background preloader

Amnesty International USA - Protect Human Rights

Amnesty International USA - Protect Human Rights

American Civil Liberties Union | Justice Doesn’t Come Cheap. Can the ICC Afford It? The Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) of the International Criminal Court (ICC) made public new findings on Tuesday with respect to alleged crimes committed in Nigeria. After receiving 59 complaints since 2005, the OTP has concluded that there are grounds to believe that Boko Haram, a militia group mainly active in northeastern Nigeria, has committed the crimes against humanity of murder and persecution. The OTP report said it had found that the group has, since July 2009, “launched a widespread and systematic attack that has resulted in the killing of more than 1,200 Christian and Muslims civilians in different locations throughout Nigeria.” This moves the OTP into the final stages of its decision whether to open a new investigation. The ICC depends on voluntary cooperation from states in order to implement its mandate. States have consistently demanded that the ICC comply with a “zero growth” approach to its budget. The Nigeria findings show that the demands on the OTP will not decrease.

Citizens for Tax Justice Global Issues : social, political, economic and environmental issues that affect us all Non-governmental organization A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization that is neither a part of a government nor a conventional for-profit business. Usually set up by ordinary citizens, NGOs may be funded by governments, foundations, businesses, or private persons. Some avoid formal funding altogether and are run primarily by volunteers. The number of NGOs in the United States is estimated at 1.5 million.[1] Russia has 277,000 NGOs.[2] India is estimated to have had around 2 million NGOs in 2009, just over one NGO per 600 Indians, and many times the number of primary schools and primary health centres in India.[3][4] The term "non-governmental organization" was first coined in 1945, when the United Nations (UN) was created.[6] The UN, itself an inter-governmental organization, made it possible for certain approved specialized international non-state agencies—i.e., non-governmental organizations—to be awarded observer status at its assemblies and some of its meetings. Types[edit] By orientation[edit]

The Pixel Project Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Access to water and sanitation is a fundamental human right and essential to life, health and dignity. Timely and adequate provision of clean water and sanitation services to uprooted people is particularly important, given the vulnerability of their situation. The UN believes that all refugees, asylum seekers, internally displaced people and returnees should have access to adequate drinking water whether they stay in camps or in urban areas [ECOSOC, 2002]. The provision of adequate sanitation services is equally important. Proper disposal of all waste as well as control of the carriers of communicable diseases, including mosquitoes, rats, mice and flies, is crucial to mitigate health risks and prevent epidemics. But the optimum benefit from water and sanitation interventions can only be achieved if communities and individuals are made aware of the links between hygiene practices, poor sanitation, polluted water sources and disease.

Mamas, Don't Let the New Atheism Grow Up to Be the Same Old Shit in a Different Package Damon Linker recently wrote a piece for The New Republic about what he calls "the new atheism" (as represented by Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens) and its potential to undermine the very principles (progressive liberalism and secular politics, particularly) it asserts to advocate. Now, there are problems with the article; it simplifies atheism so it can be neatly divided into two strands, and it ignores altogether that strident anti-religiosity is not unique to atheists. It also falls into the trap, right from the title ("Atheism's Wrong Turn"), that so many articles on religion have—treating atheists as a monolithic group. (Was the federal marriage amendment, for example, "Christianity's wrong turn"?) Beyond that slim (and rather unconvincing) example, there is precious little support for the idea that the "new" atheists are on their way to rivaling Christian conservatives with, say, detailed policy proposals for faithless-based initiatives, ahem. [See also: Yglesias and DJW.]

Rethink Afghanistan War World Security Institute

Related: