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TES Connect - Teaching Jobs, Teaching Resources & Community

TES Connect - Teaching Jobs, Teaching Resources & Community
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igiveagonski.com.au :: Home SCU - Centre for Children and Young People The 6 Characteristics of A Successful Educator Jessica Hagy, a contributor in Forbes, has made an excellent account of the 6 main characteristics of people you should be around. While checking her article I instantly remembered the article I wrote a year ago called the 21st century teacher skills. There is a huge similarity between the two but what really attracted me in Hagy's post and which pushes me to share it with you here is the awesome illustration she employed. She used some catchy sketches that are alone enough to give you the gist of it all. Going through her list I found out that those are the same characteristics educators and teachers need to look for and hence we entitled this post The 6 Characteristics of a Successful Educator. Hagy 's list is too general but I worked on it and added my own materials to make it teacher-focused. Read and share with your colleagues. 1- The Instigator 2-The Cheerleader This is normally your supporters and fans . 3- The Taskmaster 4- The Connector 5- The Doubter 6- The Example

Why Accountability Is Key To Building Rapport When students aren’t held accountable for misbehavior, they take advantage of it. They become brazen and disrespectful. They affect a cool, uncaring attitude. They take their sweet time responding to instruction. And no matter how hard the teacher tries to stay positive, no matter how earnestly she tries to build rapport with her students, resentment inevitably begins to surface. She starts taking their behavior personally. She becomes the teacher she never wanted to be. And thus, her relationship with her students becomes strained. Every day feels like a battle. The truth is, accountability is the foundation upon which positive relationships with students are built. For it is accountability—that which is defined by the fair use of a classroom management plan—that is key building rapport. Here’s why: Accountability protects students. A classroom management plan is a contract between you and your students that protects their right to learn and enjoy school. Accountability isn’t personal.

The 21 Signs you are A 21st Century Teacher Teaching in the 21st century is definitely not an easy task. Students are digitally focused and have more free access to information challenging thus the traditional prototypic picture of the teacher as the knowledge instigator. Engagement is also another serious issue that makes educating such kind of students a real nightmare. It takes so much creativity, originality, and novelty from the part of teachers to get students motivated and engaged. Technology has the cure but this cure can not be effective unless teachers know how to use its prescription. Another resource which I highly recommend for any 21st century teacher is the awesome learning community called Simple k-12. I am mentioning Simple K 12 here because what they offer clicks in with the general theme of Educational Technology and Mobile Learning and also because It is a an inestimable source for professional development for teachers and educators.

How to Get Kids to Work as a Team If the Adults Around Them Can't - Finding Common Ground "To get anywhere you have to build relationships with many different people-people who disagree with you, the skeptical and cynical. If you are to have any chance of progressing, you have to have enough empathy for their situation so that you can relate to them." Michael Fullan (The Moral Imperative Realized. P.6) Educators will tell you that teamwork is vitally important to moving forward, especially during our present times in education. Without a team teaching, building or district leadership can feel very lonely. Educators like to focus on 21st century skills or career and college readiness, depending on the phrase du jour. We often do that. We tell students that it's important to work together at the same time we may be ignoring someone who we do not like to work with, and that should cause some internal philosophical issues for all of us. Most people do not like conflict. We have all been there. Task master - This person always wants to get the job done.

Getting to Know You Each year one of my favorite first week of school activities helps me figure out my first quarter seating arrangement while also helping students get to know one another. I’ve done this with 3rd graders through seventh graders. I don’t have a name for it, but here is how it works: The first day of school as students enter the classroom they are instructed to find a seat anywhere they want. The second day of school after we have settled in for the day, I explain that we are going to change seats, so gather up your things. 1) You may not sit with anyone you have already sat with. 2) You may not sit at a table you have already occupied. 3) All tables must have at least one boy and one girl. 4) You SHOULD try to help by being willing to move so things can be worked out if someone is having trouble finding an appropriate seat. What happens next is that a few students quickly find a new table and sit down like they are playing musical chairs. Learning is messy!

The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Le One of the reasons that instructors tend to overemphasize "coverage" over "engaged thinking" is that they assume that answers can be taught separate from questions. Indeed, so buried are questions in established instruction that the fact that all assertions — all statements that this or that is so — are implicit answers to questions is virtually never recognized. For example, the statement that water boils at 100 degrees centigrade is an answer to the question "At what temperature centigrade does water boil?" Hence every declarative statement in the textbook is an answer to a question. Hence, every textbook could be rewritten in the interrogative mode by translating every statement into a question. Thinking is Driven by Questions Thinking is not driven by answers but by questions. Questions define tasks, express problems and delineate issues. This is why it is true that only students who have questions are really thinking and learning. Dead Questions Reflect Dead Minds

How ditching the desks turned my classroom into a 21st century learning space Image by author I spent a great deal of last year enamoured with the idea of modern learning environments. One of my placements was at a school which had a large awhina area (an indoor court-yard) shared by 4 classes as a break-out space. It was fantastic to have a space for the syndicate (group of 3-4 classes) to meet as well as a place for students to have a place work independently of the teacher. Coming into a more traditional classroom space with 28 of the flip-top style desks seemed rather daunting at the start of the year. While I had the advantage of an old cloak bay, where I put a couple of round tables in, I was stuck with what to do in my main classroom. In the end I went old school making a couple of rows pushed up right at the back of the room. Over time I tried different table configurations to improve the flow of the classroom but the desks forever seemed to be in the way. World-cafe style planning (Image by author) How can we make our classroom more like the library?

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