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Top 10 quirky science tricks for parties

Top 10 quirky science tricks for parties
Related:  physics

The Second Law and Energy (second law event) 10/05/2007 1:00 PM Broad InstituteSteven Chu, Secretary of EnergyDescription: This Nobel Prize"winning scientist admits to staying up late the night before his talk to bone up on thermodynamics. He puts his research to good use, discussing the history and application of the laws of thermodynamics, which have served as "the scientific foundation of how we harness energy, and the basis of the industrial revolution, the wealth of nations." Taking Watt's 1765 steam engine, Stephen Chu illustrates basic principles of thermodynamics -- that energy is conserved, that you can do work from heat, especially when you maximize the difference in temperature in the system and minimize heat dissipation from friction. The game hasn't changed all that much in the past few centuries. Another potentially rich energy source, Chu says, involves converting sun light into fuel the way plants do in photosynthesis. credit MIT World -- special events and lectures license MIT TechTV

Smoke Bomb - How to Make a Smoke Bomb Video Making a smoke bomb is fun, easy and safe with sugar and potassium nitrate. This video will teach you how to make and use a smoke bomb.See Transcript Today, I'm going to show you how make a homemade smoke bomb. Smoke Bomb Materials You will need: A large mixing bowlA skillet or sauté panSugarPotassium Nitrate also known as salt peter, which you can order onlineAn empty toilet paper roll.CardboardGlue or masking tapeScissorsFace Tissue Mix Smoke Bomb Ingredients Cut out a small piece of cardboard, and glue or tape it to the bottom of the empty toilet paper roll. In the large mixing bowl, combine three parts potassium nitrate with two parts sugar and mix well. Create Smoke Bomb Fuse In order to make a fuse for the smoke bomb, cut a small rectangle of tissue. Heat Mixture and Finish Smoke Bomb Pour the mixture into the skillet or sauté pan, and apply low heat. Pour the mixture into the toilet paper roll, and insert the fuse. Lighting the Smoke Bomb

General relativity General relativity, or the general theory of relativity, is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1916[1] and the current description of gravitation in modern physics. General relativity generalizes special relativity and Newton's law of universal gravitation, providing a unified description of gravity as a geometric property of space and time, or spacetime. In particular, the curvature of spacetime is directly related to the energy and momentum of whatever matter and radiation are present. The relation is specified by the Einstein field equations, a system of partial differential equations. Some predictions of general relativity differ significantly from those of classical physics, especially concerning the passage of time, the geometry of space, the motion of bodies in free fall, and the propagation of light. Einstein's theory has important astrophysical implications. History[edit] Albert Einstein developed the theories of special and general relativity.

How To Build A Fireball You Can Hold Video Free Physics Video and Audio Courses These are the free physics video and audio courses. They are ordered based on their difficulty, starting with easiest first and ending with the most difficult. Also if you love physics, check out my friend's video websites dedicated to three famous physicists: And here are the physics video lectures: Descriptive introduction to physics: No prior physics is required. Classical Mechanics: In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture #35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World. Introductory Physics Introduction to forces, kinetics, equilibria, fluids, waves, and heat. Electricity and Magnetism: Vibrations and Waves: Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials

Learn how to throw lethal playing cards If you watch the following video, you will be able to see one of the world’s leading card-throwing experts practicing his craft. With a business card and a flick of his wrist he can pop balloons, extinguish candles, hit targets, etc.: Around the 50-second point, you will also see him impale a tomato with a business card. Around 3:15, Rick Smith demonstrates his technique very quickly. How to throw cards fast and effectively !!!!! See also: If you need a source of cheap playing cards, check out the dollar store – two decks for a buck. One level up from card throwing is knife throwing: - the fastest knife thrower in the world - How to throw knives [[[Jump to previous How To - How to blow your money if you are super-wealthy]]]

Physics World reveals its top 10 breakthroughs for 2011 The two physics stories that dominated the news in 2011 were questions rather than solid scientific results, namely "Do neutrinos travel faster than light?" and "Has the Higgs boson been found?". However, there have also been some fantastic bona fide research discoveries over the last 12 months, which made it difficult to decide on the Physics World 2011 Breakthrough of the Year. But after much debate among the Physics World editorial team, this year's honour goes to Aephraim Steinberg and colleagues from the University of Toronto in Canada for their experimental work on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. We have also awarded nine runners-up (see below). 1st place: Shifting the morals of quantum measurement Steinberg's work stood out because it challenges the widely held notion that quantum mechanics forbids us any knowledge of the paths taken by individual photons as they travel through two closely spaced slits to create an interference pattern. How to ask a 'forbidden question'

Quantum Diaries (Thoughts on work and life from particle physicists from around the world.) Gravitational lens A light source passes behind a gravitational lens (point mass placed in the center of the image). The aqua circle is the light source as it would be seen if there was no lens, white spots are the multiple images (or Einstein ring) of the source. A gravitational lens is a distribution of matter (such as a cluster of galaxies) between a distant light source and an observer, that is capable of bending the light from the source as the light travels towards the observer. This effect is known as gravitational lensing, and the amount of bending is one of the predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.[1][2] (Classical physics also predicts the bending of light, but only half that predicted by general relativity.[3]) Although Einstein made unpublished calculations on the subject in 1912,[4] Orest Khvolson (1924)[5] and Frantisek Link (1936)[citation needed] are generally credited with being the first to discuss the effect in print. Description[edit] 1. 2. 3. History[edit] Notes

Gravitational microlensing Gravitational microlensing is an astronomical phenomenon due to the gravitational lens effect. It can be used to detect objects ranging from the mass of a planet to the mass of a star, regardless of the light they emit. Typically, astronomers can only detect bright objects that emit lots of light (stars) or large objects that block background light (clouds of gas and dust). These objects make up only a tiny fraction of the mass of a galaxy. When a distant star or quasar gets sufficiently aligned with a massive compact foreground object, the bending of light due to its gravitational field, as discussed by Einstein in 1915, leads to two distorted unresolved images resulting in an observable magnification. Since microlensing observations do not rely on radiation received from the lens object, this effect therefore allows astronomers to study massive objects no matter how faint. Microlensing by an isolated object was first detected in 1989. How it works[edit] Observing microlensing[edit] .

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