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Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there. Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Early career[edit] Lyceum Theatre[edit] Related:  Fun Readings

Dracula My gosh, it's full of sex! by Mysticmidget, January 10, 2013 I agree with "somethingisbrokehere". I read through this summary to aid in an essay about this book and was positively shocked...though it gave me plenty of giggles! Dracula has many things about it which make it partly comedy to me, though of course it's only due to the change of the times. Sorry about earlier but let me explain M. R. James Early influences[edit] Scholarly works[edit] James is best known for his ghost stories, but his work as a medieval scholar was prodigious and remains highly respected in scholarly circles. Indeed, the success of his stories was founded on his antiquarian talents and knowledge. He catalogued many of the manuscript libraries of the Cambridge colleges. James also achieved a great deal during his directorship of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge [1893–1908]. James was Provost of Eton College from 1918 to 1936.[1] He died in 1936 and was buried in Eton town cemetery. Ghost stories[edit] James's ghost stories were published in a series of collections: Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904), More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1911), A Thin Ghost and Others (1919), and A Warning to the Curious and Other Ghost Stories (1925). According to James, the story must "put the reader into the position of saying to himself, 'If I'm not very careful, something of this kind may happen to me!'" Film[edit]

Douglas Adams Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. Adams also wrote Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (1987) and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988), and co-wrote The Meaning of Liff (1983), The Deeper Meaning of Liff (1990), Last Chance to See (1990), and three stories for the television series Doctor Who. A posthumous collection of his work, including an unfinished novel, was published as The Salmon of Doubt in 2002. Adams became known as an advocate for environmentalism and conservation, and also as a lover of fast cars, cameras, technological innovation, and the Apple Macintosh. Early life[edit] Adams was born on 11 March 1952 to Janet (née Donovan) and Christopher Douglas Adams in Cambridge, England.[4] The following year Watson and Crick famously first modelled DNA at Cambridge University, leading Adams to later quip he was DNA in Cambridge months earlier. Education[edit] Career[edit] Writing[edit]

Henry Irving Sir Henry Irving (6 February 1838 – 13 October 1905), born John Henry Brodribb, sometimes known as J.H Irving was an English stage actor in the Victorian era, known as an actor-manager because he took complete responsibility (supervision of sets, lighting, direction, casting, as well as playing the leading roles) for season after season at the Lyceum Theatre, establishing himself and his company as representative of English classical theatre. He was the first actor to be awarded a knighthood. Irving is thought to have been the inspiration for the title character in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula.[1] Life and career[edit] He married Florence O'Callaghan on 15 July 1869 at St. Whether Irving's long, spectacularly successful relationship with leading lady Ellen Terry was romantic as well as professional has been the subject of much historical speculation. Early career[edit] his delineations of the various characters (...) were admirably graphic, and met with repeated rounds of applause.

Grimm's Fairy Tales This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. (Some of the translations are slightly different, the arrangement also differs, and the Grimm's scholarly notes are not included.) The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker.

The Body Snatcher The Body Snatcher (1884) is a short story by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson. First published in the Pall Mall Christmas "Extra", in December 1884, the story is based on characters in the employ of Robert Knox, around the time of the Burke and Hare murders. Plot summary[edit] The story begins with a group of friends sharing a few drinks, when an eminent doctor, Wolfe MacFarlane, enters. One of the friends, Fettes, recognizes the name and angrily confronts the new arrival. Although his friends all find this behaviour suspicious, none of them can understand what might lie behind it . It transpires that MacFarlane and Fettes had attended medical school together, under the famous professor of anatomy, Robert Knox. On one occasion, Fettes identifies a body as that of a woman he knew, and is convinced she has been murdered. Later, Fettes meets MacFarlane at a tavern, along with a man named Gray, who treats MacFarlane in a rude manner. Film, TV and theatrical adaptations[edit]

Bernard Cornwell Biography[edit] Cornwell was born in London in 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. He was adopted and brought up in Thundersley, Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict sect who were pacifists, banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. After he left them, he changed his name to his mother's maiden name, Cornwell. Cornwell was sent to Monkton Combe School. Career[edit] As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C. Cornwell and wife Judy co-wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym "Susannah Kells". In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen's 80th Birthday Honours List.[7] Novel series[edit] The Sharpe stories[edit] Cornwell's best known books feature the adventures of Richard Sharpe, an English soldier during the Napoleonic Wars. The Warlord Chronicles[edit] The Grail Quest novels[edit] The Saxon Stories[edit]

Gone with the Wind (film) The production of the film was troubled from the start. Filming was delayed for two years due to David O. Selznick's determination to secure Clark Gable for the role of Rhett Butler, and the "search for Scarlett" led to 1,400 women being interviewed for the part. The original screenplay was written by Sidney Howard, but underwent many revisions by several writers in an attempt to get it down to a suitable length. Part 1 At the Twelve Oaks party, Scarlett notices that she is being admired by Rhett Butler, who has been disowned by his family. Scarlett is quickly widowed when Charles dies from a bout of pneumonia and measles while serving in the Confederate Army. The tide of war turns against the Confederacy after the Battle of Gettysburg in which many of the men of Scarlett's town are killed. Eight months later, as the city is besieged by the Union Army in the Atlanta Campaign, Melanie goes into premature and difficult labor. Part 2 Clark Gable Vivien Leigh Leslie Howard Olivia de Havilland

Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time » Life-Changing Arts A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the left of it. Voting is possible once per day. Votes PoemAuthor IfRudyard Kipling EchoChristina Georgina Rossetti If you think the best poem of all times is not even on this list, by all means, let us know which poem it is and why you think it should be added. Get inspired.. inspire others.. Back to Greatest Books of All Time

Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is the original title of a novella written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson that was first published in 1886. The work is commonly known today as The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Dr. The work is commonly associated with the rare mental condition often spuriously called "split personality", referred to in psychiatry as dissociative identity disorder, where within the same body there exists more than one distinct personality.[4] In this case, there are two personalities within Dr Jekyll, one apparently good and the other evil; completely opposite levels of morality. Inspiration and writing[edit] Robert Louis Stevenson "In the small hours of one morning,[...]I was awakened by cries of horror from Louis. Lloyd Osbourne, Stevenson's stepson, wrote: "I don't believe that there was ever such a literary feat before as the writing of Dr Jekyll. Stevenson re-wrote the story in three to six days. Plot[edit] A year passes uneventfully.

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