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Vilayanur Ramachandran: The neurons that shaped civilization

Vilayanur Ramachandran: The neurons that shaped civilization

http://www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_the_neurons_that_shaped_civilization.html

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Vilayanur Ramachadran describes a type of neurons he calls 'mirror neurons'. Mirror neurons fire not only when experiencing a 'stimulus' but also when observing someone else experiencing the stimulus. They allow us to learn complex social behaviours. This presentation expands on his previous talk "VS Ramachandran on your mind" and shows results found by learning from brain damage. Vilayanur Ramachadran claims humans devellopped these mirror neurons about 100.000 years ago and afterwards human culture devellopped ashtonishingly fast; but compare this to "Susan Savage-Rumbaugh on apes". by kaspervandenberg Nov 5

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