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VHIL: Virtual Human Interaction Lab - Stanford University

VHIL: Virtual Human Interaction Lab - Stanford University
Related:  Complex Systems

Global Dynamics Processes: the Pattern which Connects from KaliYuga to Tao 101 Left to right: Giuseppi Cocconi, Philip Morrison, Frank Drake While interest in the question of extraterrestrial life is at least as old as historical civilizations, the modern SETI era can be defined as beginning in 1959. In that year, Cornell physicists Giuseppi Cocconi and Philip Morrison published an article in Nature in which they pointed out the potential for using microwave radio to communicate between the stars. A young radio astronomer, Frank Drake, had independently reached the same conclusion, and in the spring of 1960 conducted the first microwave radio search for signals from other solar systems. In the 1960's, the Soviet Union dominated SETI, and it frequently adopted bold strategies. At the beginning of the 1970's, NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California began to consider the technology required for an effective search. As the perception grew that SETI had a reasonable prospect for success, the Americans once again began to observe.

The Global Brain Institute The GBI uses scientific methods to better understand the global evolution towards ever-stronger connectivity between people, software and machines. By developing concrete models of this development, we can anticipate both its promises and its perils. That would help us to steer a course towards the best possible outcome for humanity. Objectives (for more details, check our strategic objectives and activities) Assumptions We see people, machines and software systems as agents that communicate via a complex network of communication links. Challenges that cannot be fully resolved by a single agent are propagated to other agents, along the links in the network. The propagation of challenges across the global network is a complex process of self-organization.

John Seely Brown keynote address at KMWorld 2012: The entrepreneurial learners In a keynote address at the 2012 KMWorld Conference in Washington, D.C., in October, John Seely Brown, a visiting scholar at USC and independent co-chairman of the Deloitte Center for the Edge, spoke on the topic, "The Entrepreneurial Learners." That term has nothing to do with learning to become an entrepreneur, he says. Rather, it has everything to do with how you foster a disposition of constantly looking around and understanding how to see new resources, grab new resources and do new things, developing what he calls a "questing disposition." The essence of entrepreneurial learning is being constantly alert, aware and interested in the resources available and in how we build connections. Brown says that in past centuries, the infrastructure has largely been stable, but that the 21st century is driven by continual, exponential advances in computation, with no stability in sight. In mentioning changes in recent years, Brown talks about how he grew up in a client-server environment.

Explain that stuff! Science and technology made simple IFT.org Thinking in Systems by Donella Meadows "Dana Meadows' exposition in this book exhibits a degree of clarity and simplicity that can only be attained by one who profoundly and honestly understands the subject at hand--in this case systems modeling. Many thanks to Diana Wright for bringing this extra legacy from Dana to us."—Herman Daly, Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland at College Park In the years following her role as the lead author of the international bestseller, Limits to Growth—the first book to show the consequences of unchecked growth on a finite planet— Donella Meadows remained a pioneer of environmental and social analysis until her untimely death in 2001. Meadows’ newly released manuscript, Thinking in Systems, is a concise and crucial book offering insight for problem solving on scales ranging from the personal to the global. Some of the biggest problems facing the world—war, hunger, poverty, and environmental degradation—are essentially system failures. About the Author Donella Meadows

Systems Thinking Resources - The Donella Meadows Institute Concepts and Frameworks The Five Learning Disciplines Developed by renowned systems thinker Peter Senge, these five disciplines each enhance the ability of a person or organization to use learning effectively. The five learning disciplines are Personal MasteryMental ModelsShared VisionTeam LearningSystems Thinking For descriptions of each of these disciplines, visit the Society for Organizational Learning’s website. U Process U Process, also know as Theory U, is a useful methodology for collectively approaching difficult problems and developing innovative, appropriate solutions. For more information about U Process, visit the Presencing Institute. Biomimicry Biomimicry is the concept of using natural forms, materials, and processes as models to drive human innovation. The Biomimicry Guild has a great introduction to this approach to problem solving. Double Loop Learning Tools The Iceberg Model We have a copy of the iceberg model hanging in our office. The Bathtub Theorem Open Space World Café

Human-based computation Human-based computation (HBC) is a computer science technique in which a machine performs its function by outsourcing certain steps to humans. This approach uses differences in abilities and alternative costs between humans and computer agents to achieve symbiotic human-computer interaction. In traditional computation, a human employs a computer[1] to solve a problem; a human provides a formalized problem description and an algorithm to a computer, and receives a solution to interpret. Human-based computation frequently reverses the roles; the computer asks a person or a large group of people to solve a problem, then collects, interprets, and integrates their solutions. Early work[edit] Human-based computation (apart from the historical meaning of "computer") research has its origins in the early work on interactive evolutionary computation. A concept of the automatic Turing test pioneered by Moni Naor (1996) is another precursor of human-based computation. Alternative terms[edit]

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