background preloader

The book of Chaos, Discord and Confusion

The book of Chaos, Discord and Confusion
Welcome to the Principia Discordia This website is dedicated to bringing the Principia Discordia to the masses, in its original, chock-full-o-pictures form! What's the Principia, you ask? Well, it's the Magnum Opiate of Malaclypse the Younger, Wherein Is Explained Absolutely Everything Worth Knowing About Absolutely Anything. Duh! If you're interested in meeting and talking with other Discordians, we have some very active forums or you can check into the IRC channel.

http://www.principiadiscordia.com/

Related:  Inspiration stories, Mystery & SkepticsReading OnlineDisinformation

Taman Shud Case Following a public appeal by police, the copy of the Rubaiyat from which the page had been torn was located. On the inside back cover of the book, detectives were able to read – in indentions from handwriting – a local telephone number, another unidentified number and a text that resembled an encrypted message. The text has not been deciphered or interpreted in a way that satisfies authorities on the case. The case has been considered, since the early stages of the police investigation, "one of Australia's most profound mysteries".[1] There has been intense speculation ever since regarding the identity of the victim, the cause of his death and the events leading up to it.

Meat I’m honored that this often shows up on the internet. Here’s the correct version, as published in Omni, 1990. "They're made out of meat." "Meat?" "Meat. Areas Of Interest A few days ago, I exchanged emails with a journalist friend. She said the following, "I'm just wondering which sectors/investment areas/types of start-ups you think will be exciting investments in 2010, and which you're staying away from because they're over-hyped, not yet ready, etc." Today I sent a friend in the VC business an email outlining some areas I wanted to focus on this year so we could find some things to work on together.

Kübler-Ross model The model was first introduced by Swiss-American Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying, and was inspired by her work with terminally ill patients.[1] Motivated by the lack of curriculum in medical schools on the subject of death and dying, Kübler-Ross began a project which examined death and those faced with it while working as an instructor at the University of Chicago's medical school. Kübler-Ross' project evolved into a series of seminars which, along with patient interviews and previous research became the foundation for her book, and revolutionized how the U.S. medical field takes care of the terminally ill. In the decades since the publication of "On Death and Dying", the Kübler-Ross concept has become largely accepted by the general public; however, its validity has yet to be consistently supported by the majority of research studies that have examined it[citation needed]. Stages[edit]

Douglas Hofstadter Douglas Richard Hofstadter (born February 15, 1945) is an American professor of cognitive science whose research focuses on the sense of "I",[2][3] consciousness, analogy-making, artistic creation, literary translation, and discovery in mathematics and physics. He is best known for his book Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, first published in 1979. It won both the Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction[4][5] and a National Book Award (at that time called The American Book Award) for Science.[6][a] His 2007 book I Am a Strange Loop won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science and Technology.[7][8][9] Early life and education[edit]

The Last Question The Last Question by Isaac Asimov — © 1956 The last question was asked for the first time, half in jest, on May 21, 2061, at a time when humanity first stepped into the light. The question came about as a result of a five dollar bet over highballs, and it happened this way: Alexander Adell and Bertram Lupov were two of the faithful attendants of Multivac. Why Apple Was My Company of The Decade – GigaOM Back on the cusp of the new century, I was one of the ThinkPad people, rarely encountering Mac machines unless you counted those used by Forbes.com’s design staff. In August 2000, when I joined Red Herring (the Jason Pontin edition), I got a Pismo Powerbook running the Mac OS 9. As a technology journalist chronicling the world of Internet and broadband, I could see that our world was going to change. All media was going to go digital and would be distributed over this new broadband network. It was a matter of when and how. In January 2001, when Steve Jobs spoke about his digital hub strategy, a lightbulb went off in my head.

tPOD1 - thermoelectric Power On Demand by Richard Harmon Introducing the tPOD1 to the world… …off-grid or denied-grid thermoelectric Power On Demand. …eco-friendly, multi-functional, portable, dependable, and durable. …born and made in Traverse City, Michigan USA. "Count me in as a 'late sparrow'. As a teacher, I can see Third World applications for the tPOD1. The Tao Of Programming Translated by Geoffrey James Transcribed by Duke Hillard Transmitted by Anupam Trivedi, Sajitha Tampi, and Meghshyam Jagannath Re-html-ized and edited by Kragen Sittler Last modified 1996-04-10 or earlier Nanotech Could Make Humans Immortal By 2040, Futurist Says - CIO Computerworld — In 30 or 40 years, we'll have microscopic machines traveling through our bodies, repairing damaged cells and organs, effectively wiping out diseases. The nanotechnology will also be used to back up our memories and personalities. In an interview with Computerworld , author and futurist Ray Kurzweil said that anyone alive come 2040 or 2050 could be close to immortal. The quickening advance of nanotechnology means that the human condition will shift into more of a collaboration of man and machine , as nanobots flow through human blood streams and eventually even replace biological blood, he added.

Related:  DiscordianismRobert Shea