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Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned. Early life[edit] Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799–1876), from Dublin, and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818–1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there. Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Early career[edit] Lyceum Theatre[edit] Related:  Fun Readings

Dracula My gosh, it's full of sex! by Mysticmidget, January 10, 2013 I agree with "somethingisbrokehere". I read through this summary to aid in an essay about this book and was positively shocked...though it gave me plenty of giggles! Dracula has many things about it which make it partly comedy to me, though of course it's only due to the change of the times. Sorry about earlier but let me explain Grimm's Fairy Tales This book contains 209 tales collected by the brothers Grimm. The exact print source is unknown. The etext appears to be based on the translation by Margaret Hunt called Grimm's Household Tales, but it is not identical to her edition. (Some of the translations are slightly different, the arrangement also differs, and the Grimm's scholarly notes are not included.) The etext received by the Universal Library did not include story titles. Note that these tales are presented more or less as the Grimms collected and edited them (and as Hunt saw fit to translate them). NEW: There is now a more accurate version of the Hunt translation posted by William Barker.

Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time » Life-Changing Arts A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the left of it. Voting is possible once per day. Votes PoemAuthor IfRudyard Kipling EchoChristina Georgina Rossetti If you think the best poem of all times is not even on this list, by all means, let us know which poem it is and why you think it should be added. Get inspired.. inspire others.. Back to Greatest Books of All Time

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake. @djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach. Most of us really try to teach the kids to think, rather than becoming nice little automatons.

Patrick Rothfuss - Official Website Read more reviews THE POWERFUL DEBUT NOVEL FROM FANTASY'S NEXT SUPERSTAR Told in Kvothe's own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen.The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature. A high-action story written with a poet's hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

SI.com - Inside Game Gang - Rick Reilly Archive - - RICK REILLY, 45, is in his 19th year as a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. He has been voted National Sportswriter of the Year eight times. He is the author of the weekly "Life of Reilly" column that runs on the last page of SI. Publishers Weekly called him "an indescribable amalgam of Dave Barry, Jim Murray and Lewis Grizzard, with the timing of Jay Leno and the wit of Johnny Carson." His current book Who's Your Caddy? His first novel, Missing Links, (Doubleday) a comic golf romance, was hailed by the New York Times as "three laughs per page." Reilly has won numerous awards in his 23-year writing career, including the prestigious New York Newspaper Guild's Page One Award for Best Magazine Story. He has written about everything from ice skater Katarina Witt behind the Iron Curtain to actor Jack Nicholson in the front row, from wrestling priests in Mexico City to women caddies in Japan, from playing golf with President Clinton to playing golf with O.J.

Dresden Files | Jim Butcher You can also find Harry in original and adapted graphic novels. See our store for more The Dresden Files complete TV series is also available Finally, you can check out the multi-award-winning Dresden Files Role-Playing Game at www.dresdenfilesrpg.com About the Series The Dresden Files are Jim’s first published series, telling the story of Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden, Chicago’s first (and only) Wizard P.I. Jim has commented in the past that he’s got ideas for running the series into the lower twenties, at least — here’s hoping the publisher agrees! The Science Fiction Book Club has gathered many of the Dresden books into hardcover omnibuses: Storm Front, Fool Moon, and Grave Peril are collected in Wizard for Hire; Summer Knight and Death Masks are in Wizard By Trade; Blood Rites and Dead Beat are in Wizard at Large; and Proven Guilty and White Night make up Wizard Under Fire. Extras Ever wonder how Harry did as a private eye before he set out on his own? Quotes — Locus — BookBrowser

30 Books You Should Read Before You're 30 The best books aren't static stories, but living entities with meanings that change and grow along with you. That's why we strongly recommend rereading the classics that were assigned to you in high school; you may find that they're nothing like they were before. Still, some books are best experienced at a certain age, like, say, "Catcher in the Rye." If you pick it up for the first time when you're far beyond puberty, you'll likely wonder what all the hype is about. There are also fantastic classics that may not have been assigned to you in school but that you should pick up ASAP simply because you're missing out -- books like Doris Lessing's "The Golden Notebook" or "A Collection of Essays" by George Orwell. Check out the 30 books we think you should read before you're 30: "The Dream of a Common Language," by Adrienne Rich Pivotal to the feminist movement, Rich's poetry collection is one of three books Cheryl Strayed brought with her on the trek she chronicles in her book, "Wild."

I Ching The I Ching, also known as the Classic of Changes, Book of Changes, Zhouyi and Yijing, is one of the oldest of the Chinese classic texts.[1] The book contains a divination system comparable to Western geomancy or the West African Ifá system; in Western cultures and modern East Asia, it is still widely used for this purpose. Traditionally, the I Ching and its hexagrams were thought to pre-date recorded history,[2] and based on traditional Chinese accounts, its origins trace back to the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE.[3] Modern scholarship suggests that the earliest layers of the text may date from the end of the 2nd millennium BCE, but place doubts on the mythological aspects in the traditional accounts.[4] Some consider the I Ching the oldest extant book of divination, dating from 1,000 BCE and before.[5] The oldest manuscript that has been found, albeit incomplete, dates back to the Warring States period (475–221 BCE).[6] History[edit] Traditional view[edit] Modernist view[edit] Structure[edit]

Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology <editorial date="2007"> This document is readable by you today, almost 14 years after I wrote it and more than 12 years after I put it on the web, because of open formats. In this specific case, the format is HTML 2. Can we say the same thing about word processing documents, spread sheets and other office documents? No, at least not yet. An open format for office documents, based on XML, has been worked out by a consortium of companies, universities and agencies. The consortium includes a very wide range of interests who rely on electronic documents, they include Boeing, IBM, The Society of Biblical Literature, and Ann Arbor's own Arbortext to name a few. The new office document format is called OpenDocument, and can be used by anyone, anywhere, free of charge and for as long as they want. A paper for Religion 375 at the University of Michigan by Lars Noodén, 22 November 1992 Specific animals have specific associations depending on the characteristics of the type of animal.

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