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Caïds des cités : le nouveau grand banditisme

Caïds des cités : le nouveau grand banditisme

Related:  Inspiration stories, Mystery & Skeptics

Weird sea creatures discovered in Antarctic A new species of yeti crab piles around the hydrothermal vents in Antarctica. NERC ChEsSo Consortium Scientists doing their first exploring of deep-sea vents in the Antarctic have uncovered a world unlike anything found around other hydrothermal vents, one populated by new species of anemones, predatory sea stars, and piles of hairy-chested yeti crabs. It was "almost like a sight from another planet," said expedition leader Alex Rogers, a professor of zoology at Oxford University. Even in the eye-popping world of deep-sea vents, the Antarctic discoveries stand out, with the unfamiliar species of crabs found crowded in piles around the warm waters emanating from the seafloor.

Outrage au drapeau : à droite, la nation est une punition Une photo montrant un homme s’essuyant les fesses avec le drapeau français. Une photo qui vaut surtout par les réactions « outragées » de certains milieux politiques. A l’UMP et au gouvernement, comme le réclame Alliot-Marie, on prépare sûrement une nouvelle loi, à voter de toute urgence, sanctionnant ce crime inqualifiable.

Top 30 des photos les plus cools de Jacques Chirac, un président comme on n’en fait plus Vous en aviez déjà marre des photos de François Hollande et Nicolas Sarkozy, alors plutôt que d'épuiser les ressources inépuisables de la Présidentielle, pourquoi ne pas faire un petit saut dans le passé ? Le tumblr Fuck Yeah Jacques Chirac sélectionne des photos très classes de notre ancien président. Et un blog sur Chirac qui a comme slogan "smooth pimping, suave gangsterism", on ne pouvait vraiment pas passer à côté. (MAJ Novembre 2013) °

1000 Interesting Facts Butterflies cannot fly if their body temperature is less than 86 degrees. Neurons multiply at a rate 250,000 neurons per minute during early pregnancy. Elephants have the longest pregnancy in the animal kingdom at 22 months. The longest human pregnancy on record is 17 months, 11 days. A female oyster produces 100 million young in her lifetime, the typical hen lays 19 dozen eggs a year, and it is possible for one female cat to be responsible for the birth of 20,736 kittens in four years. Michelle Druggar holds the record for largest human family, having given birth to 17 children. 21 Hidden Secrets of the Illuminati « 100 Musical Footsteps to celebrate Angels and Demons (dan brown’s latest film), I play a little devil’s advocate here. After all, the Illuminati CONTROL EVERYTHING, don’t they? 1. they control the media. yep, cnn, bbc, fox news, printed pages.

Air Force UFO Rules Vanish After Huffington Post Inquiry The military deleted a passage about unidentified flying objects from a 2008 Air Force personnel manual just days after The Huffington Post asked Pentagon officials about the purpose of the UFO section. Before the recent revisions, the document -- Air Force Instruction 10-206 -- advised pilots, radar operators and other Air Force personnel on what to do when they encountered any unknown airborne objects. Now in the 2011 version, the reference to UFOs -- which simply means "unidentified flying objects," not necessarily spaceships with little green men -- has been eliminated. What makes this so intriguing is that the U.S. government officially stopped investigating UFOs in 1969 with the termination of the Air Force's Project Blue Book. Air Force AFI 2008Credit: John Greenewald, Jr. --

Unexplained Phenomenon The FBI’s Reading Room contains many files of public interest and historical value. In compliance with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requirements, some of these records are no longer in the physical possession of the FBI, eliminating the FBI’s capability to re-review and/or re-process this material. Please note, that the information found in these files may no longer reflect the current beliefs, positions, opinions, or policies currently held by the FBI.

Skepticism Skepticism or scepticism (see American and British English spelling differences) is generally any questioning attitude towards knowledge, facts, or opinions/beliefs stated as facts,[1] or doubt regarding claims that are taken for granted elsewhere.[2] Philosophical skepticism is an overall approach that requires all information to be well supported by evidence.[3] Classical philosophical skepticism derives from the 'Skeptikoi', a school who "asserted nothing".[4] Adherents of Pyrrhonism, for instance, suspend judgment in investigations.[5] Skeptics may even doubt the reliability of their own senses.[6] Religious skepticism, on the other hand, is "doubt concerning basic religious principles (such as immortality, providence, and revelation)".[7] Definition[edit]

Critical thinking Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking. According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. Debunker A debunker is a person who attempts to expose or discredit claims believed to be false, exaggerated or pretentious.[1] The term is closely associated with skeptical investigation of controversial topics such as U.F.O.s, claimed paranormal phenomena, cryptids, conspiracy theories, alternative medicine, religion, or exploratory or fringe areas of scientific or pseudoscientific research. According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "debunk" is defined as: To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief).To reduce the inflated reputation of (someone), esp. by ridicule: "comedy takes delight in debunking heroes". If debunkers are not careful, their communications may backfire – increasing an audience's long-term belief in myths. Backfire effects can occur if a message spends too much time on the negative case, if it is too complex, or if the message is threatening.[2]

Scientific skepticism Carl Sagan, originator of the expression scientific skepticism Scientific skepticism (also spelled scepticism) is the practice of questioning whether claims are supported by empirical research and have reproducibility, as part of a methodological norm pursuing "the extension of certified knowledge".[1] For example, Robert K. Merton asserts that all ideas must be tested and are subject to rigorous, structured community scrutiny (see Mertonian norms).[2] About the term and its scope[edit] Scientific skepticism is also called rational skepticism, and it is sometimes referred to as skeptical inquiry. A Brief History of the Skeptic In January 1981 a new phenomenon burst upon the publishing scene. It was manifested in a four page, tabloid format newspaper, titled the Skeptic and it contained articles headed “Skeptics Test Psychic Surgeon”, “Doris Stokes Wrong — Police” and “Alien Honeycomb Tested”, among others. This issue was followed in August 1981 by No 2, in a new 16 page A4 format, and in November by No 3, also of 16 pages. Thus, in its first year of publication, the Skeptic comprised only three issues. From January 1982, the Skeptic became a quarterly magazine and has remained so ever since, with the number of pages gradually increasing to over 60 pages. Issues 1:1 to 3:1 were edited by Mark Plummer, then President of Australian Skeptics, with word processing carried out by Secretary, James Gerrand.