; all wealth including land, industry and business was confiscated. Based in Marxism, his political theories are known as Leninism. Lenin, along with Leon Trotsky, played a senior role in orchestrating the October Revolution in 1917, which led to the overthrow of the Provisional Government and the establishment of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic. Early life Childhood: 1870–87 University and political radicalism: 1887–93 Revolutionary activities The 1905 Revolution: 1905–07

Edward Snowden In 2013, Snowden was hired by an NSA contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, after previous employment with Dell and the CIA.[4] On May 20, 2013, Snowden flew to Hong Kong after leaving his job at an NSA facility in Hawaii and in early June he revealed thousands of classified NSA documents to journalists Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewen MacAskill. Snowden came to international attention after stories based on the material appeared in The Guardian and The Washington Post. Further disclosures were made by other newspapers including Der Spiegel and The New York Times. On June 21, 2013, the U.S. A subject of controversy, Snowden has been variously called a hero, a whistleblower, a dissident, a patriot and a traitor. Background Childhood, family, and education Edward Joseph Snowden was born on June 21, 1983,[7] in Elizabeth City, North Carolina.[8] His maternal grandfather, Edward J. Political views Career Employment at CIA NSA sub-contractee as an employee for Dell Global surveillance disclosures

Adrian Lamo Lamo first gained media attention for breaking into several high-profile computer networks, including those of The New York Times, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, culminating in his 2003 arrest.[4] In 2010, Lamo reported U.S. soldier PFC Bradley Manning (now known as Chelsea Manning) to federal authorities, claiming that Manning had leaked hundreds of thousands of sensitive U.S. government documents to WikiLeaks. Manning was arrested and incarcerated in the U.S. military justice system and later sentenced to 35 years in confinement.[5][6] Early life and education[edit] In the mid-1990s, Lamo became a volunteer for the gay and lesbian media firm PlanetOut.com.[14][17] In 1998, Lamo was appointed to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning Youth Task Force by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.[18][19] During this period, in 2001, he overdosed on prescription amphetamines.[1][20] Activities and legal issues[edit] Security compromise[edit] DNA controversy[edit] See also[edit]

Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is an activist and former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers. Ellsberg was charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 along with other charges of theft and conspiracy, carrying a total maximum sentence of 115 years. Due to gross governmental misconduct and illegal evidence gathering, and the defense by Leonard Boudin and Harvard Law School professor Charles Nesson, Judge Byrne dismissed all charges against Ellsberg on May 11, 1973. Ellsberg was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 2006. Early life and career[edit] Ellsberg entered Harvard University on a scholarship, graduating summa cum laude with an A.B. in economics in 1952. Disaffection with Vietnam War[edit] The Pentagon Papers[edit]

In his own words: 'This belongs in the public domain' | World news On 21 May this year, Bradley Manning initiated a series of online chats with former hacker Adrian Lamo. Below are edited excerpts that took place over several days, and which Lamo gave to Wired.com (and to the FBI). Dates are approximate. May 21 (1:41:12 pm) Bradley Manning: hi (1:44:04 pm) Manning: how are you? (1:47:01 pm) Manning: im an army intelligence analyst, deployed to eastern baghdad, pending discharge for "adjustment disorder" [. . .] (1:56:24 pm) Manning: im sure you're pretty busy… (1:58:31 pm) Manning: if you had unprecedented access to classified networks 14 hours a day 7 days a week for 8+ months, what would you do? May 22 Manning apparently told Lamo that he had provided WikiLeaks with 260,000 classified diplomatic cables (as well videos of a 2007 airstrike in Iraq and a 2009 airstrike in Afghanistan). (1:39:03 pm) Manning: i cant believe what im confessing to you :'( Later, Manning discussed his role as a source for WikiLeaks and his links with its founder Julian Assange.

Xenophon Xenophon (/ˈzɛnəfən/; Greek: Ξενοφῶν, Xenophōn, Greek pronunciation: [ksenopʰɔ̂ːn]; c. 430 – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates. While not referred to as a philosopher by his contemporaries, his status as such is recently a popular topic of debate. He is known for writing about the history of his own times, the late 5th and early 4th centuries BC, especially for his account of the final years of the Peloponnesian War. His Hellenica, which recounts these times, is considered to be the continuation of Thucydides’ The Peloponnesian War. His youthful participation in the failed campaign of Cyrus the Younger to claim the Persian throne inspired him to write about the Persian empire and its history. Life[edit] Early years[edit] Little is known about Xenophon other than what he wrote about himself. Anabasis[edit] Expedition with Cyrus[edit] Return[edit] Exile and Death[edit]

After Senate vote, NSA prepares to shut down phone tracking program Hours after the Senate balked at reauthorizing the bulk collection of U.S. telephone records, the National Security Agency began shutting down a controversial program Saturday that senior intelligence and law enforcement officials say is vital to track terrorists in the United States. The Senate had debated into early predawn hours Saturday but failed to reach a deal to reform the program or extend its life beyond May 31, when the law used to authorize it is set to expire. Lawmakers then left on a weeklong recess, vowing to return at the end of it to try again in a rare Sunday session. Administration officials said later that they had to start the lengthy procedure of winding down the counter-terrorism program in anticipation of Congress failing to act. “That process has begun,” an administration official said Saturday. The data include the number dialed, duration, date and time for most telephone calls made by Americans. Opponents of the program, including presidential candidate Sen.

WikiLeaks: Collateral Murder, with ov...

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