background preloader

How Communism Works"

How Communism Works"
In a perfect world, everyone would have food and shelter, and a true utopian society would be devoid of sexism, racism and other forms of oppression. But for most of the world's population, this perfect society just isn't possible. Communism is one proposed solution to these problems. Most people know what communism is at its most basic level. Simply put, communism is the idea that everyone in a given society receives equal shares of the benefits derived from labor. According to the philosopher Frederick Engels' "Principles of Communism," the plan for ultimate financial and social equality is built on the principle that the system should spread around the world until all countries are on board [source: Engels]. Who are communists, and why do non-communist cultures consider them radical? Related:  organisations et leadership

24 charts of leadership styles around the world Different cultures can have radically different leadership styles, and international organizations would do well to understand them. British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted these differences in his book "When Cultures Collide," first published in 1996 and now in its third edition, and he teaches these insights in seminars with major corporate clients. From structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan, the charts seem intuitively correct, if not unilaterally true across a country. Lewis acknowledges the risks of dealing in stereotypes: "Determining national characteristics is treading a minefield of inaccurate assessment and surprising exception. There is, however, such a thing as a national norm." With permission from the author, we are posting 24 charts of leadership styles from his book, with a brief summary of his comments about each below: crossculture.com Swedish management is decentralized and democratic. German managers strive to create a perfect system.

Rachel Maddow: Obama Has Accomplished 85% of First Term Agenda in 2 Years - StumbleUpon On her MSNBC program last night Rachel Maddow highlighted an often overlooked fact concerning the presidency of Barack Obama. Maddow said, “By my estimation it is halftime, right, in the first term and with this vote tomorrow they will have gone 85% of the distance they said they wanted to go in the first term of the president.” Here is the video of the segment from MSNBC: Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy Maddow hailed the passage of START as victory for Obama, “If this treaty gets ratified tomorrow, it will be political malpractice to not call it an unqualified victory for this president and for this presidency. She highlight the ways that this is a win for Obama, “Getting this treaty ratified is a huge victory for President Obama and something that Republicans said they would deny him. Later Rachel Maddow delivered the kicker, “There are big things this administration said that it wanted to do that it hasn’t done yet.

Infographic: United States of the Environment In the spirit of two popular infographics that map out the best and worst of all 50 U.S. states — the United States of Awesome and the United States of Shame — MNN decided to see how each state shines or suffers in regard to environmental and public health. Our "United States of the Environment" maps depict each state's No. 1 and No. 50 ranking for issues such as conservation, agriculture, energy efficiency, disease prevalence, pollution, natural resource availability and education, among others. Check out the two maps below, and see our list of states, stats and sources for more information. Sources for "good U.S." map:Alabama: Lowest rate of alcohol abuse or dependence (U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) Alaska: Most wetlands (U.S.

The Dystopian Society Libya is not Iraq: Three Victories in Tripoli As is often noted, we all have a tendency to fight the previous war. Just as the 'quagmire' of Vietnam led to reluctance to intervene in Bosnia (at the cost of hundreds of thousands of lives), so too the successes of Kosovo led to the peremptory and ill planned interventionism of Iraq. But Libya is not Iraq. As jubilant crowds fill Green Square, the fall of Tripoli to the rebels is a victory on many counts A Victory for the Libyan People The revolutions in the Mashriq and Maghreb were not inspired by sleeper cells or CIA plotting. Back in March, one of the figures who inspired me to believe in the Libyan people's struggle, and to support the Nato led intervention, was a young brilliant man, Mohammed Nabbous. The Voices from the StreetOne of those I've been listening to is the brave young journalist from Benghazi, Mohammed Nabbous, an important figure in the February 17th Revolution, who ran his own website Libya Alhurra. Mo's memory has been vindicated tonight. 1.

American Psychosis The United States, locked in the kind of twilight disconnect that grips dying empires, is a country entranced by illusions. It spends its emotional and intellectual energy on the trivial and the absurd. It is captivated by the hollow stagecraft of celebrity culture as the walls crumble. This celebrity culture giddily licenses a dark voyeurism into other people’s humiliation, pain, weakness and betrayal. Day after day, one lurid saga after another, whether it is Michael Jackson, Britney Spears [or Miley Cyrus], enthralls the country … despite bank collapses, wars, mounting poverty or the criminality of its financial class. The virtues that sustain a nation-state and build community, from honesty to self-sacrifice to transparency to sharing, are ridiculed each night on television as rubes stupid enough to cling to this antiquated behavior are voted off reality shows. It is the cult of self that is killing the United States.

How The Most Powerful People Get Things Done: 4 Tips From A White House Staffer We all have big decisions to make and deadlines to meet. And sometimes it can feel overwhelming. This got me wondering: how do the most powerful people get things done? When lives are on the line, literally trillions of dollars are at stake and the world is watching… how do people handle those situations? So I called my friend James Waters. James was Deputy Director of Scheduling at the White House and served in government for 10 years. James had some tremendous insights about how they do things at The White House that line up with a lot of what the formal research is telling us. Now if you’re looking for Republicans-this, Democrats-that, you’ve come to the wrong place. Let’s get to it. Be Responsive It ain’t like an episode of “The West Wing.” Watching that show you might think that 5 people get everything done. How do you make insanely big decisions with such a huge number of people involved? We all know people who have 1000 unread emails in their inbox or don’t pick up their phone. Sum Up

Tibet: Culture on the Edge Written by Phil Borges - Rizzoli New York - Rizzoli New York Written by Phil Borges October 4, 2011 Hardcover Photography - Individual Photographers - Essays Rizzoli 12-1/2 x 9 About This Book Firsthand accounts and spectacular photographs combine to form a fascinating portrait of the endangered Tibetan people, their plateau, and their cultural landscape. Photographer Phil Borges uses individual stories and portraits to illustrate how dramatic development, climate change, and the deep devotion of the Tibetan people are interacting to transform Tibetan culture. About the Author has lived with and documented indigenous and tribal cultures around the world for twenty-five years, and his photographs are exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide.

World debt comparison: The global debt clock Jus post bellum Jus post bellum (Latin for "Justice after war") deals with the termination phase of war. The idea was written about by Brian Orend to reflect the need for rules to end wars completely and fairly. The jus post bellum has also become a subject of interest for international lawyers concerned with transitions from conflict to peace. Purpose[edit] Provide assurances to combatants about the terms necessary to end a conflictProvide terms for the end of war; once the rights of a political community have been vindicated, further continuation of war becomes an act of aggressionProvide guidelines for the construction of peace treatiesPrevent continuous fighting throughout peace negotiations by belligerents trying to gain more favorable terms.Prevent draconian and vengeful peace terms; the rights a just state fights for in a war provide the constraints on what can be demanded from the defeated belligerent Just Settlement of a Just War[edit] See also[edit] Just War Theory References[edit]

100 Best (Free) Science Documentaries Online | Online Universities - StumbleUpon No matter how much you know, there is always something new to learn about science. While your college courses may cover the basics, you can get a more in-depth look at a wide variety of topics from Internet resources such as these great documentaries. These selections will help you explore everything from the inner reaches of the human mind to the outer areas of our universe and just about everything else in between. Better yet, they’re all free to watch online so you can learn more without spending a dime. Health and Medicine These documentaries cover topics like health care, diseases, nutrition, nursing, and more so you can get great insights into health and medicine. Super Size Me: In this movie, filmmaker Morgan Spurlock attempts to subsist on only a diet of McDonald’s for a full month. Drugs Learn how drugs impact the brain and the variety of legal restrictions imposed upon them from these documentaries. Genetics Evolution and Biological History Physics The Quantum Revolution: Dr. Geology

What is Traitorware? Your digital camera may embed metadata into photographs with the camera's serial number or your location. Your printer may be incorporating a secret code on every page it prints which could be used to identify the printer and potentially the person who used it. If Apple puts a particularly creepy patent it has recently applied for into use, you can look forward to a day when your iPhone may record your voice, take a picture of your location, record your heartbeat, and send that information back to the mothership. This is traitorware: devices that act behind your back to betray your privacy. Perhaps the most notable example of traitorware was the Sony rootkit. Traitorware is sometimes included in products with less obviously malicious intent. Traitorware is not some science-fiction vision of the future.

Malthusian Theory of Population Thomas Robert Malthus was the first economist to propose a systematic theory of population. He articulated his views regarding population in his famous book, Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), for which he collected empirical data to support his thesis. Malthus had the second edition of his book published in 1803, in which he modified some of his views from the first edition, but essentially his original thesis did not change. In Essay on the Principle of Population,Malthus proposes the principle that human populations grow exponentially (i.e., doubling with each cycle) while food production grows at an arithmetic rate (i.e. by the repeated addition of a uniform increment in each uniform interval of time). Thus, while food output was likely to increase in a series of twenty-five year intervals in the arithmetic progression 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and so on, population was capable of increasing in the geometric progression 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and so forth.

Related: