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Constructivism (learning theory)

Constructivism (learning theory)
Jean Piaget: founder of Constructivism In past centuries, constructivist ideas were not widely valued due to the perception that children's play was seen as aimless and of little importance. Jean Piaget did not agree with these traditional views, however. He saw play as an important and necessary part of the student's cognitive development and provided scientific evidence for his views. Today, constructivist theories are influential throughout much of the non-formal learning sector. One good example of constructivist learning in a non-formal setting is the Investigate Centre at The Natural History Museum, London. For more detailed information on the philosophy of the construction of human knowledge, see constructivist epistemology. Formalization of the theory of constructivism is generally attributed to Jean Piaget, who articulated mechanisms by which knowledge is internalized by learners. It is important to note that constructivism is not a particular pedagogy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constructivism_(philosophy_of_education)

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Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile Click to expand login or register menu Select to go to your workspace Select to go to your Dashboard Report What Does "Technology Integration" Mean? One reason why I love blogging is the chance to get a variety of responses to my ideas and thoughts. A reader of my last post commented: "This article describes how to help children learn to use an unfamiliar computer program. Is that what 'integrating technology' means?" This got me thinking: what do we really mean when we talk about "technology integration?"

Constructivism and the Student-Centered Approach "When you make the finding yourself — even if you’re the last person on Earth to see the light — you’ll never forget it." The terms "guide on the side" and "sage on the stage" describe two distinct educational models. Student-Centered Approach It is helpful to look critically at both teacher-centered and student-centered courses to see which technique might be worth adapting and which may not work for your course. Student-centered courses focus on the learner rather than the teacher.

Heutagogy, Self-Directed Learning and Complex Work Pedagogy had always established an unequal relation between the teacher and the taught. Andragogy stepped in to rectify this and foster awareness about how adults learned. However, the premise was that there was someone doing the "teaching" so to speak. While the principles of Andragogy clearly stated what it takes to motivate adults to learn, the role of a teacher / the expert remained undisputed. Knowles (1970, p7) defined self-directed learning as: “The process in which individuals take the initiative, with or without the help of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identifying human and material resources for learning, choosing and implementing learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes.” Then came Heutagogy advocating principles of self-determined learning.

About the NMC Login or Create New Account Member Spotlights RIT Launches Nation’s First Minor in Free and Open Source Software and Free Culture NMC Blog The 7 Things You Need to Openly Engage with Your Community iTUNES U Gaby Rodriguez, Toppenish High School, Fakes 6-Month Pregnancy For Senior Project TOPPENISH, Wash. — When Gaby Rodriguez took off her fake baby belly and revealed to her classmates that for months they had been part of an elaborate social experiment, she did more than force members of her community to examine how they treat pregnant teens – she got the attention of the nation. The Yakima Herald-Republic detailed the experience of the 17-year-old Rodriguez in a story Wednesday that caught the attention of shows like "Good Morning America" and resonated with viewers of popular teen mom reality shows. School officials said they and Rodriguez would have no more comment until she returns from a class trip next week.

June Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved.

Heutagogy and lifelong learning: A review of heutagogical practice and self-determined learning Lisa Marie Blaschke Oldenburg University and University of Maryland University College (UMUC) Abstract Heutagogy, a form of self-determined learning with practices and principles rooted in andragogy, has recently resurfaced as a learning approach after a decade of limited attention. In a heutagogical approach to teaching and learning, learners are highly autonomous and self-determined and emphasis is placed on development of learner capacity and capability with the goal of producing learners who are well-prepared for the complexities of today’s workplace. The approach has been proposed as a theory for applying to emerging technologies in distance education and for guiding distance education practice and the ways in which distance educators develop and deliver instruction using newer technologies such as social media.

Those Who Refuse To Unlearn, Deschool and Deprogram Will Be This Generation's Illiterate January 7, 2013 by MARCO TORRES Those Who Refuse To Unlearn, Deschool and Deprogram Will Be This Generation's Illiterate The general definitions and terminology for illiteracy vary depending on their orientation to specific subject areas. Most people assume illiteracy pertains solely to those with the inability to read or write simple sentences in any language. Teacher Magazine: Community Forums I think the question here is less about whether or not master's degrees have a strict causal effect on teaching and learning and more about whether or not public schools should have lock-step pay increases (for seniority or degrees earned). Or, lockstep teaching assignments (5 or 6 classes with a prep, a study hall, and a 25 minute lunch). If I, as a teacher, can make a strong case that my degree in nursing will help students - for example, by creating an interdisciplinary courses that combine my practical medical knowledge with fields of biology and mathematic, or ethics and literature - why should I not be compensated for that? Especially if it really does impact kids? The flip side is that you could get a degree and invest time and money into it and not be able to show a clear line between your experience and better results for kids.

Learning theory: models, product and process Learning theory: models, product and process. What is learning? Is it a change in behaviour or understanding? Is it a process? International Journal of Learning and Media - Full Text Efforts to understand the dynamic processes of learning situated across space and time, beyond the here and now, are presently challenging traditional definitions of learning and education. How can we conceptualize learning in a way that is able to respond to and explain the increasing complexity, connectivity, and velocity of our times? We elaborate on the notion of “connected learning” as a conceptual heuristic that has recently received recognition as a potential lens and a model through which to research and promote learning as a holistic experience that stretches beyond formal and informal communities. We reflect on the methodological challenges of describing, defining, and analyzing connected learning across young peoples’ everyday “learning lives” from the sociocultural and dialogic perspectives. We discuss such key notions for connected learning as understanding, tracking, and tracing learners; chronotopes; boundary crossing; intertextuality; and learning lives. 1.

Why Every School Needs an 'Innovation Day' Google’s policy of 20 percent time—giving employees plenty of free time work on whatever they want—is world famous for being the birthplace of innovative products— most famously, Gmail. But what would happen if schools gave students a similar amount of unstructured free time and allowed them to take control of their own learning? This spring Matthew Bebbington, a high school physical education teacher in the U.K., decided to find out. He organized a school-wide "Innovation Day" that let 80 students between the ages of 11-15 choose what and how to learn. Bebbington writes on The Guardian’s Teacher Network blog that far from taking an extended recess the students "worked solidly for six hours, cross-pollinating across different projects, ages and abilities."

The Travelling Teachers: Fakebook - let's have fun with biographies This is a very interesting tool to study biographies in a different way. With Fakebook you can invent a profile of any historical or fictional character. Your result will be a Facebook-like page!You can add images, links, videos, "friends", comments and "likes"! I think it could be very useful to study history or literature. Below you can see some Fakebook pages:

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