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Related:  Inspiration stories, Mystery & Skeptics

A Brief History of the Skeptic | Australian Skeptics Inc In January 1981 a new phenomenon burst upon the publishing scene. It was manifested in a four page, tabloid format newspaper, titled the Skeptic and it contained articles headed “Skeptics Test Psychic Surgeon”, “Doris Stokes Wrong — Police” and “Alien Honeycomb Tested”, among others. This issue was followed in August 1981 by No 2, in a new 16 page A4 format, and in November by No 3, also of 16 pages. Thus, in its first year of publication, the Skeptic comprised only three issues. From January 1982, the Skeptic became a quarterly magazine and has remained so ever since, with the number of pages gradually increasing to over 60 pages. Issues 1:1 to 3:1 were edited by Mark Plummer, then President of Australian Skeptics, with word processing carried out by Secretary, James Gerrand.

rolled paper flowers {tutorial} | jones design company Welcome to flower week – five days of simple and delightful flower projects. I could probably do three weeks of flowers because there are so many different ways to create them, but I’ve limited it to five of my current favorites. Before we get started, let me make a few disclaimers: 1. I find inspiration for projects all over the place {online, in shops, in magazines}, then figure out how to re-create them on my own. 2. 3. Okay, so let’s begin. Here’s what you’ll need: :: paper {either cover or text weight} :: florist wire :: scissors, pencil, glue gun STEP ONE: cut irregular circle This circle is approximately 8 inches, but you can do any size you wish. STEP TWO: cut spiral Start at the outside edge and cut in a spiral fashion to the center. I like a sort of bumpy shape so that the petals end up a bit irregular If you aren’t so sure about your cutting skills, feel free to draw your spiral before cutting. STEP THREE: roll your blossom start at the outside edge and coil tightly And your flower grows.

Locksmiths Blog » 10 Beautifully Intricate Locks Many locks are undeniably beautiful to look at, whether it be their flamboyantly intricate inner workings or decorative, ornate outer plates. Maybe not so much with modern locks, where the focus on function is seen as far more important than the need for touches of elaborate stylistic flair, but certainly with locks of old. Thankfully for us, and highlighted by the collection assembled below, many of these old works of art have been kept in pristine condition and continue to stand guard the world over. Image Source Above: Designed by Franz von Stuck and found at Bremen City Hall, Germany. Image Source Above: The stunning inner-workings of a chest lock in Levoča, Slovakia. Image Source Above: A door lock built in the 16th Century in Romania. Image Source Above: Another beautiful lock found in the lid of a chest, this time in Croatia. Image Source Above: A lock and key from Rothenburg, Germany. Image Source Above: This grand, textured lock was spotted in Chennai, India. Image Source Above: Gorgeous.

Scientific skepticism Carl Sagan, originator of the expression scientific skepticism Scientific skepticism (also spelled scepticism) is the practice of questioning whether claims are supported by empirical research and have reproducibility, as part of a methodological norm pursuing "the extension of certified knowledge".[1] For example, Robert K. Merton asserts that all ideas must be tested and are subject to rigorous, structured community scrutiny (see Mertonian norms).[2] About the term and its scope[edit] Scientific skepticism is also called rational skepticism, and it is sometimes referred to as skeptical inquiry. Scientific skepticism is different from philosophical skepticism, which questions our ability to claim any knowledge about the nature of the world and how we perceive it. Various definitions[edit] Scientific skepticism has been defined as: "Skepticism is a provisional approach to claims. "Skepticism is a method of examining claims about the world. Overview[edit] History of scientific skepticism[edit]

New Page 1 A phobia is an unreasonable, uncontrollable fear of a given object or situation and can develop in a variety of ways, including conditioning. PHOBIAS & CLASSICAL CONDITIONING Phobias can be acquired through classical conditioning by pairing a neutral stimulus with something that really causes pain. Phobia responses can be permanent unless the organism is subjected to the extinction process. PHOBIAS & OPERANT CONDITIONING Phobias can be acquired through operant conditioning by reinforcement. This page is Bobby Approved TetraBox Light by Ed Chew Liquid to Light Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space. Designer: Ed Chew

Debunker A debunker is a person who attempts to expose or discredit claims believed to be false, exaggerated or pretentious.[1] The term is closely associated with skeptical investigation of controversial topics such as U.F.O.s, claimed paranormal phenomena, cryptids, conspiracy theories, alternative medicine, religion, or exploratory or fringe areas of scientific or pseudoscientific research. According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "debunk" is defined as: To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief).To reduce the inflated reputation of (someone), esp. by ridicule: "comedy takes delight in debunking heroes". If debunkers are not careful, their communications may backfire – increasing an audience's long-term belief in myths. Etymology[edit] The term debunk originated in a 1923 novel Bunk, by American novelist William Woodward (1874–1950), who used it to mean to "take the bunk out of things Backfire effects[edit] Notable debunkers[edit] Organizations[edit]

B. F. Skinner Dr. C. George Boeree Biography Burrhus Frederic Skinner was born March 20, 1904, in the small Pennsylvania town of Susquehanna. Burrhus was an active, out-going boy who loved the outdoors and building things, and actually enjoyed school. Burrhus received his BA in English from Hamilton College in upstate New York. He wanted to be a writer and did try, sending off poetry and short stories. Ultimately, he resigned himself to writing newspaper articles on labor problems, and lived for a while in Greenwich Village in New York City as a “bohemian.” Also in that year, he moved to Minneapolis to teach at the University of Minnesota. combination crib and playpen with glass sides and air conditioning, it looked too much like keeping a baby in an aquarium to catch on. In 1945, he became the chairman of the psychology department at Indiana University. August 18, 1990, B. Theory B. Imagine a rat in a cage. What if you don’t give the rat any more pellets? Schedules of reinforcement Shaping Walden II

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