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Overcoming hopelessness - Nick Vujicic at TEDxNoviSad

Overcoming hopelessness - Nick Vujicic at TEDxNoviSad

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6P2nPI6CTlc

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How memories form and how we lose them - Catharine Young Memory: It isn’t just something, it's everything. And although scientists have pursued and puzzled over it for centuries, a definitive explanation of the actual memory process still eludes us--partly because our brain is so incredibly complex (it is made up of approximately 90 billion cells after all!). Let’s take a look at the basic neuroanatomy elements, which makes memory possible. Brain cells, called neurons are the core component of the nervous system and have the remarkable ability to communicate with each other and transfer information. They are able to accomplish through a process called synaptic transmission. Neurons release specialized proteins called neurotransmitters that travel through the space connecting each other together called synapses, and bind to specific proteins called receptors.

The Science of How Memory Works by Maria Popova What the four “slave” systems of the mind have to do with riding a bicycle. “Whatever becomes of [old memories], in the long intervals of consciousness?” Henry James wistfully pondered upon turning fifty. “They are like the lines of a letter written in sympathetic ink; hold the letter to the fire for a while and the grateful warmth brings out the invisible words.” James was not alone in seeking to understand the seemingly mysterious workings of human memory — something all the more urgently fascinating in our age of information overload, where we’re evolving a new kind of “transactive memory.”

A Social Enterprise dedicated to protecting and enhancing the Mental Health and Wellbeing of Young People and their Community Generation Next Blog ← Man Dies After Three-Day Internet Gaming Binge • Are Wellbeing Programmes Making Any Difference? → Charleston From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Charleston most commonly refers to: Charleston may also refer to: Geography[edit] In Australia: Robin Williams Didn't Kill Himself Robin Williams was 63. He was as successful as anyone could hope to be. It seems almost beyond reasoning to believe that he could have taken his own life. In fact, a friend of mine who suffers from a terminal illness, shared a thought on Facebook. She said that, sad as she felt for Williams, she couldn’t help but be angry with him. She had a terminal illness, she was fighting for life every day.

Who was Confucius? - Bryan W. Van Norden The philosopher Karl Jaspers said that Confucius, Jesus, Socrates, and the Buddha were similar in that each was an “axial figure” in one of the world’s great philosophical or religious traditions, yet we know almost no indisputable facts about any of them. Consequently, almost everything about the life of Confucius (as with Jesus, Socrates, or the Buddha) is controversial. Most of the quotations you hear attributed to Confucius are made up. Neuroscientists reveal how the brain can enhance connections When the brain forms memories or learns a new task, it encodes the new information by tuning connections between neurons. MIT neuroscientists have discovered a novel mechanism that contributes to the strengthening of these connections, also called synapses. At each synapse, a presynaptic neuron sends chemical signals to one or more postsynaptic receiving cells.

Search for "random acts of kindness" - Who Arted? Random Acts of Kindness Tree Did you know there is a Random Acts of Kindness Day? It’s celebrated every year on February 17th… But why limit yourself to one day a year? Saigon execution: Murder of a Vietcong by Saigon Police Chief, 1968 South Vietnamese Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of the national police, shoots Vietcong officer Nguyen Van Lem, also known as Bay Lop, on a Saigon street on Feb. 1, 1968. After Nguyen Ngoc Loan raised his sidearm and shot Vietcong operative Nguyen Van Lem in the head he walked over to the reporters and told them that, “These guys kill a lot of our people, and I think Buddha will forgive me.” Captured on NBC TV cameras and by AP photographer Eddie Adams, the picture and film footage flashed around the world and quickly became a symbol of the Vietnam War’s brutality. Eddie Adams’ picture was especially striking, as the moment frozen is one almost at the instant of death. Taken a split second after the trigger was pulled, Lem’s final expression is one of pain as the bullet rips through his head.

The Drive (and Despair) of The Rock: Dwayne Johnson on Battling Depression His five releases in 2013 together reaped $1.3 billion — more than any other star’s box office last year — making him, at least as far as his Hercules and San Andreas producer Beau Flynn is concerned, “the biggest star around.” Johnson has the ease and confidence to go with it. He projects a comfort level with success that makes you think things always have been this way and always will be. STORY: 'X-Men's' Ellen Page on Life After Coming Out, the Bryan Singer Case and Her Battle With Depression Which makes it all the more surprising to learn this is the same guy who endured massive upheaval as a child; got into frequent trouble with the law as a teenager; was kicked out of his home at 14; and faced the end of everything he had dreamed about when he was dumped as a professional football player, sending him into a crippling tailspin of despair. "I didn’t want to do a thing," he recalls.

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave - Alex Gendler Want to read the Allegory of the Cave in its complete format? Go to this site and get started. To better understand the allegory’s larger context, try reading the rest of The Republic by Plato and these classic lectures. Then, check out this modern scientific interpretation of what it tells us about human knowledge. Want to see two different visual representations of this allegory?

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