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Lost Generation

Lost Generation

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91-year-old man knits hats for the homeless Share Video GRANDVILLE, MICH. - When you reach the end of your life, what will go through your mind? Which areas of your life will you scrutinize and take inventory? Will you evaluate whether or not you were a good son, sibling, father and friend? Maybe you’ll think about the accomplishments you accumulated or, perhaps, some of the failures and shortcomings. 30 Books You Should Read Before You're 30 The best books aren't static stories, but living entities with meanings that change and grow along with you. That's why we strongly recommend rereading the classics that were assigned to you in high school; you may find that they're nothing like they were before. Still, some books are best experienced at a certain age, like, say, "Catcher in the Rye." If you pick it up for the first time when you're far beyond puberty, you'll likely wonder what all the hype is about. Likewise, there are certain books you should read in your 20s, due to the age of the characters or the intended audience -- books like Donna Tartt's "The Secret History" or Christopher Hitchens' "Letters to a Young Contrarian." There are also fantastic classics that may not have been assigned to you in school but that you should pick up ASAP simply because you're missing out -- books like Doris Lessing's "The Golden Notebook" or "A Collection of Essays" by George Orwell.

Kombucha (The Wonder Tea You Should Be Drinking) We’re a little bit obsessed with drinking Kombucha in Food Matters HQ. You might have seen recently we suggested you have this fermented tea beverage daily to reap the myriad of health benefits associated with it. We’re just love it! We even created some delicious mocktails! Basically, it is a sweetened tea that is fermented using a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast), this is also know as ‘mother’ due to its ability to reproduce (not creepy). This is used as the starter culture to produce the friendly bacteria to heal your gut and also your whole body. 15 perfectly timed photos that will make you look twice Sometimes the most unusual photos can happen absolutely randomly. Nonetheless, you need to have a creative vision as well as an ability to see new perspectives. Bright Side introduces a compilation of photos in which a moment defines everything. A dog trap Metamorphosis

I Ching The I Ching, also known as the Classic of Changes, Book of Changes, Zhouyi and Yijing, is one of the oldest of the Chinese classic texts.[1] The book contains a divination system comparable to Western geomancy or the West African Ifá system; in Western cultures and modern East Asia, it is still widely used for this purpose. Traditionally, the I Ching and its hexagrams were thought to pre-date recorded history,[2] and based on traditional Chinese accounts, its origins trace back to the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE.[3] Modern scholarship suggests that the earliest layers of the text may date from the end of the 2nd millennium BCE, but place doubts on the mythological aspects in the traditional accounts.[4] Some consider the I Ching the oldest extant book of divination, dating from 1,000 BCE and before.[5] The oldest manuscript that has been found, albeit incomplete, dates back to the Warring States period (475–221 BCE).[6] History[edit] Traditional view[edit] Modernist view[edit] Structure[edit]

A Simple Way to Pray Every Day Of all the things Martin Luther is known for, among the foremost is his dedication to prayer. He is famous for commenting, “I have so much to do that I shall spend the first three hours in prayer.” He wasn’t exaggerating, either. Many of his friends and students could attest that he would spend several hours on his knees in fervent, daily prayer — often at seemingly inopportune times in the middle of the day. At one point, Luther’s barber and longtime friend, Peter Beskendorf, asked if he would teach him how to pray. Luther responded by writing Beskendorf a letter which he called, “A Simple Way to Pray.”

How to make sherbet Follow this recipe to make sherbet at home, or as a part of a science experiment at school, and learn about the chemical reaction that makes it so fizzy when you put it in your mouth. You will need citric acid bicarbonate soda icing sugar flavoured jelly crystals teaspoon dessert spoon small mixing bowl small snap lock bag. What to do Add 1 level teaspoon of citric acid to the bowl.

Patrick Rothfuss - Official Website Read more reviews THE POWERFUL DEBUT NOVEL FROM FANTASY'S NEXT SUPERSTAR Told in Kvothe's own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen.The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature. A high-action story written with a poet's hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.