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Conflict Resolution - Resolving conflict rationally and effectively - Leadership training from MindTools

Conflict Resolution - Resolving conflict rationally and effectively - Leadership training from MindTools
Using the "Interest-Based Relational" Approach Resolve conflict effectively by treating everybody involved with respect. Conflict is an inevitable part of work. We've all seen situations where people with different goals and needs have clashed, and we've all witnessed the often intense personal animosity that can result. The fact that conflict exists, however, is not necessarily a bad thing. When you resolve it effectively, you can also eliminate many of the hidden problems that it brought to the surface. There are other benefits that you might not expect, such as: Increased understanding. But conflict can also be damaging. If you want to keep your team members working effectively, despite coming into conflict with one another, you need to stop this downward spiral as soon as you can. The Interest-Based Relational Approach . Roger Fisher and William Ury developed the IBR approach and published it in their 1981 book, "Getting to Yes." and empathetically , be emotionally intelligent techniques.

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Conflict Resolution Skills: Turning Conflicts into Opportunities Understanding conflict in relationships Conflict arises from differences, both large and small. It occurs whenever people disagree over their values, motivations, perceptions, ideas, or desires. Sometimes these differences appear trivial, but when a conflict triggers strong feelings, a deep personal need is often at the core of the problem. These needs can be a need to feel safe and secure, a need to feel respected and valued, or a need for greater closeness and intimacy. Stress Management: How to Reduce, Prevent, and Cope with Stress Identify the sources of stress in your life Stress management starts with identifying the sources of stress in your life. This isn’t as easy as it sounds. Your true sources of stress aren’t always obvious, and it’s all too easy to overlook your own stress-inducing thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Sure, you may know that you’re constantly worried about work deadlines.

How To Make Difficult Conversations Easy Someone is screaming in your face at the top of their lungs. Or ranting angrily and you can’t get a word in edgewise. Or maybe they’re sobbing so hard you can barely understand what they’re saying. We’ve all been there. These situations don’t happen a lot (thank god) but we all feel helpless when they do. And because they’re rare we don’t ever seem to get better at handling them.

Entre Leadership Podcast When it comes to talking about their companies, most small business owners don’t know where to start—until now. We’re talking with best-selling author Donald Miller about why you need to tell your company’s story and how to do it well so that you can effectively spread your message. End of story? Don’t miss this interview! Additional resources: FREE EntreLeader’s Guide to Hiring

How to have difficult conversations that produce positive results SmartBlogs This post is part of the series “Communication,” a weeklong effort co-hosted by SmartBrief’s SmartBlog on Leadership and the folks at Switch & Shift. Keep track of the series here and check out our daily e-mail newsletter, SmartBrief on Leadership. Don’t subscribe? Sign up. Breaking bad news — especially when it affects peoples’ lives, careers or jobs — is never easy. Portland State University Department of Conflict Resolution The Conflict Resolution Graduate Program offers either a Master of Arts or Master of Sciences degree. Both degrees draw from and contribute to theories and insights in the field, as well as preparing students for professional work. The program currently offers the following areas of concentration:

Positive psychology To Martin Seligman, psychology (particularly its positive branch) can investigate and promote realistic ways of fostering more joy in individuals and communities. Positive psychology is a recent branch of psychology whose purpose was summed up in 1998 by Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: "We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise, which achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving individuals, families, and communities."[1] Positive psychologists seek "to find and nurture genius and talent" and "to make normal life more fulfilling",[2] rather than merely treating mental illness.

Fundamental attribution error In social psychology, the fundamental attribution error, also known as the correspondence bias or attribution effect, is the tendency for people to place an undue emphasis on internal characteristics (personality) to explain someone else's behavior in a given situation rather than considering the situation's external factors. It does not explain interpretations of one's own behavior, where situational factors are more easily recognized and can thus be taken into consideration. Conversely, from the other perspective, this error is known as the actor–observer bias, in which people tend to overemphasize the role of a situation in their behaviors and underemphasize the role of their own personalities. Examples[edit] Shut Up and Listen (And Other Advice for First-Time Leaders) Unless you’re a solo freelancer, chances are you will eventually be thrust into a leadership position. As creatives, we must embrace this challenge and not shy away from it, as a fear of being a leader can subconsciously hold us back from advancing in our career. Being entrusted with a leadership role in your workplace requires a shift in mindset. Leaders cannot afford to compartmentalize like the worker. They must simultaneously juggle the long- and short-term while inspiring those around them to do great work.

Basics of Conflict Management Clarifying Confusion About Conflict Types of Managerial Actions That Cause Workplace Conflicts Key Managerial Actions / Structures to Minimize Conflicts Ways People Deal With Conflict To Manage a Conflict with Another Person Additional Perspectives on Conflict Management General Resources About Conflict Management Also see Related Library Topics Note that many methods intended for addressing conflict between two people also might be considered as methods to address group conflict. Therefore, also see Conflict Management in Groups. Learn More in the Library's Blogs Related to Conflict Management

Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution — Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution — Georgia State University Restorative Justice Project Cited FairnessWorks.com editor Ken Kimsey urged readers this week to explore and submit entries to WhatIsRestorativeJustice.org, an online database project led by Carolyn Benne as part of CNCR. More » CNCR teaches mediation at Birmingham City University in UK As a member of the Higher Education Funding Council of England’s Improving Dispute Resolution Project, Jill Scott attended CNCR’s Summer Institute and immediately saw the benefits of mediation in her role as Equality and Diversity Advisor at Birmingham City University, UK. More »

Free self help psychology videos How to Wake Up Bright and Breezy Published 06 October, 2011 | Sleep Problems Have you ever noticed that the average amount of sleep people seem to need is always 'five more minutes'? The dreaded alarm goes off or your partner yells at you to WAKE UP! Ultimate attribution error The ultimate attribution error is a group-level attribution error that offers an explanation for how one person views different causes of negative and positive behavior in ingroup and outgroup members.[1] Ultimate attribution error is the tendency to internally attribute negative outgroup and positive ingroup behaviour and to externally attribute positive outgroup and negative ingroup behaviour. So in other words, ultimate attribution error arises as a way to explain an outgroup's negative behaviour as flaws in their personality, and to explain an outgroup's positive behaviour as a result of chance or circumstance. It is also the belief that positive acts performed by ingroup members are as a result of their personality, whereas, if an ingroup member behaves negatively (which is believed to be rare), it is a result of situational factors.[2]

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