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The Flipped Classroom Defined

The Flipped Classroom Defined

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/09/the-flipped-classroom-defined/

Related:  pédagogie inverséeEducation & learningPsychology of LearningkikuyainthedarkNew Technologies: Education

Flipping over the Flipped Classroom? So the new rage in education has a label- The Flipped Classroom! There is a movement that believes that it is the perfect mix use of technology that has and will continue to transform the education of America’s students. The flipped classroom is based upon the use of technology to help deliver lessons outside of the classroom (the lesson is watched at home for homework), thus allowing students to spend class time fully focused on subject matter and the expanse of it.

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Do check it out. - C.J. The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating.

Flipped salle de classe: 5 stratégies pour Flip & Engager My blog “Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos” explored both my excitement and concerns around the flipped classroom model. Several comments and questions posted in response to that blog post asked about the strategies I use to engage students in active learning online. I want to share some of the strategies I use for engaging students around flipped content to: Stimulate higher-order thinking.Transition homework from a solitary practice to a collaborative experience.Create transparency for teachers, so they can identify what students understand, where they are struggling and what questions they have.Begin work in class at a deeper level.Cultivate a learning community online to complement face-to-face work. 1. Google Sites: Pair YouTube Embeds with Google Forms

The MOOC experiment University reflects on successes, challenges of online learning The past year-and-a-half has seen the University dive headfirst into the once-foreign frontier of online education, notably through its offering of more than a dozen massive open online courses, or MOOCs. But whether MOOCs in their current form are any indication of what the future holds for higher education is still up for debate. At what cost? Isaac Asimov on the Thrill of Lifelong Learning, Science vs. Religion, and the Role of Science Fiction in Advancing Society by Maria Popova “It’s insulting to imply that only a system of rewards and punishments can keep you a decent human being.” Isaac Asimov was an extraordinary mind and spirit — the author of more than 400 science and science fiction books and a tireless advocate of space exploration, he also took great joy in the humanities (and once annotated Lord Byron’s epic poem “Don Juan”), championed humanism over religion, and celebrated the human spirit itself (he even wrote young Carl Sagan fan mail).

Politics and the Internet This timeline was researched by Kristina Redgrave, Diane Chang, Becky Kazansky, Andrew Seo and Micah Sifry, and edited by Micah Sifry. It is a work-in-progress. If you would like to suggest an important development that we may have missed, or make a correction to the record, please [use this form]( research support provided by the Shorenstein Center at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

MOOCs: Top 10 Sites for Free Education With Elite Universities MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses. Although there has been access to free online courses on the Internet for years, the quality and quantity of courses has changed. Access to free courses has allowed students to obtain a level of education that many only could dream of in the past. Awesome Chart Comparing Traditional Versus 21st Century Learning February 4, 2015 In his classic book “Education and Experience” John Dewey talks about the dichotomy between traditional and progressive forms of education saying that such a dichotomy polarizes discussions around educational matters. Dewey, instead, argued for an experience-based model that builds on the drawbacks and strengths of both models to form a holistic conceptualization of what a student-centred education should be like. Today, as I stumbled upon this beautiful chart on Mindhsift’s Facebook page I could not help but connect it to Dewey’s discussion of experiential and progressive learning. What in the chart is labelled 21st century learner is in fact the kind of learner Dewey theorized in his work more than half a century ago.

Educational Discourse Recently I’ve been discussing with a number of educators different tools that teachers can use with students or on their own for learning, sharing, and collaboration. There are many websites that do a tremendous job of exploring different tools that teachers can access like TeachThought, freetech4teachers , edutopia, edudemics and many more. There are also many educators that have great resources for specific apps/tools like Evernote and EduClipper where you can get great information about how to use these tools in the classroom.

~synthesis~: inversions There was an article in the NY Times recently about a research study that found that students who study online outperform those that study in the classroom. But according to an email Prof. Kathy Gill at U Washington sent to a listserv, the causative factor was not on/off line, but time on task So it wasn't the medium, it wasn't the message, it was the participation level that made the difference. Learners Should Be Developing Their Own Essential Questions Having essential questions drive curriculum and learning has become core to many educators’ instructional practices. Grant Wiggins, in his work on Understanding By Design, describes an essential question as: A meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. Such questions are broad in scope and timeless by nature. They are perpetually arguable – What is justice? Is art a matter of taste or principles?

Related:  Flipped LearningFlipped ClassroomFlipped The Classroom