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Open data

Open data
An introductory overview of Linked Open Data in the context of cultural institutions. Clear labeling of the licensing terms is a key component of Open data, and icons like the one pictured here are being used for that purpose. Overview[edit] The concept of open data is not new; but a formalized definition is relatively new—the primary such formalization being that in the Open Definition which can be summarized in the statement that "A piece of data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it — subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike."[2] Open data is often focused on non-textual material[citation needed] such as maps, genomes, connectomes, chemical compounds, mathematical and scientific formulae, medical data and practice, bioscience and biodiversity. A typical depiction of the need for open data: Creators of data often do not consider the need to state the conditions of ownership, licensing and re-use. I want my data back. See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data

Related:  OPEN DATACrime Statistics in the US

Urban Data Challenge: Zürich Overview What’s the heartbeat of your city? Does data make your pulse race? Crime Mapping and COMPSTAT LAPD Crime Mapping Get up-to-date crime statistics for neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles. Being informed about crime in your community is the first step in preventing future occurrences. go to Crime Mapping> To view only the crimes reported by the Los Angeles Police Department: Click on the Crime Mapping Agencies tab, then click the drop down arrow in the Only show crime reported by window and select Los Angeles Police, CA, and then click the Agencies tab again to maximize the page view. The Los Angeles Police Department will directly feed its crime data to the Omega Group to ensure that each crime is reported accurately on the site. The records themselves are also put through an exclusive data scrubbing process that works to locate each crime incident geographically, to a hundred block. A link to the crime maps can be found at www.lapdonline.org, and by clicking on Crimemapping in the left navigation.

Open Data Portal 0 Have you ever wondered… which of Europe’s countries has the greenest energy supply? Or which of its economies are growing fastest? Or which organisations are lobbying the EU? Or how EU public funds are being spent? The Impact of Opening Up Crime Data Many cities in the U.S. release crime data, but how much information is available and how it's released varies greatly. Although there are more static tables with crime stats posted on websites than we’d like to count, there are also plenty of examples of decently structured data releases that form the foundation for informative and creative uses of crime data -- raising the bar for what is possible. All around the country, journalists, developers, and many other groups are transforming public crime data into meaningful stories, apps, data visualizations, and more, responding to the high demand for access to and better understanding of this information.

Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is a specific sourcing model in which individuals or organizations use contributions from Internet users to obtain needed services or ideas. Definitions[edit] The term "crowdsourcing" was coined in 2005 by Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson, editors at Wired, to describe how businesses were using the Internet to "outsource work to the crowd",[1] which quickly led to the portmanteau "crowdsourcing." Howe first published a definition for the term crowdsourcing in a companion blog post to his June 2006 Wired article, "The Rise of Crowdsourcing", which came out in print just days later:[11] "Simply defined, crowdsourcing represents the act of a company or institution taking a function once performed by employees and outsourcing it to an undefined (and generally large) network of people in the form of an open call. This can take the form of peer-production (when the job is performed collaboratively), but is also often undertaken by sole individuals.

Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Most publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles must pay to access them. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publisher and is often required to pay an additional fee.

FOIA Here you can learn all about FBI records—including how to find records already released and how to request unreleased records through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) or the Privacy Act. You can also find other information that will help you understand these records and the work of the FBI. See the menu to the right for hot topics and other links. Dale Dougherty Company[edit] O'Reilly Media is best known for its color-coded "Animal Books". The company began in 1978 as a private consulting firm doing technical writing, based in the Cambridge, Massachusetts area.

Rate Limiting Per User or Per Application Rate limiting in version 1.1 of the API is primarily considered on a per-user basis — or more accurately described, per access token in your control. If a method allows for 15 requests per rate limit window, then it allows you to make 15 requests per window per leveraged access token. This is similar to the way API v1 had per-user/per-access token limits when leveraging OAuth. When using application-only authentication, rate limits are determined globally for the entire application. If a method allows for 15 requests per rate limit window, then it allows you to make 15 requests per window — on behalf of your application.

Open Science Collaboration Blog · The State of Open Access by Shauna Gordon-McKeon To celebrate Open Access Week last month, we asked people four questions about the state of open access and how it's changing. Here are some in depth answers from two people working on open access: Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and the Harvard Open Access Project, and Elizabeth Silva, associate editor at the Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Public Information Requests Public Information Requests The staff of the Houston Police Department / Public Affairs Division / Open Records Unit welcomes you to our section of this web site. In order to assist you with your search on how to submit an Open Records request, we suggest that you find the type of document you are seeking in the list below, click on the heading and follow the instructions on how to obtain that document.

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