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Shimon Schocken: The self-organizing computer course

Shimon Schocken: The self-organizing computer course

http://www.ted.com/talks/shimon_schocken_the_self_organizing_computer_course.html

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10 talks on making schools great With just over a month to go before the 2012 presidential election in the US, eyes around the world are on the contest between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. The election may well come down to a few key issues. So what matters most to Americans? Ultimate Computer Hardware Videos" Computer Tour Have you ever wondered what is on the inside of your computer? Watch this video from HowStuffWorks as we take you on a tour of your computer. Episode 22: Understanding Drivers

Brilliant 10: Greg Nielson Shrinks Solar Cells To The Size Of Glitter Greg Nielson pushes a small jar full of rubbing alcohol across his desk at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico. In the jar float shiny solar cells the size of glitter. "If you have panels of these on top of Walmart, you get twice as much power [as conventional photovoltaics] and your costs go down by half," he says. For the past six years, Nielson has worked to dramatically reduce the size of solar cells in order to make them more durable, efficient, and cost-effective. When the Utah native arrived at Sandia in 2004, Nielson was one of the world's leading Greg NielsonAge 38Sandia National Laboratoriesresearchers of optical microelectro-mechanical systems—technology that uses light to drive tiny machines.

What a Non-Partisan Plan for U.S. Entrepeneurship Would Look Like - Derek Thompson The Republican National Convention praised small businesses and the Democratic response will praise the administration's role in helping job creators. But what would a non-partisan plan for entrepreneurs look like? The theme of the first day of the Republican National Convention was "We Built It," a rallying-cry from entrepreneurs who insisted that they didn't need government to start their businesses. This week, we can expect the Democratic response to highlight the ways Obama's administration has empowered job creators. But what would an entrepreneur-first platform, stripped of party politics, really look like?

Wireless power for the price of a penny? The newspaper-style printing of electronic equipment has led to a cost-effective device that could change the way we interact with everyday objects. For a price of just one penny per unit the device, known as a rectenna, which is presented August 10, in IOP Publishing's journal Nanotechnology, can be placed onto objects such as price tags, logos and signage so that we can read product information on our smartphones with one simple swipe. This type of technology, which is known as near-field communication (NFC), has already been implemented to allow fast money transactions; however, this new device could lead the way to large-scale adoption at a low cost. The rectenna, created by researchers from Sunchon National University and Paru Printed Electronics Research Institute, could be implemented onto everyday objects so that they can harness the power given off by the smartphone's radio waves and send information back to it via printed digital circuits.

‘This Is Water’: Complete Audio of David Foster Wallace’s Kenyon Graduation Speech (2005) Last month, on the occasion of the author’s 50th birthday, we posted a large collection of free essays and stories by David Foster Wallace. But we missed a rare item: the complete audio recording of the commencement address Wallace gave at Kenyon College, in Ohio, on May 21, 2005–three years before he took his own life. The text of the speech has been published on the Internet and as a book called This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life, but the complete audio version has been hard to find. In the speech, Wallace talks about the challenge of moving beyond the superficial kind of freedom that can be acquired through power and wealth, toward a truer liberation that arises only when we become more fully conscious of the world outside our “tiny skull-sized kingdoms.”

The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science by Bernard Chazelle hen the great Dane of 20th century physics, Niels Bohr, was not busy chewing on a juicy morsel of quantum mechanics, he was known to yap away witticisms worthy of Yogi Berra. The classic Bohrism “Prediction is difficult, especially about the future” alas came too late to save Lord Kelvin. Just as physics was set to debut in Einstein's own production of Extreme Makeover, Kelvin judged the time ripe to pen the field's obituary: “There is nothing new to be discovered in physics now.” Not his lordship's finest hour. Nor his worst.

Discovery in synthetic biology takes us a step closer to new 'industrial revolution' Scientists report that they have developed a method that cuts down the time it takes to make new 'parts' for microscopic biological factories from 2 days to only 6 hours. The scientists, from Imperial College London, say their research brings them another step closer to a new kind of industrial revolution, where parts for these biological factories could be mass-produced. These factories have a wealth of applications including better drug delivery treatments for patients, enhancements in the way that minerals are mined from deep underground and advances in the production of biofuels. Professor Paul Freemont, Co- Director of the Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation at Imperial College London and principle co-investigator of the study, which is published February 1 in the journal Nucleic Acids Research, says: "Before the industrial revolution most items were made by hand, which meant that they were slower to manufacture, more expensive to produce and limited in number.

TED-Ed website launches in beta, lets teachers customize video lessons TED-Ed Launches Groundbreaking Website with New Tools for Customized Learning TED-Ed Platform Allows Teachers to "Flip" Video Content and Create Tailored Lesson Plans NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--TED, the nonprofit organization devoted to "Ideas Worth Spreading," today launches the second phase of its TED-Ed initiative: a groundbreaking website [ housed on TED.com that enables teachers to create unique lesson plans around TED-Ed video content. "Kohl's is committed to kids' education and we are thrilled to partner with TED to provide inspiring educational tools for teachers and students around the world" TED-Ed seeks to inspire curiosity by harnessing the talent of the world's best teachers and visualizers – and by providing educators with new tools that spark and facilitate learning.

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