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The Scientist Magazine®

The Scientist Magazine®
Humans have spiked ecosystems with a flood of active pharmaceuticals. The drugs are feminizing male fish, confusing birds, and worrying scientists. Researchers are borrowing designs from the natural world to advance biomedicine. The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth. This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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Rwanda’s rainforest renewal : National Parks, Africa When choosing Rwanda as a holiday destination, many people are keen to see the country’s rare primates and learn about its dark past. But those who work in the tourism industry are keen to show visitors a new Rwanda. Not one that is dismissive of its history – but one that offers more than museums and gorillas. Antibody's unusual abilities might inspire vaccine strategies The antibody shows promise both for stopping E. coli from adhering to cells and for dislodging it E. coli bacteria showing the appendages used to adhere to other cells. For example, certain forms of E. coli can attached to human cells in the urinary tract to cause infection.

The Daily Galaxy - Great Discoveries Channel -Your Daily Dose of Massive Earth-like planets that have both continents and oceans may be better at harboring extraterrestrial life than those that are water-only worlds. A new study gives hope for the possibility that many super-Earth planets orbiting distant stars have exposed continents rather than just water-covered surfaces. Continue reading "SuperEarths with Exposed Continents Boost Chances for Extraterrestrial Life" » generators Charybdis is designed to simulate the production and decay of black holes in hadron collider experiments, according to theories with TeV-scale gravity and extra spatial dimensions. The production of the black hole is assumed to take place with a basically geometrical cross section. The decay then takes place via Hawking radiation using the D-dimensional grey-body factors.

Glass Jellyfish Sculpture by Richard Satava Something resembling glass vases with jellyfish inside creates glass artist Richard Satava. He has an amazing skill to create such realistic jellyfish. In simple terms, the jellyfish are also made of glass. Richard Satava spent about three years studying the technique and improving the formulas. He makes these vases with jellyfish for the past twenty years. Solar-powered sea slug harnesses stolen plant genes - life - 24 November 2008 Video: Watch a sea slug eat algae to nab some of its chloroplasts, and the genes that keep them functioning It's the ultimate form of solar power: eat a plant, become photosynthetic. Now researchers have found how one animal does just that. Elysia chlorotica is a lurid green sea slug, with a gelatinous leaf-shaped body, that lives along the Atlantic seaboard of the US.

Revealing kidney cancer's secret Tumors gain survival advantage by reprogramming their metabolism An international team of scientists, led by UC Davis nephrologist Robert Weiss, have used a sophisticated combination of proteomics and metabolomics to show how renal cell carcinoma (RCC) reprograms its metabolism and evades the immune system. In addition, the study found that cancer grade has a major impact on this reprogramming. These results, published in the journal Cancer Research, point to new therapeutic options for this particularly deadly cancer. thunderbolts of the Gods [Archive] - Cosmoquest Forum Without reading the book I cannot say much but it seems pretty far out to me. I would like to know how they try to prove this theory. Seems to me that is the planets were "looming" over us, then we would be subjected to intense gravitational tides, Radiation, dodging their moons etc.

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