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Anomalies-Unlimited Ghosts

Anomalies-Unlimited Ghosts
I've always got a kick how people will fall reverently silent and consider you blessed if you say you saw an angel or some "vision", but if you tell those same people you saw a ghost they'd tell you how full of it you were. Is there a difference? I sat in the library for 9 solid hours one day (heaven!), looking at every ghost book they had; "psychic photography", famous hauntings, the haunted; the stupid-ass "ectoplasm" photos of long-ago Mediums, badly faked portraits of spirit photography, the psychology and physiology behind those who claim demonic possession, EVP, infrared ghost photos, Near Death experiences. I reread all the yellowed books of a "famous" ghost hunter and remembered even as a kid realizing what a liar he was. I smiled at the photos of cigarette smoke, water drops, exhaled breath, film glitches, light leaks, developing drips and camera straps that passed as "plasma vortexes" and "spirit globes". Maybe not. But - I know better. Any good ghost stuff, Emaill me.

http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Ghosts.html

Related:  Stuff n Junk

La communauté de l’immortalité à Gavdos Sur une petite île rocheuse du sud de l’Europe, depuis une cabane en bois, un scientifique russe et barbu nous parle d’une mystérieuse congrégation religieuse. « Il n’y aura pas de nouvelles générations », nous dit-il, « nous sommes la dernière. Nous n’allons pas autoriser la naissance d’individus mortels. Ils ne sont pas nécessaires ». Avec sa clope roulée et son coupe-vent en loques, ce type a vraiment l’air d’un clodo. Mais il est, en réalité, un membre éminent de ce qu’il convient d’appeler une « communauté d’immortalité » formée sur l’île de Gavdos par sept scientifiques russes qui se sont établis là il y a plus de 15 ans.

Top 10 Best Ghost Photographs While trying to decide which ghost photos are the “best” is largely an exercise in subjectivity, it’s difficult to know which ones are the best with any degree of objectivity. These are the photos I consider the most authentic “captures” of ghosts ever caught on film, but I leave it to you to decide for yourself how real they may be. Of course, I realize that almost any photo can be hoaxed, but many of these were taken many years or even decades before digital cameras and the advent of Photoshop and other photo manipulation software came on the scene, making them somewhat more difficult to fake than it would be today. 10. The Queensland Photo, 1946 Taken in 1946 in Queensland, Australia by a mother who was taking a picture of her teenage daughter’s grave. Demons A to Z - Weird Encyclopedia A list of demons, devils, and evil gods from around the world. Probably not exhaustive. If you know of any more, keep it to yourself. Abaddon - King of the Demons of Hell. Also known as Apollyon (Greek). Abigor - Rides a horse and carries a scepter and lance.

Joshua Norton Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour les articles homonymes, voir Norton. Joshua Norton Joshua Abraham Norton (vers 1819 - ) était un habitant de San Francisco, qui s’était autoproclamé « empereur des États-Unis » en 1859 sous le nom de Norton Ier, puis également « protecteur de Mexique ». Même s'il n'a jamais exercé de réel pouvoir politique, il devint un personnage célèbre de San Francisco, honoré après sa mort et source d'inspiration pour les écrivains Robert Louis Stevenson et Mark Twain.

the Strange & Unexplained 25 Things You Should Know About Character Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… A Brief History of the Skeptic In January 1981 a new phenomenon burst upon the publishing scene. It was manifested in a four page, tabloid format newspaper, titled the Skeptic and it contained articles headed “Skeptics Test Psychic Surgeon”, “Doris Stokes Wrong — Police” and “Alien Honeycomb Tested”, among others. This issue was followed in August 1981 by No 2, in a new 16 page A4 format, and in November by No 3, also of 16 pages. Thus, in its first year of publication, the Skeptic comprised only three issues.

Scientific skepticism Carl Sagan, originator of the expression scientific skepticism Scientific skepticism (also spelled scepticism) is the practice of questioning whether claims are supported by empirical research and have reproducibility, as part of a methodological norm pursuing "the extension of certified knowledge".[1] For example, Robert K. Merton asserts that all ideas must be tested and are subject to rigorous, structured community scrutiny (see Mertonian norms).[2]

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