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How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything - Alexis C. Madrigal

How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything - Alexis C. Madrigal
An exclusive look inside Ground Truth, the secretive program to build the world's best accurate maps. Behind every Google Map, there is a much more complex map that's the key to your queries but hidden from your view. The deep map contains the logic of places: their no-left-turns and freeway on-ramps, speed limits and traffic conditions. This is the data that you're drawing from when you ask Google to navigate you from point A to point B -- and last week, Google showed me the internal map and demonstrated how it was built. It's the first time the company has let anyone watch how the project it calls GT, or "Ground Truth," actually works. Google opened up at a key moment in its evolution. And for good reason. "If you look at the offline world, the real world in which we live, that information is not entirely online," Manik Gupta, the senior product manager for Google Maps, told me. This is not just a theoretical concern. But that would entail actually building a better map.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/how-google-builds-its-maps-and-what-it-means-for-the-future-of-everything/261913/

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YouTube Announces That It Has Hit One Billion Monthly Users, Which Is Roughly Ten Super Bowl Audiences Today, YouTube announced that it has hit a billion monthly users, which is an extremely insane metric. We know that YouTube is the go-to place for silly, interesting and important videos, but these numbers are something that even TV networks dream of. The great part for YouTube is that this means that online video ad spend will go up since the eyeballs appear to be ready, willing and able. It’s not only advertisers that are rushing YouTube, budding music artists are heading there too, and making a career from the attention that they get. Fueling this insane growth is the availability of YouTube on all devices, plus a growing interest from “Generation C,” which happens to love to curate.

Driverless car bill is signed in California at Google headquarters 26 September 2012Last updated at 07:13 ET Governor Brown arrived in one of Google's driverless vehicles A bill to bring driverless cars to roads in California has been signed. State Governor Jerry Brown backed legislation on Tuesday, and said: "Today we're looking at science-fiction becoming tomorrow's reality". The bill was signed at the headquarters of Google, which has been testing a fleet of 12 autonomous computer-controlled vehicles for several years. Google co-founder Sergey Brin said self-driving cars would be "far safer" than those driven by humans.

Two Excellent Web Tools to Easily Record and Share Audio Clips February 17, 2015 In today’s post I am sharing with you two of the best simple web tools that you can use to record audio clips. These web-based applications do not require any software installation and you are not even required to have an account to use them. They work right from your browser and they allow you to easily record or upload your audio and generate a link to share it with others. This is by far my favourite. Vocaroo enables you to record or upload audio clips . To record your voice, simple click on the record button and start talking.

Meet Mira, the Supercomputer That Makes Universes - Ross Andersen Next month, one of the world's fastest supercomputers will run the largest, most complex universe simulation ever attempted. Argonne National Laboratory Cosmology is the most ambitious of sciences. Inside the U.S. Military’s Chemical-Weapons Tests Colonel James S. Ketchum dreamed of war without killing. He joined the Army in 1956 and left it in 1976, and in that time he did not fight in Vietnam; he did not invade the Bay of Pigs; he did not guard Western Europe with tanks, or help build nuclear launch sites beneath the Arctic ice.

32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow - Interactive Feature Electric Clothes Physicists at Wake Forest University have developed a fabric that doubles as a spare outlet. When used to line your shirt — or even your pillowcase or office chair — it converts subtle differences in temperature across the span of the clothing (say, from your cuff to your armpit) into electricity. And because the different parts of your shirt can vary by about 10 degrees, you could power up your MP3 player just by sitting still. According to the fabric’s creator, David Carroll, a cellphone case lined with the material could boost the phone’s battery charge by 10 to 15 percent over eight hours, using the heat absorbed from your pants pocket.

Turntables and Cartridges History of Turntables and How They Work | History of Turntable Cartridges | Cartridges | Turntable Tools Turntable History Fairchild Tables In reproducing a phonograph record, the aim is to take out of the groove exactly the intelligence that was pressed into them. And the wiggles in the groove are meaningless in themselves. They have to induce exactly the right physical motion in a stylus before they make sense---which means that they must move under the stylus at the right speed and that the stylus itself must track the groove accurately, wigwagging as the wiggles demand.

Remembering Alan Turing Yep. Hence the name "bombe", which is not an English word. Joe Desch also led a simultaneous indedpendent effort in Dayton, Ohio, to build a bombe machine after the Germans added a fourth wheel to their enigma machine. Turing, however, was dismissive of the bombe effort at National Cash Register in Dayton, and thought it would never work. It eventually did, though Desch suffered a nervous breakdown in the process. Desch, a German, suffered from paranoia for the rest of his life over the project, as he'd been under extreme scrutiny for obvious reasons during the war.

The Amazon Effect From the start, Jeff Bezos wanted to “get big fast.” He was never a “small is beautiful” kind of guy. The Brobdingnagian numbers tell much of the story. Google gets license to test drive autonomous cars on Nevada roads On Monday, the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles approved Google’s license application to test autonomous vehicles on the state’s roads. The state had approved such laws back in February, and has now begun issuing licenses based on those regulations. The state previously outlined that companies that want to test such vehicles will need an insurance bond of $1 million and must provide detailed outlines of where they plan to test it and under what conditions. Further, the car must have two people in it at all times, with one behind the wheel who can take control of the vehicle if needed.

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