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VS Ramachandran: The neurons that shaped civilization

VS Ramachandran: The neurons that shaped civilization

http://www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_the_neurons_that_shaped_civilization.html

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My Father, the Philosopher If the bed was here, if I touched it, lay down in it, walked away and came back, then it existed. If it existed, then when I left for school and came back, it would still be there. If it was there today, then it would be there tomorrow. Right, Dad? I touched the objects in the house. Networks of Genome Data Will Transform Medicine Breakthrough Technical standards that let DNA databases communicate. Why It Matters Innovative Brain Imaging Combines Sound And Light Lihong Wang uses light and sound to create highly detailed images of the living brain. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption toggle caption Chris Nickels for NPR Lihong Wang uses light and sound to create highly detailed images of the living brain.

Greenberg Educational Consulting Organization Education should be a process and time of unfettered learning and exploration, but all too often it is bogged down with too many rules, short-sighted narrow focus, and a lack of inspired leadership. Education defines our society and if we want a humane and egalitarian society, we need leaders and members who all strive for the depth of knowledge, skill, compassion and wisdom that is achievable through simple daily practice and regular critical review. Because daily efforts require time, energy, and motivation and there is a lot of noise in society I am building this site to help you find and use ideas worth using. To help us all upgrade our mentality, wisdom, skill (add your goals here), what I’m working to build here is a site that works like a college education should – providing Exposure to people you haven’t met yet, ideas you haven’t heard yet and ways of thinking, arguing, and behaving that you haven’t done yet. Why mention all this?

Mind Reading A mind reading machine has edged closer to reality after scientists found a way of converting thoughts into words. Researchers were able to render brain signals into speech for the first time, relying on sensors attached to the brain surface. The breakthrough, which is up to 90 percent accurate, will be a boon for paralysed patients who cannot speak and could help read anyone’s thoughts ultimately, reports the Telegraph. “We were beside ourselves with excitement when it started working,” said Prof Bradley Greger, bioengineer at the Utah University who led the project. There's a Word for That: 25 Expressions You Should Have in Your Vocabulary Recently I came across this amazing little Tumblr named ‘OtherWordly‘ – itself a play on words. It consists of a collection of strange and lovely words from different languages through different times. What I like most about this selection of consonants and vowels – little meaning-carrying packages of vibration – is that they all try to point to the unspeakable, the transient or the neglected.

We're More than Stardust — We're Made of the Big Bang Itself Transcript Anna Frebel: The work of stellar archaeology really goes to the heart of the "we are stardust" and "we are children of the stars" statement. You’ve probably heard it all but what does it actually mean? We are mostly made all humans and all life forms that we know of are made mostly of carbon and a bunch of other elements but in much lesser quantities. Where does this carbon come from? Well, you could say it comes from the Earth and yes that is true. Controlling RNA in living cells MIT researchers have devised a new set of proteins that can be customized to bind arbitrary RNA sequences, making it possible to image RNA inside living cells, monitor what a particular RNA strand is doing, and even control RNA activity. The new strategy is based on human RNA-binding proteins that normally help guide embryonic development. The research team adapted the proteins so that they can be easily targeted to desired RNA sequences. “You could use these proteins to do measurements of RNA generation, for example, or of the translation of RNA to proteins,” says Edward Boyden, an associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at the MIT Media Lab. “This could have broad utility throughout biology and bioengineering.”

Vilayanur Ramachadran describes a type of neurons he calls 'mirror neurons'. Mirror neurons fire not only when experiencing a 'stimulus' but also when observing someone else experiencing the stimulus. They allow us to learn complex social behaviours. This presentation expands on his previous talk "VS Ramachandran on your mind" and shows results found by learning from brain damage. Vilayanur Ramachadran claims humans devellopped these mirror neurons about 100.000 years ago and afterwards human culture devellopped ashtonishingly fast; but compare this to "Susan Savage-Rumbaugh on apes". by kaspervandenberg Nov 5

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