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Kübler-Ross model The model was first introduced by Swiss-American Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying, and was inspired by her work with terminally ill patients.[1] Motivated by the lack of curriculum in medical schools on the subject of death and dying, Kübler-Ross began a project which examined death and those faced with it while working as an instructor at the University of Chicago's medical school. Kübler-Ross' project evolved into a series of seminars which, along with patient interviews and previous research became the foundation for her book, and revolutionized how the U.S. medical field takes care of the terminally ill. In the decades since the publication of "On Death and Dying", the Kübler-Ross concept has become largely accepted by the general public; however, its validity has yet to be consistently supported by the majority of research studies that have examined it[citation needed]. Stages[edit] The stages, popularly known by the acronym DABDA, include:[2]

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit. 1. 2. 3. 4. Pangea was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras, forming about 300 million years ago. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 37. 38. 39. 40. Credits: TwistedSifter

Hurricane Sandy vs. Katrina Infographic Examines Destruction From Both Storms Over 100 people have died in the U.S. alone so far from Hurricane Sandy, and concerns are mounting that with hundreds of thousands still without power in frigid temperatures, the death toll will continue to climb. As the East Coast examines the destruction, comparisons have been made to other catastrophic storms. Hurricane Katrina, which ravaged the Gulf Coast in 2005, killed over 1,800 people and cost nearly $125 billion. Both storms were deadly, destructive and devastating to the thousands who lost their homes and livelihoods. View the infographic below to see how they compare by the numbers. Infographic by Tim Wallace and Jaweed Kaleem. Editor’s note: This infographic has been updated to to reflect new and more comprehensive data on the number of people displaced or who will potentially be displaced by Hurricane Sandy-related damage, including people in shelters and people who are not in shelters but have had to leave their homes.

Ohio Republican Secretary of State sued over order to discard provisional ballots Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, whose decision to try to restrict early voting was thrown out first by an Ohio judge, then a federal appeals court and denied a hearing by the U.S. Supreme Court, will be back in court again this month after he issued a last-minute directive on provisional ballots that not only contradicts Ohio law but is also in violation of a recent court decision and the opposite of what Husted’s own lawyers said he would do. As reported by Judd Legum at ThinkProgress, Husted ordered election officials not to fill out a section of the provisional ballot that verifies what form of identification that the voter produced and that, if it is incorrectly filled out, the ballot will automatically not be counted. Husted has until Monday to respond to the suit, and the court has said that it plans to resolve the issue before provisional ballots are counted on November 17, 2012. [Image via ProgressOhio, Creative Commons licensed]

Mamas, Don't Let the New Atheism Grow Up to Be the Same Old Shit in a Different Package Damon Linker recently wrote a piece for The New Republic about what he calls "the new atheism" (as represented by Dawkins, Dennett, Harris, and Hitchens) and its potential to undermine the very principles (progressive liberalism and secular politics, particularly) it asserts to advocate. Now, there are problems with the article; it simplifies atheism so it can be neatly divided into two strands, and it ignores altogether that strident anti-religiosity is not unique to atheists. It also falls into the trap, right from the title ("Atheism's Wrong Turn"), that so many articles on religion have—treating atheists as a monolithic group. But, despite those caveats, and some other quibbles, it made a fair point about movement atheism's capacity to subvert its purported objectives with regard to a secular public sphere, if it begins to actively pursue an injection of atheism as a religious replacement, as opposed to merely removing public references to theist beliefs.

Liberating Structures - Liberating Structures Menu Infographic: Absolute zero to ‘absolute hot’ How cold can it get on Earth? How hot can hot truly get? And, perhaps more importantly, what’s the ideal temperature a hazelnut souffle should be cooked at? All important questions, and to find out the answers we’ve created the ultimate thermometer, which takes you from absolute zero to what scientists think is the absolute heat limit. Dress appropriately. To see more infographics, click here

Crime After The Theft: How Burglars Turn Your Stuff Into Cash | Wireless Security System Ever wonder what happens to a home burglary victim’s valuables? We all know that burglars aren’t burglarizing homes to furnish their own home. They’re looking to cash in on their new found booty, but how are they turning your valuables into cold hard cash? Hi, it’s Bob again, your local neighborhood burglar! Sorry for the hiatus, the summer months are my busiest!. When SimpliSafe asked me back for information for this upcoming article, I thought to myself: “Sure, why not? Here's what happens to your valuables after the burglary: There is one simple reason I'm breaking into your home: to turn your valuables into cash. So, you’re wondering where a burglar takes your stuff to convert it into cash. The Pawn Shop Usually one of my first stops after successfully breaking into someone’s home is the pawnshop. Depending where I am, I have good connections with a few shop owners. Some of the stolen items I take into a pawn shop are jewelry, electronics, collectibles, musical instruments, and tools.

EXCLUSIVE: This Is The First Poll Of 2012 That Actually Asks The Hard Questions Stephen Colbert is leading Jon Stewart 3-to-1 among Republicans, 1 in 5 voters think their vote is worth $100 or less, and a majority of respondents would personally like to suppress someone's vote. Welcome to Upworthy's first-ever real live actual poll of swing-state voters, in partnership with our friends at Public Policy Polling. 1. More than twice as many people think polls are more often skewed when they favor the other candidate or party. 2. 1 in 5 Americans think that if their candidate loses, either human civilization will be doomed or America will cease to be a great nation and they will move to Canada. Republicans are much more likely than Democrats to think that their guy losing will lead to the end of human civilization (19% to 11%). 3. Among all swing-state voters, Jon Stewart would just barely beat out Stephen Colbert, 33% to 31% (with 36% unsure). 4. Even after the whole chair thing. 5. ...47% to 47%. 6. 7. Boldly, 0% admitted that was the case. 8.

Part of Nature cartoon by Stuart McMillen - Recombinant Records This cartoon is heavily influenced by the books Natural Capitalism - Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins and Hunter Lovins (1999) and Mid-Course Correction - Ray Anderson (1998). It is also in the same vein as the flash animation "The Story of Stuff" by Annie Leonard, which I watched when I was about 90% of the way through the drawing process. Back to post / website.

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