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Top 10 quirky science tricks for parties

Top 10 quirky science tricks for parties

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_f3SkxTWxc

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The Second Law and Energy (second law event) 10/05/2007 1:00 PM Broad InstituteSteven Chu, Secretary of EnergyDescription: This Nobel Prize"winning scientist admits to staying up late the night before his talk to bone up on thermodynamics. He puts his research to good use, discussing the history and application of the laws of thermodynamics, which have served as "the scientific foundation of how we harness energy, and the basis of the industrial revolution, the wealth of nations." Taking Watt's 1765 steam engine, Stephen Chu illustrates basic principles of thermodynamics -- that energy is conserved, that you can do work from heat, especially when you maximize the difference in temperature in the system and minimize heat dissipation from friction.

GeekMusic Upload Subscription preferences Loading... Working... Liastnir 10 Amazing Tales of Alien Abduction - Oddee.com (alien abduction, martians...) Are alien life forms visiting Earth and performing experiments upon unwitting human victims? This is one of the world's greatest mysteries! Read on to discover ten of the most famous and astounding cases of alien abduction ever documented. The Allagash Waterway Abduction One of the most famous cases of alien abduction is The Allagash Waterway Abduction, which took place in Maine in 1976. Twin brothers Jack and Jim Weiner and their friends Chuck Rak and Charlie Foltz were all artists. General relativity General relativity, or the general theory of relativity, is the geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1916[1] and the current description of gravitation in modern physics. General relativity generalizes special relativity and Newton's law of universal gravitation, providing a unified description of gravity as a geometric property of space and time, or spacetime. In particular, the curvature of spacetime is directly related to the energy and momentum of whatever matter and radiation are present. The relation is specified by the Einstein field equations, a system of partial differential equations.

How to Suck at Facebook All artwork and content on this site is Copyright © 2015 Matthew Inman. Please don't steal. TheOatmeal.com was lovingly built using CakePHP 7 Most Extreme Paths El Caminito Del Rey (Spain) Adrenaline-junkies have been flocking to southern Spain to experience the 110-year-old El Caminito Del Rey. And you don't need to be an experienced climber either, the only requirements are that walkers should be at least twelve years old and have a good head for heights. The trail, also known as the King's Pathway, was originally built in 1905 for workers to travel between two hydroelectric power plants but was closed-off in 2000 after two walkers fell to their deaths. Huashan Cliffside Path (China)

Free Physics Video and Audio Courses These are the free physics video and audio courses. They are ordered based on their difficulty, starting with easiest first and ending with the most difficult. Also if you love physics, check out my friend's video websites dedicated to three famous physicists: And here are the physics video lectures: Broadcast Yourself. Respect the YouTube Community We're not asking for the kind of respect reserved for nuns, the elderly, and brain surgeons. We mean don't abuse the site. Every cool new community feature on YouTube involves a certain level of trust.

Ten 100-year predictions that came true 11 January 2012Last updated at 00:09 By Tom Geoghegan BBC News Magazine John Watkins predicted Americans would be taller, tanks would exist and C, X and Q would no longer feature in our everyday alphabet In 1900, an American civil engineer called John Elfreth Watkins made a number of predictions about what the world would be like in 2000. How did he do? As is customary at the start of a new year, the media have been full of predictions about what may happen in the months ahead. But a much longer forecast made in 1900 by a relatively unknown engineer has been recirculating in the past few days.

Physics World reveals its top 10 breakthroughs for 2011 The two physics stories that dominated the news in 2011 were questions rather than solid scientific results, namely "Do neutrinos travel faster than light?" and "Has the Higgs boson been found?". However, there have also been some fantastic bona fide research discoveries over the last 12 months, which made it difficult to decide on the Physics World 2011 Breakthrough of the Year. But after much debate among the Physics World editorial team, this year's honour goes to Aephraim Steinberg and colleagues from the University of Toronto in Canada for their experimental work on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics.

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