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Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?

Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?
Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages — and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health. pin This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

https://www.ted.com/talks/russell_foster_why_do_we_sleep

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