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Self-organization

Self-organization
Self-organization occurs in a variety of physical, chemical, biological, robotic, social and cognitive systems. Common examples include crystallization, the emergence of convection patterns in a liquid heated from below, chemical oscillators, swarming in groups of animals, and the way neural networks learn to recognize complex patterns. Overview[edit] The most robust and unambiguous examples[1] of self-organizing systems are from the physics of non-equilibrium processes. Self-organization is also relevant in chemistry, where it has often been taken as being synonymous with self-assembly. The concept of self-organization is central to the description of biological systems, from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Self-organization usually relies on three basic ingredients:[3] Strong dynamical non-linearity, often though not necessarily involving positive and negative feedbackBalance of exploitation and explorationMultiple interactions Principles of self-organization[edit] Examples[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-organization

Related:  swarm organizationWaves,Math Concepts, Shapes(orders)patterns in the universeInner SearchComplexity

It's Time to Invert the Management Pyramid - Vineet Nayar by Vineet Nayar | 1:57 PM October 8, 2008 As time passes by, people and things change. Now, what if time passes by and people change, but things that should change, don’t? Complex systems Complex systems present problems both in mathematical modelling and philosophical foundations. The study of complex systems represents a new approach to science that investigates how relationships between parts give rise to the collective behaviors of a system and how the system interacts and forms relationships with its environment.[1] Such systems are used to model processes in computer science, biology,[2] economics, physics, chemistry,[3] and many other fields. It is also called complex systems theory, complexity science, study of complex systems, sciences of complexity, non-equilibrium physics, and historical physics.

Self-Organization & Entropy - The Terrible Twins by Chris Lucas "Order is not pressure which is imposed on society from without, but an equilibrium which is set up from within."José Ortega y Gasset, Mirabeau and Politics, 1927 "Freedom and constraint are two aspects of the same necessity, which is to be what one is and no other." Cooperative In short, a coop can be defined as "a jointly owned enterprise engaging in the production or distribution of goods or the supplying of services, operated by its members for their mutual benefit, typically organized by consumers or farmers."[4] Cooperative businesses are typically more economically resilient than many other forms of enterprise, with twice the number of co-operatives (80%) surviving their first five years compared with other business ownership models (41%).[5] Cooperatives frequently have social goals which they aim to accomplish by investing a proportion of trading profits back into their communities.

Chaos Theory: A Brief Introduction What exactly is chaos? The name "chaos theory" comes from the fact that the systems that the theory describes are apparently disordered, but chaos theory is really about finding the underlying order in apparently random data. When was chaos first discovered? The first true experimenter in chaos was a meteorologist, named Edward Lorenz. In 1960, he was working on the problem of weather prediction. He had a computer set up, with a set of twelve equations to model the weather.

Is your organization ready to “swarm”? Gartner has published a fascinating list of how the world of work may change as we move forward. The ideas posed within the article were intriguing. But one idea in particular – the concept of a “work swarm” – caught my attention. Work must change to meet the world Borrowed from nature, Gartner describes a work swarm as a “flurry of collective activity” to deal with non routine problems at work.

Complex Adaptive Systems: 9 Cellular Automaton + Related Videos - Mashpedia In this video we are going to discuss cellular automata, we will firstly talk about what they are before looking at a classical example, we will then discuss individually the different classes of patterns that cellular automata can generate before wrapping-up with a talk about their significance as a new approach to mathematical modeling. For full courses, transcriptions & downloads please see: Twitter: Facebook: Transcription Excerpt: Cellular automata are algorithmic models that use computation to iterate on very simple rules, in so doing these very simple rules can create complex emergent phenomena through the interaction between agents as they evolve over time. To illustrate the functioning of a cellular automaton we will take an example from probably the most famous algorithm called the Game Of Life devised by the mathematician John Conway. The Game Of Life is played on a grid of square cells.

Self-Organization Definitions aka Order, Autopoesis, Negentropy, ExtropyLovelock on Negentropy (Inverse Entropy, Negative Entropy) "The great physicist Ludwig Boltzmann expressed the meaning of the second law in an equation of great seemliness and simplicity: S=k(lnP), where S is that strange quantity entropy; k is a constant rightly called the Boltzmann constant; and lnP is the natural logarithm of the probability. It means what it says--the less probable something is, the lower its entropy. The most improbable thing of all, life, is therefore to be associated with the lowest entropy. Schrödinger was not happy to associate something as significant as life with a diminished quantity, entropy. He proposed, instead, the term 'negentropy,' the reciprocal of entropy--that is, 1 divided by entropy or 1/S.

Five Manifestos for the Creative Life by Kirstin Butler How a numbered list can start a personal revolution. Some days everyone needs a little extra encouragement. The words or lines or colors don’t want to come, or worse, we don’t even want to sit down to create. That’s when we turn to these inspiring manifestos, any one of which is guaranteed to give our uncooperative creativity a sharp kick in the pants. Here are five of our favorite contemporary manifestos that nudge ideas out of your head and into the hands of the world.

Francis Heylighen Francis Paul Heylighen (born 1960) is a Belgian cyberneticist investigating the emergence and evolution of intelligent organization. He presently works as a research professor at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, the Dutch-speaking Free University of Brussels, where he directs the transdisciplinary research group on "Evolution, Complexity and Cognition"[1][2] and the Global Brain Institute. He is best known for his work on the Principia Cybernetica Project, his model of the Internet as a Global brain, and his contributions to the theories of memetics and self-organization. Biography[edit] Francis Heylighen was born on September 27, 1960 in Vilvoorde, Belgium. He received his high school education from the "Koninklijk Atheneum Pitzemburg" in Mechelen, in the section Latin-Mathematics.

Says the World of Work Will Witness 10 Changes During the Next 10 Years Egham, UK, , August 4, 2010 View All Press Releases Gartner Analysts to Discuss the Changing Nature of Work at Gartner Portals, Content and Collaboration Summit 2010 in London, UK, September 15-16   The world of today is dramatically different from 20 years ago and with the lines between work and non-work already badly frayed, Gartner, Inc. predicts that the nature of work will witness 10 key changes through 2020. Organizations will need to plan for increasingly chaotic environments that are out of their direct control, and adaptation must involve adjusting to all 10 of the trends.

Audio time-scale/pitch modification - Wikipedia These processes are used, for instance, to match the pitches and tempos of two pre-recorded clips for mixing when the clips cannot be reperformed or resampled. (A drum track containing no pitched instruments could be moderately resampled for tempo without adverse effects, but a pitched track could not). They are also used to create effects such as increasing the range of an instrument (like pitch shifting a guitar down an octave). Resampling[edit] Frame-based approach[edit] Frame-based approach of many TSM procedures Origin of Life - God's Utility Function God's Utility Function Transcript Hi.

101 Timeless Lessons Life Teaches post written by: Angel Chernoff Email Take everything you’ve ever learned – all the crazy experiences and lessons – and place it all in a box labeled “Thank you.” What has life taught you? Think about all the things you would love to tell yourself if you could travel back in time to give your younger self some advice about life. This is what our sister site, Everyday Life Lessons, is all about.

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