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10 great science fiction novels that have been banned

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned
@djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. But I'm also the child of a public school teacher and am familiar with my mother's and many of her peers' views on children's reading materials. Despite the generally conservative views in my community, my elementary school encouraged me to read A Wrinkle in Time and The Giver and Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach.

http://io9.com/5653504/10-great-science-fiction-novels-that-have-been-banned

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Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time » Life-Changing Arts A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the left of it.

Read the introduction Go ahead and multiply the number 8,388,628 x 2 in your head. Can you do it in a few seconds? There is a young man who can double that number 24 times in the space of a few seconds. He gets it right every time. There is a boy who can tell you the exact time of day at any moment, even in his sleep. There is a girl who can correctly determine the exact dimensions of an object 20 feet away. Phobos Entertainment's "100 Science Fiction Books You Just Have to Read" on Lists of Bests Take my word for it; all science fiction books are not created equal. All right, don’t take my word for it. You’ll figure it out when you plow through packed bookstore shelves. You’ll realize soon enough that not every writer pens a tale worth reading. So just how does one find stellar SF? For starters, why don’t you try out these 100 narrative works.

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Top 100 Fiction A contemporary list, with an international flavour and a respect for the classics, The Best Books: Top 100 Novels of All Time list contains many of the great works of fiction you'd expect, but with a few surprises to add a little spice to the collection. Which books would you omit and which would you add to our list? Please let us know in the comments section below. 1. Brave New World Your mega summer reading list: 70+ picks from the TED community Summer: the season for cracking open a good book under the shade of a tree. Below, we’ve compiled about 70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. Warning: not all of these books can be classified as beach reads. And we think that is a good thing.

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10 Science Fiction Novels That Will Definitely Never Be Movies by Charlie Jane Anders So they actually did it: They turned the sprawling, insane Cloud Atlas into a movie, one that actually makes the book look straightforward and uncontroversial. It just goes to show, no matter how unconventional or sprawling a book is, there’s a way to adapt that sucker into a movie. Except sometimes, no. Here are 10 science fiction books, by some of the genre’s greatest authors, that we are pretty darn sure will never be made into movies.

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