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Riddle

Riddle

http://www.brainlesstales.com/2011-05-13/riddle

Related:  Inspiration stories, Mystery & Skeptics

A Brief History of the Skeptic In January 1981 a new phenomenon burst upon the publishing scene. It was manifested in a four page, tabloid format newspaper, titled the Skeptic and it contained articles headed “Skeptics Test Psychic Surgeon”, “Doris Stokes Wrong — Police” and “Alien Honeycomb Tested”, among others. This issue was followed in August 1981 by No 2, in a new 16 page A4 format, and in November by No 3, also of 16 pages. Thus, in its first year of publication, the Skeptic comprised only three issues. From January 1982, the Skeptic became a quarterly magazine and has remained so ever since, with the number of pages gradually increasing to over 60 pages. Issues 1:1 to 3:1 were edited by Mark Plummer, then President of Australian Skeptics, with word processing carried out by Secretary, James Gerrand.

Books.Blog - Skip Graduate School, Save $32,000, Do This Instead -... Three years ago, I invested $32,000 and the better part of two years at the University of Washington for a master's degree in International Studies. The verdict? It wasn't a complete waste of time and money. Once I accepted that 80% of the course requirements were designed to keep people busy, I enjoyed the other 20% of the work. If you're strictly interested in learning, however, you may want to get a better return-on-investment than I did. rolled paper flowers {tutorial} Welcome to flower week – five days of simple and delightful flower projects. I could probably do three weeks of flowers because there are so many different ways to create them, but I’ve limited it to five of my current favorites. Before we get started, let me make a few disclaimers: 1. I find inspiration for projects all over the place {online, in shops, in magazines}, then figure out how to re-create them on my own. Each of these projects are my adaptation of something I’ve seen elsewhere.

Scientific skepticism Carl Sagan, originator of the expression scientific skepticism Scientific skepticism (also spelled scepticism) is the practice of questioning whether claims are supported by empirical research and have reproducibility, as part of a methodological norm pursuing "the extension of certified knowledge".[1] For example, Robert K. Merton asserts that all ideas must be tested and are subject to rigorous, structured community scrutiny (see Mertonian norms).[2] About the term and its scope[edit] Scientific skepticism is also called rational skepticism, and it is sometimes referred to as skeptical inquiry. Lackadaisy Expressions Boy, I didn't know what I was getting myself into when I started this. I've had requests for some sort of expressions tutorial dating back a while now, so I figured, "Sure! I can explain expression drawing...and it'll be way better than all those tutorials out there that are nothing but charts of generic expressions. Yeah!

New Page 1 A phobia is an unreasonable, uncontrollable fear of a given object or situation and can develop in a variety of ways, including conditioning. PHOBIAS & CLASSICAL CONDITIONING Phobias can be acquired through classical conditioning by pairing a neutral stimulus with something that really causes pain. Phobia responses can be permanent unless the organism is subjected to the extinction process. In the extinction process, one must confront the fear without the presence of the unconditioned stimulus. Debunker A debunker is a person who attempts to expose or discredit claims believed to be false, exaggerated or pretentious.[1] The term is closely associated with skeptical investigation of controversial topics such as U.F.O.s, claimed paranormal phenomena, cryptids, conspiracy theories, alternative medicine, religion, or exploratory or fringe areas of scientific or pseudoscientific research. According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "debunk" is defined as: To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief).To reduce the inflated reputation of (someone), esp. by ridicule: "comedy takes delight in debunking heroes". If debunkers are not careful, their communications may backfire – increasing an audience's long-term belief in myths. Backfire effects can occur if a message spends too much time on the negative case, if it is too complex, or if the message is threatening.[2]

B. F. Skinner Dr. C. George Boeree Biography Burrhus Frederic Skinner was born March 20, 1904, in the small Pennsylvania town of Susquehanna. His father was a lawyer, and his mother a strong and intelligent housewife.

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