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Grimm's Fairy Tales

Grimm's Fairy Tales
This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. (Some of the translations are slightly different, the arrangement also differs, and the Grimm's scholarly notes are not included.) The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. They have been restored in this edition, based on Hunt's titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker.

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/

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Gallery of mystery part 2 Peru bronze wheels, described by professor Rafael Larco Hoyle in his work "Peru"; they resemble very much modern gears. The famous "Kiev astronaut": it's the only European little statue found until now which shows so evident "spatial" features. Two prehistoric Japanese little statues: they represent creatures who wear special space-suits and big helmets joined to the space-suit by a sort of bolt collar. One of the two "helmets" (the one on the left) provided with enormous glasses, that resemble the polar glasses used to protect eyes from the light.

Bram Stoker Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there.

Make Google Go Crazy Make Google Go Crazy Here's what you need to do to make Google go crazy (this supposedly works for other websites too, though I only got it to work with Google): Go to Google.com Remove everything from the address bar, then copy & paste the following into it: javascript:R=0; x1=.1; y1=.05; x2=.25; y2=.24; x3=1.6; y3=.24; x4=300; y4=200; x5=300; y5=200; DI=document.images; DIL=DI.length; function A(){for(i=0; i-DIL; i++){DIS=DI[ i ].style; DIS.position='absolute'; DIS.left=Math.sin(R*x1+i*x2+x3)*x4+x5; DIS.top=Math.cos(R*y1+i*y2+y3)*y4+y5}R++}setInterval('A()',5); void(0); Hit enter. Enjoy. [Via Digg. Thanks Suresh S.!] 11 Most Ironically Banned Books Of All Time Saturday, September 26th through Saturday, October 3rd is the 27th annual National Banned Books Week, a week that opposes censorship, the Thought Police, and closeted gay "family values" types who sublimate their man-on-man urges through rampant and vigorous homophobia. Long time readers of this website will know I hate three things: Internet commenters who misuse your and you're... hypocrisy... and you're mom. Today's list is going after hypocrisy. (It would go after your mom, but her ass is too big to fit anything after it.) I searched through lists of books that have been banned at one time or another (mostly in the U.S.), and found the ones whose bans were the most hypocritical, ignorant, and, based on the content of the books, ironic. 1.

The Very Secret Diaries Welcome! Here you may find the brilliant "Very Secret Diary" series by the wonderful Cassandra Claire. These are also published in her LiveJournal, but she was kind enough to agree to let your humble servant here publish them here. Enjoy! And do be sure to check out her LiveJournal. History of the Illuminati The Illuminati trace their origins back thousands of years to their conception as a result of the genetic inbreeding between a reptilian extraterrestrial race and humanity. Their modern origin, however, traces back to the 1760s and a man named Adam Weishaupt, who defected from the Catholic church and organized the Illuminati, financed by the International Bankers. Since then, according to the Illuminati, their top goal has been to achieve a “one world government” and to subjugate all religions and governments in the process.

Dracula My gosh, it's full of sex! by Mysticmidget, January 10, 2013 I agree with "somethingisbrokehere". I read through this summary to aid in an essay about this book and was positively shocked...though it gave me plenty of giggles! How Things Used to Be You are visiting www.rawfoodinfo.com How Things Used To Be Hi friends, I don't know who wrote this article and some of it may not be accurate but it is still interesting musing... An Imagined Girls Night With Katniss Everdeen, Hermione Granger, Bella Swan And Buffy Summers In celebration of the release of The Hunger Games in theaters, I figured there was no better way to welcome Katniss Everdeen to the pantheon of pop culture heroines, than by imagining what it would be like to be a fly on the wall during Girls Night. Clearly, Carrie Bradshaw was not invited. Buffy: Hi girls! Thanks for joining me for this Heroines of Pop Culture ladies night.

Nine Major Ways Criminals Use Facebook This Friday, Facebook will go public in one of the most anticipated IPOs in history. With more than 900 million users, Mark Zuckerberg’s expanding social media empire has become a seemingly irreplaceable part of the online experience. Unfortunately, a byproduct of its success is that millions of Americans are far more exposed to a number of cyber crimes that also teem on the site. To be sure, cyber crimes have been occurring for some time, but the presence of social media has made many crimes much easier to commit.

Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time » Life-Changing Arts A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the

Rock Paper Scissors Spock Lizard I invented this game (with Karen Bryla) because it seems like when you know someone well enough, 75-80% of any Rock-Paper-Scissors games you play with that person end up in a tie. Well, here is a slight variation that reduces that probability. (Note that for those of you who like to swing your fist back and forth and say, "Rock, Paper, Scissors, GO!", might want to continue to do that, replacing "Rock" with "One," "Paper" with "Two," and "Scissors" with "Three.") This version is also nice because it satisfies the Law of Fives.

Douglas Hofstadter Douglas Richard Hofstadter (born February 15, 1945) is an American professor of cognitive science whose research focuses on the sense of "I",[2][3] consciousness, analogy-making, artistic creation, literary translation, and discovery in mathematics and physics. He is best known for his book Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, first published in 1979. It won both the Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction[4][5] and a National Book Award (at that time called The American Book Award) for Science.[6][a] His 2007 book I Am a Strange Loop won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science and Technology.[7][8][9] Early life and education[edit]

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth.

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