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Eric Trump: Dems aren't even people. How a ‘shadow’ universe of charities joined with political warriors to fuel Trump’s rise. These Republicans didn't like Trump at first. They do now. "Trump's a buffoon," David Searles said before casting a vote for Marco Rubio in the New Hampshire primary.

These Republicans didn't like Trump at first. They do now.

"He scares me," Rebecca Meyer said before settling on Ben Carson in South Carolina's primary. "He's not presidential," Gail Francioli said after backing Ohio Gov. John Kasich in that state's primary. Yet like nearly nine out of 10 Republicans nationwide, Searles, Meyer and Francioli supported Trump in the general election. And like the vast majority of Republicans, they support him still. In fact, these one-time-skeptics are part of the bulwark that is bolstering a President whose first month in office roiled the nation. Consider Wendy Housel of Summerville, South Carolina. Now? While reporting on the presidential campaign for CNN's book, "Unprecedented: The Election That Changed Everything," I interviewed voters in disparate regions of America. When it came time to vote, Republicans were as loyal to their party as Democrats were to theirs.

The reason is simple: They agree with him. Welcome to conservative Liberal, Mo. LIBERAL, Mo. • So bold were his convictions that George H.

Welcome to conservative Liberal, Mo.

Walser, a military veteran, former prosecutor and state legislator, bought a patch of southwestern Missouri prairie and slapped together a town to fit his radical ideology. He called it Liberal. No churches or saloons were allowed, just fellow freethinkers who didn’t want to be pestered in the 1880s by opposing views. The high-minded call, of course, sounded differently to devout Christians. But Walser was ready for them, having built a tall barbed-wire fence as a shield. “Word battles were wild and furious; and Liberal soon became known, not only as an infidel or atheist town, but as a very strange town,” author J.P. Few reminders are left today of the town’s origins, other than Darwin Street, some catalpa trees and a cemetery designed by Walser. “People are embarrassed,” said Mary Toney, 54, who runs a café.

And voting is guided by faith. “Your year may change but God is still the same,” reads one church sign. Gov. Loaded: 0% Equality of Opportunity. Text Young adults compared to their parents wages. Young adults compared to their parents wages. How Trump and the GOP will try to turn the entire country into Dixie. AP Photo/John Bazemore Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in Mississippi or Alabama?

How Trump and the GOP will try to turn the entire country into Dixie

Well if the GOP has its way, you’ll get the chance to find out. That’s because Donald Trump and congressional Republicans, through the executive branch leadership now being assembled and the legislative priorities they have laid out, are preparing to take the economic, political, and social arrangements of the South and spread them across the country. The desire to southernize the entire United States is not new, and in some ways it’s been happening for a while, at least where Republicans have control of government. But now that Republicans have complete control in Washington, they’re going to try to accelerate and deepen that process. The Southern economic model. This is a story with roots that go back before the Civil War, but in recent years it has taken on a new character as even foreign firms look to the American South as a source of cheap labor. The Southern health care model.

True. The Daily 202: Trump over performed the most in counties with the highest drug, alcohol and suicide mortality rates. Donald Trump takes the stage last night at Hy-Vee Hall in Des Moines for the third stop of his "thank you tour.

The Daily 202: Trump over performed the most in counties with the highest drug, alcohol and suicide mortality rates

" (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post) THE BIG IDEA: A new study from Penn State University suggests a relationship between the opioid epidemic and support for Donald Trump. The president-elect performed better than Mitt Romney in many places, but he fared best compared to the Republican nominee four years ago in the counties with the highest drug, alcohol and suicide mortality rates. Shannon M. Monnat, an assistant professor of rural sociology and demography, created a data set with numbers from 3,106 counties. Drug syringe and cooked heroin (Studio shot) -- Overdoses, alcoholism and suicide are known by experts collectively as “the diseases of despair.”

Want more stories like this? Get the must-read morning briefing for decision-makers. * Please enter valid email address Correlation is not causation, of course. Trump speaks last night. OxyContin pills at a pharmacy. Sen.