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Eric Berlow: How complexity leads to simplicity

Eric Berlow: How complexity leads to simplicity

http://www.ted.com/talks/eric_berlow_how_complexity_leads_to_simplicity.html

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Blog Archive » Measuring Innate Functional Brain Connectivity Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a method for safely measuring brain activity, has been around for about 15 years. Within the last 10 of those years a revolutionary, if mysterious, method has been developing using the technology. This method, resting state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI), has recently gained popularity for its putative ability to measure how brain regions interact innately (outside of any particular task context). Being able to measuring innate functional brain connectivity would allow us to know if a set of regions active during a particular task is, in fact, well connected enough generally to be considered a network. We could then predict what brain regions are likely to be active together in the future. This could, in turn, motivate us to look deeper at the nature of each brain region and how it contributes to the neuronal networks underlying our behavior.

Higgs Boson: Scientists May Be Closer To Finding Particle That Started Universe 2012 could be a big year for the Higgs Boson. Last week, a researcher promised to present something "interesting" next month related to the subatomic particle said to be the building block of the Universe. Scientists still have not proved the existence of the Higgs Boson particle, but Scientific American reports that at least one team of researchers may be getting closer to finding the elusive, so-called "God particle." Rob Roser, whose team has been culling through information from the recently shutdown Tevatron accelerator, said he hopes the data will show that scientists have almost certainly discovered the Higgs Boson.

Information design Information design is the practice of presenting information in a way that fosters efficient and effective understanding of it. The term has come to be used specifically for graphic design for displaying information effectively, rather than just attractively or for artistic expression. Information design is closely related to the field of data visualization and is often taught as part of graphic design courses.[1] Scaling of cities With urban population increasing dramatically worldwide, cities are playing an increasingly critical role in human societies and the sustainability of the planet. An obstacle to effective policy is the lack of meaningful urban metrics based on a quantitative understanding of cities. Typically, linear per capita indicators are used to characterize and rank cities. However, these implicitly ignore the fundamental role of nonlinear agglomeration integral to the life history of cities.

Why open data & the arts are natural partners #openarts - Edinburgh Festivals Innovation Lab In the run up to Culture Hackday, this is the latest post in our series on open data & the arts. Following on from Ben’s excellent introduction to what open data actually is (and isn’t), here we will start to articulate a vision for where this all might go. Clay Shirky, the renowned commentator on all things digital, has two phrases that I really like.

Presence by Peter Senge, C. Otto Scharmer, Joseph Jaworski, Betty Sue Flowers - Book - eBook Presence is an intimate look at the development of a new theory about change and learning. In wide-ranging conversations held over a year and a half, organizational learning pioneers Peter Senge, C. Otto Scharmer, Joseph Jaworski, and Betty Sue Flowers explored the nature of transformational change—how it arises, and the fresh possibilities it offers a world dangerously out of balance. The book introduces the idea of “presence”—a concept borrowed from the natural world that the whole is entirely present in any of its parts—to the worlds of business, education, government, and leadership. Too often, the authors found, we remain stuck in old patterns of seeing and acting. By encouraging deeper levels of learning, we create an awareness of the larger whole, leading to actions that can help to shape its evolution and our future.

Mashable From navigating the Web in entirely new ways to seeing where in the world twitters are coming from, data visualization tools are changing the way we view content. We found the following 16 apps both visually stunning and delightfully useful. Visualize Your Network with Fidg’tFidg’t is a desktop application that aims to let you visualize your network and its predisposition for different types of things like music and photos. Currently, the service has integrated with Flickr and last.fm, so for example, Fidg’t might show you if your network is attracted or repelled by Coldplay, or if it has a predisposition to taking photos of their weekend partying. As the service expands to support other networks (they suggest integrations with Facebook, digg, del.icio.us, and several others are in the works), this one could become very interesting. BigSpy places stories at the top of the screen as they are dugg.

Download Download NeuroSolutions Products Most software companies do not allow you try out their programs before you buy them. They may give you a flashy slide show for free, but not a working evaluation copy of the software. We on the other hand provide you with working copies of NeuroSolutions products that will allow you to design, train and test a neural network with your own data. Our Neurosolutions download includes NeuroSolutions, NeuroSolutions for Excel, NeuroSolutions Accelerator* and Custom Solution Wizard. To Tug the Heartstrings, Music Must First Tickle the Brain “The song has that triplet going on underneath that pushes it along, and at a certain point I wanted it to stop because the story suddenly turns very serious,” Mr. Simon said in an interview. “The stopping of sounds and rhythms,” he added, “it’s really important, because, you know, how can I miss you unless you’re gone? If you just keep the thing going like a loop, eventually it loses its power.”

Viktor Frankl on the Human Search for Meaning by Maria Popova “Live as if you were living already for the second time and as if you had acted the first time as wrongly as you are about to act now!” Celebrated Austrian psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl, born on March 26, 1905, remains best-known for his indispensable 1946 psychological memoir Man’s Search for Meaning (public library) — a meditation on what the gruesome experience of Auschwitz taught him about the primary purpose of life: the quest for meaning, which sustained those who survived. For Frankl, meaning came from three possible sources: purposeful work, love, and courage in the face of difficulty. In examining the “intensification of inner life” that helped prisoners stay alive, he considers the transcendental power of love: Love goes very far beyond the physical person of the beloved.

infographics Infographics News, a somewhat new BlogSpot blog, has a short list from Ninian Carter of some great infographics of the last year. Ninian Carter is an scottish infographic journalist, well, the Phineas Fogg of the infographic journalists: he has worked in Scotland, England, France, Australia… and his last job was in Canada, at The Globe & Mail, place he left recently. So, as the A Team, he is avalaible for works… (if you click on his name, opening the post, you’ll go to his personal web). Once you get past the horrible spelling of the article (spell-check people, it’s a handy feature), it’s a nice collection of infographics. I’ll probably post some of these online throughout the day in full-size.

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