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15 Ideal Color Combinations to Make You Look Great Combining the right colors is crucial for getting that perfect look. That’s why Bright Side decided to share this crib sheet to make sure you won’t make a mistake when choosing your outfit. For pink jeans Coral with black A bright look for summer Teachers' Visual Guide to Using Google Calendar April , 2014 Google Calendar is one of the best free web tools I have been using for few years now. As a teacher, you can use Google Calendar for a wide variety of purposes. You can for instance create events and share them with your students and parents; you can use it to share important dates and information with students.

Janet Iwasa HIV entry and egress Chromatin remodeling Visualizing neurons Molecular flipbook Cell image library Crystallized Icicle Ornaments with Borax Have you ever made “ice crystals” with Borax and Pipecleaners? It’s a classic science experiment for kids, but believe it or not, until last week, we hadn’t done it before. We decided to give it a try, and we made these Crystallized Icicle Ornaments, and I have to tell you, it I was really impressed! You can make your own crystallized ornaments with just a couple of common house hold supplies.

Door Here’s some ideas for how you could use the Hour of Code to engage and excite your colleagues, children and their parents. Many of you will be familiar with the Hour of Code and the great resources on Two years ago, the Hour of Code resources provided a great introduction to programming at a time when the computing curriculum was still very new. We’ve moved on from those days, but getting all teachers to feel confident to tech the new curriculum is still a challenge in many schools. 1) Organise a lunchtime session for all the staff. The 10 best classroom tools for gathering feedback Getting feedback from your students can serve multiple purposes: it can help you understand your students’ comprehension of the material, it can give you insight into what teaching methods work or don’t work, and it can help engage students in their learning process by knowing they have a voice that is heard. Not only can feedback offer insight for both teachers and students, it can be an integral part of group work and classroom time, given the plethora of connected devices in the hands of our students these days. That said, there are a lot of classroom tools available for gathering feedback. You can poll students or have them create a survey for a project, use clickers and other classroom response type tools in real time, get feedback on teaching methods, and more.

5 great apps for fun lessons The ideal app can be just the thing to make a great lesson perfect. Here, educational psychologist and learning apps specialist Peter Maxwell lists five of his favourites. Apple have produced a series of ebooks to help teachers integrate apps into their daily classroom practice. The Apps in the Classroom series is inspired by Apple Distinguished Educators, and each book contains a collection of activities that allow students to utilize a particular app to demonstrate their learning. The books begin with an overview of the app in question before detailing possible activities.

Online Video Streaming Archive For selected articles and letters Nature presents streaming videos featuring interviews with scientists behind the research and analysis from Nature editors. To view the videos you will need the free Flash browser plugin. You can also visit the Nature Video YouTube channel which enables you to easily embed and share our videos through websites, mobile devices, blogs and email. Tell us what you think of Nature's online video at nature@nature.com. Glaciers lost in time Nature Video explores how recreating old photographs is helping to reveal the secrets of Greenland’s disappearing glaciers.

Spun Glass Caterpillar: A Real Life Crystal Creature Habitat: found from New York to Florida and west to Colorado and Texas Status: No Conservation Concerns No, this isn’t a Swarovski crystal creation, but it very well could be! Instead, it’s a Spun Glass Caterpillar (Isochaetes beutenmuelleri) that has dozens of glittering, almost frosty-looking, spines radiating from its body.

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