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Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there. Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Early career[edit] Lyceum Theatre[edit] Related:  Fun Readings

Dracula My gosh, it's full of sex! by Mysticmidget, January 10, 2013 I agree with "somethingisbrokehere". I read through this summary to aid in an essay about this book and was positively shocked...though it gave me plenty of giggles! Dracula has many things about it which make it partly comedy to me, though of course it's only due to the change of the times. Sorry about earlier but let me explain Douglas Adams Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. Adams also wrote Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (1987) and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988), and co-wrote The Meaning of Liff (1983), The Deeper Meaning of Liff (1990), Last Chance to See (1990), and three stories for the television series Doctor Who. A posthumous collection of his work, including an unfinished novel, was published as The Salmon of Doubt in 2002. Adams became known as an advocate for environmentalism and conservation, and also as a lover of fast cars, cameras, technological innovation, and the Apple Macintosh. Early life[edit] Adams was born on 11 March 1952 to Janet (née Donovan) and Christopher Douglas Adams in Cambridge, England.[4] The following year Watson and Crick famously first modelled DNA at Cambridge University, leading Adams to later quip he was DNA in Cambridge months earlier. Education[edit] Career[edit] Writing[edit]

Grimm's Fairy Tales This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. (Some of the translations are slightly different, the arrangement also differs, and the Grimm's scholarly notes are not included.) The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker.

Bernard Cornwell Biography[edit] Cornwell was born in London in 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. He was adopted and brought up in Thundersley, Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict sect who were pacifists, banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. After he left them, he changed his name to his mother's maiden name, Cornwell. Cornwell was sent to Monkton Combe School. Career[edit] As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C. Cornwell and wife Judy co-wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym "Susannah Kells". In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen's 80th Birthday Honours List.[7] Novel series[edit] The Sharpe stories[edit] Cornwell's best known books feature the adventures of Richard Sharpe, an English soldier during the Napoleonic Wars. The Warlord Chronicles[edit] The Grail Quest novels[edit] The Saxon Stories[edit]

Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time » Life-Changing Arts A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the left of it. Voting is possible once per day. Votes PoemAuthor IfRudyard Kipling EchoChristina Georgina Rossetti If you think the best poem of all times is not even on this list, by all means, let us know which poem it is and why you think it should be added. Get inspired.. inspire others.. Back to Greatest Books of All Time

The Saxon Stories The following novels are now available: Style[edit] The series is frequently compared to The Warlord Chronicles, not only because of similarities between the two protagonists (both were orphaned), but also in the similarities between the foreign menace in the form of the Danes in The Saxon Stories and the Saxons in The Warlord Chronicles. The main character, Uhtred of Bebbanburg (the old Saxon name of Bamburgh Castle), is an old man telling tales of events that took place decades earlier, starting from his childhood and going on, his story intertwining with the story of the British Isles in the end of the ninth century. Bernard Cornwell mentioned in the historical notes at the end of The Lords of the North that he intended to continue writing The Saxon Stories. References[edit] See also[edit] Anglo-Saxon warfare

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach. Most of us really try to teach the kids to think, rather than becoming nice little automatons.

Hermann Hesse Biography[edit] Family background[edit] Hermann Hesse was born on 2 July 1877 in the Black Forest town of Calw in Württemberg, German Empire. His parents served in India at a mission under the auspices of the Basel Mission, a Protestant Christian missionary society. Hesse's birthplace, 2007 Hesse's father, Johannes Hesse, the son of a doctor, was born in 1847 in the Estonian town of Paide (Weissenstein). Hesse grew up in a Swabian Pietist household, with the Pietist tendency to insulate believers into small, deeply thoughtful groups. Childhood[edit] From childhood, Hesse appeared headstrong and hard for his family to handle. St. Hermann Hesse's grandfather Hermann Gundert, a doctor of philosophy and fluent in multiple languages, encouraged the boy to read widely, giving him access to his library, which was filled with the works of world literature. Young Hesse shared a love of music with his mother. Education[edit] Becoming a writer[edit] Between Lake Constance and India[edit]

Patrick Rothfuss - Official Website Read more reviews THE POWERFUL DEBUT NOVEL FROM FANTASY'S NEXT SUPERSTAR Told in Kvothe's own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen.The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature. A high-action story written with a poet's hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

The Warlord Chronicles The Warlord Chronicles is a trilogy of books about Arthurian Britain written by Bernard Cornwell. The story is written as a mixture of historical fiction and Arthurian mythology. The books have been published by Penguin and Michael Joseph in the United Kingdom and by St Martin's Press in the United States, in hardcover and paperback editions, each with different ISBNs. Books in the trilogy[edit] Treatment of legend and history[edit] Once upon a time, in a land that was called Britain, these things happened ... well, maybe. Like other "historical" takes on the Arthurian legends, the series postulates that Post-Roman Britain was a difficult time for the native Britons, being threatened by invasion from the Anglo-Saxons in the East and raids from the Irish in the West. The story is written as if it took place in Dark Age Britain as described in the original Welsh legends, with appropriate types of technology, culture, warfare, and attitudes. [edit] Other editions[edit] References[edit]

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