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Bradley Manning

Bradley Manning
Assigned in 2009 to an Army unit in Iraq as an intelligence analyst, Manning had access to classified databases. In early 2010, she leaked classified information to WikiLeaks and confided this to Adrian Lamo, an online acquaintance. Lamo informed Army Counterintelligence, and Manning was arrested in May that same year. The material included videos of the July 12, 2007 Baghdad airstrike, and the 2009 Granai airstrike in Afghanistan; 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables; and 500,000 Army reports that came to be known as the Iraq War logs and Afghan War logs. Reaction to Manning's disclosures, arrest, and sentence was mixed. Background Early life Born Bradley Edward Manning in 1987 in Crescent, Oklahoma, she was the second child of Susan Fox, originally from Wales, and Brian Manning, an American. Manning's father took a job as an information technology (IT) manager for a rental car agency, which meant he had to travel. Parents' divorce, move to Wales Return to the United States Military service Related:  Persons of Interest

Julian Assange Early life Assange was born in Townsville. Hacking In September 1991, he was discovered hacking into the Melbourne master terminal of Nortel, a Canadian multinational telecommunications.[9] The Australian Federal Police tapped Assange's phone line (he was using a modem), raided his home at the end of October,[36][37] and eventually charged him in 1994 with thirty-one counts of hacking and related crimes.[9] Trax and Prime Suspect were each charged with a smaller number of offences.[38] In December 1996, he pleaded guilty to twenty-five charges (the other six were dropped), and was ordered to pay reparations of A$2,100 and released on a good behaviour bond,[9][34][39][40][41][42] avoiding a heavier penalty due to the perceived absence of malicious or mercenary intent and his disrupted childhood.[39][40][43][44] Programming WikiLeaks Assange, c. 2006 After his period of study at the University of Melbourne, Assange and others established WikiLeaks in 2006. U.S. legal position

Vladimir Lenin Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Улья́нов; IPA: [vlɐˈdʲimʲɪr ɪˈlʲitɕ ʊˈlʲanəf]), alias Lenin (/ˈlɛnɪn/;[2] Russian: Ле́нин; IPA: [ˈlʲenʲɪn]) (22 April [O.S. 10 April] 1870 – 21 January 1924) was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist. He served as head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1917, and of the Soviet Union from 1922 until his death. Under his administration, the Russian Empire was replaced by the Soviet Union; all wealth including land, industry and business was confiscated. Lenin, along with Leon Trotsky, played a senior role in orchestrating the October Revolution in 1917, which led to the overthrow of the Provisional Government and the establishment of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic. After his death, there was a struggle for power in the Soviet Union between two major factions, namely Stalin's and the Left Opposition (with Trotsky as de facto leader). Early life Red Terror

Obama Justice Department indicts ex-CIA agent for exposing torture 7 April 2012 Thursday’s indictment of John Kiriakou for exposing CIA torture of detainees confirms yet again that the Obama administration is continuing and deepening the crimes carried out by the Bush White House. Kiriakou, a CIA agent for 14 years, is being prosecuted for speaking to two journalists about the waterboarding of Abu Zubaydah. In December 2007, he appeared in an ABC News interview, becoming the first CIA official to confirm the use of waterboarding of so-called “enemy combatants” and to describe the practice as torture. It is now known that Zubaydah was waterboarded 83 times in the space of one month while being held in a series of CIA “black sites” from Thailand to Poland to Diego Garcia. The WSWS needs your support! Your donations go directly to financing, improving, and expanding the web site. Donate At some point during this ordeal, the CIA removed Zubaydah’s left eye. Yet, after a decade of imprisonment and torture, the government refuses to either try or release him.

Manning 'Guilty' on Most Counts, Faces 100 Years in Prison Manning supporters outside Fort Meade, Tuesday (Photo via Twitter / Ed Pilkington) Pfc. Bradley Manning, the army whistleblower who exposed egregious U.S. war crimes after revealing military documents to the website WikiLeaks, has been found guilty of almost all of his charges in a military court in Fort Meade, Maryland and could face a maximum of more than 100 years in jail. On Tuesday, Judge Col. Manning's official sentencing phase begins Wednesday morning at 9:30 EST. Watch Democracy Now! Follow live tweets from journalist following the trial here: As reporter Kevin Gosztola points out , the verdict comes on the anniversary of the U.S.' During the trial, Manning’s civilian defense attorney, David Coombs, had argued , “No case has ever been prosecuted under this type of theory, that an individual by the nature of giving information to a journalistic organization would then be charged with 'aiding the enemy.'"

Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is an activist and former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers. Ellsberg was charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 along with other charges of theft and conspiracy, carrying a total maximum sentence of 115 years. Due to gross governmental misconduct and illegal evidence gathering, and the defense by Leonard Boudin and Harvard Law School professor Charles Nesson, Judge Byrne dismissed all charges against Ellsberg on May 11, 1973. Ellsberg was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 2006. He is also known for popularizing part of decision theory, the Ellsberg paradox. Early life and career[edit] On his return from South Vietnam, Ellsberg resumed working at RAND. The Pentagon Papers[edit]

Xenophon Xenophon (/ˈzɛnəfən/; Greek: Ξενοφῶν, Xenophōn, Greek pronunciation: [ksenopʰɔ̂ːn]; c. 430 – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates. While not referred to as a philosopher by his contemporaries, his status as such is recently a popular topic of debate. He is known for writing about the history of his own times, the late 5th and early 4th centuries BC, especially for his account of the final years of the Peloponnesian War. His Hellenica, which recounts these times, is considered to be the continuation of Thucydides’ The Peloponnesian War. Life[edit] Early years[edit] Little is known about Xenophon other than what he wrote about himself. Anabasis[edit] Expedition with Cyrus[edit] Under the pretext of fighting Tissaphernes, the Persian satrap of Ionia, Cyrus assembled a massive army composed of native Persian soldiers, but also a large number of Greeks. Return[edit]

The National Security Agency’s Domestic Spying Program By Laura Poitras The Program: The filmmaker Laura Poitras profiles William Binney, a 32-year veteran of the National Security Agency who helped design a top-secret program he says is broadly collecting Americans’ personal data. Two weeks later, driving past the headquarters of the N.S.A. in Maryland, outside Washington, Mr. Binney described details about Stellar Wind, the N.S.A.’s top-secret domestic spying program begun after 9/11, which was so controversial that it nearly caused top Justice Department officials to resign in protest , in 2004. “The decision must have been made in September 2001,” Mr. Binney told me and the cinematographer Kirsten Johnson. To those who understand state surveillance as an abstraction, I will try to describe a little about how it has affected me. The 2008 amendments to the , which oversees the N.S.A. activities, are up for renewal in December.

Transcript | US v Pfc. Manning, Article 39(a) Session, 11/08/12 For more information on the lack of public and press access to United States v. Pfc. Manning, visit the Center for Constitutional Rights, which filed a petition requesting the Army Court of Criminal Appeals (ACCA) "to order the Judge to grant the public and press access to the government's motion papers, the court's own orders, and transcripts of proceedings, none of which have been made public to date." This transcript of the Article 39(a) Session held on November 8, 2012 at Fort Meade, Maryland in US v Pfc. Judge: Army Col. Judge Lind Please be seated. Prosecution (Fein) [Appellate exhibit 379] ....after [yesterday's] session, defense and the Government [had a] discussion. [This next part concerns interrogatories from the defense to the prosecution concerning the Speedy Trial motion. ...because of all that an unanticipated number of questions from defense...prosecution has asked Court for motion to leave...26 November to 5 December to answer 137 questions. Defense (Coombs) Granted. No...

Sibel Edmonds Sibel Deniz Edmonds is a former Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) translator and founder of the National Security Whistleblowers Coalition (NSWBC). Edmonds gained public attention following her firing from her position as a language specialist at the FBI's Washington Field Office in March 2002. She had accused a colleague of covering up illicit activity involving foreign nationals, alleged serious security breaches and cover-ups and that intelligence had been deliberately suppressed, endangering national security. Her later claims gained her awards and fame as a whistleblower.[1] In March 2012, she published a memoir, titled Classified Woman – The Sibel Edmonds Story.[2] Edmonds testified before the 9/11 Commission, but her testimony was excluded from the official 567 page 9/11 Commission Report.[3] Edmonds is also the founder and publisher of the Boiling Frogs Post, an online media site that aims to offer nonpartisan investigative journalism.[4] Early life and education[edit] Sibel D.

Lists of Note By 1914, Albert Einstein 's marriage to his wife of 11 years, Mileva Marić , was fast deteriorating. Realising there was no hope for their relationship on a romantic level, Einstein proposed that they remain together for the sake of their children, but only if she agree to the following list of conditions. Mileva accepted them, but to no avail. A few months later, she left her husband in Berlin and moved, with their sons, to Zurich. They eventually divorced in 1919, having lived apart for five years. You will make sure: that my clothes and laundry are kept in good order; that I will receive my three meals regularly ; that my bedroom and study are kept neat, and especially that my desk is left for . You will renounce all personal relations with me insofar as they are not completely necessary for social reasons. my sitting at home with you; my going out or travelling with you. You will obey the following points in your relations with me: you will stop talking to me if I request it;

Charges Against the N.S.A.’s Thomas Drake On June 13th, a fifty-four-year-old former government employee named Thomas Drake is scheduled to appear in a courtroom in Baltimore, where he will face some of the gravest charges that can be brought against an American citizen. A former senior executive at the National Security Agency, the government’s electronic-espionage service, he is accused, in essence, of being an enemy of the state. According to a ten-count indictment delivered against him in April, 2010, Drake violated the Espionage Act—the 1917 statute that was used to convict Aldrich Ames, the C.I.A. officer who, in the eighties and nineties, sold U.S. intelligence to the K.G.B., enabling the Kremlin to assassinate informants. The government argues that Drake recklessly endangered the lives of American servicemen. Top officials at the Justice Department describe such leak prosecutions as almost obligatory. One afternoon in January, Drake met with me, giving his first public interview about this case.

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