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Emerging technologies

Emerging technologies
An emerging technology (as distinguished from a conventional technology) is a field of technology that broaches new territory in some significant way, with new technological developments. Examples of currently emerging technologies include educational technology, information technology, nanotechnology, biotechnology, cognitive science, robotics, and artificial intelligence.[1] New technological fields may result from the technological convergence of different systems evolving towards similar goals. Convergence brings previously separate technologies such as voice (and telephony features), data (and productivity applications) and video together so that they share resources and interact with each other, creating new efficiencies. History of emerging technologies[edit] In the history of technology, emerging technologies[3][4] are contemporary advances and innovation in various fields of technology. Over centuries, innovative methods and new technologies are developed and opened up. General Related:  Emerging TechnologiesEMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

Of Time Machines and Foresight Garages: About the September-October FUTURIST One of the most frequently asked questions here at the World Future Society is How do I become a futurist? The first step, of course, is to be interested, but the second, as with any profession, is to learn the required skills. So the next question is Where? There are no better experts on this subject than futurists themselves, so we invited essays from anyone who has participated in a futures-education program—as a learner, as a teacher, or as an administrator. And we didn’t rule out self-learners! The range of approaches described in the special report in this issue is truly inspiring. It is not surprising that a very large percentage of contributions came from people who have participated in the University of Houston’s futurist-training program, including three of its leaders—Oliver Markley, Peter Bishop, and Andy Hines. The Futures Education special report is not a comprehensive survey of the foresight-learning opportunities out there. Cynthia G.

Technophilia Technophilia (from Greek τέχνη - technē, "art, skill, craft"[1] and φίλος - philos, "beloved, dear, friend"[2]) refers generally to a strong enthusiasm for technology, especially new technologies such as personal computers, the Internet, mobile phones and home cinema.[3] The term is used in sociology to examine individuals' interactions with society and is contrasted with technophobia. On a psychodynamic level, technophilia generates the expression of its opposite, technophobia.[4] Technophilia and technophobia are the two extremes of the relationship between technology and society. The technophile regards most or all technology positively, adopts new forms of technology enthusiastically and sees it as a means to improve life, whilst some may even view it as a means to combat social problems.[3] Etymology[edit] The word technophile is said to have originated in the 1960s as an "unflattering word introduced by technophobes." [6] Narcissism through technophilia[edit] See also[edit]

List of emerging technologies Agriculture[edit] Biomedical[edit] Displays[edit] Electronics[edit] Energy[edit] IT and communications[edit] Manufacturing[edit] Materials science[edit] Military[edit] Neuroscience[edit] Robotics[edit] Transport[edit] Other[edit] See also[edit] General Disruptive innovation, Industrial Ecology, List of inventors, List of inventions, Sustainable development, Technology readiness level Nano- Molecular manufacturing, Neurotechnology Bioscience Human Connectome Project Ethics Casuistry, Computer ethics, Engineering ethics, Nanoethics, Bioethics, Neuroethics, Roboethics Other Anthropogenics, Machine guidance, Radio frequency identification, National Science Foundation, Virtual reality Transport List of proposed future transport Further reading[edit] IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, & Fuertes, J. References[edit] External links[edit]

Technological Singularity The technological singularity is the hypothesis that accelerating progress in technologies will cause a runaway effect wherein artificial intelligence will exceed human intellectual capacity and control, thus radically changing civilization in an event called the singularity.[1] Because the capabilities of such an intelligence may be impossible for a human to comprehend, the technological singularity is an occurrence beyond which events may become unpredictable, unfavorable, or even unfathomable.[2] The first use of the term "singularity" in this context was by mathematician John von Neumann. Proponents of the singularity typically postulate an "intelligence explosion",[5][6] where superintelligences design successive generations of increasingly powerful minds, that might occur very quickly and might not stop until the agent's cognitive abilities greatly surpass that of any human. Basic concepts Superintelligence Non-AI singularity Intelligence explosion Exponential growth Plausibility

Weightless SIG for M2M and Internet of Things IOT How to see into the future Billions of dollars are spent on experts who claim they can forecast what’s around the corner, in business, finance and economics. Most of them get it wrong. Now a groundbreaking study has unlocked the secret: it IS possible to predict the future – and a new breed of ‘superforecasters’ knows how to do it Irving Fisher was once the most famous economist in the world. In the 1920s, Fisher had two great rivals. Fisher’s rivals fared better than he did. If Fisher and Babson could see the modern forecasting industry, it would have astonished them in its scale, range and hyperactivity. It is true that forecasting now seems ubiquitous. Real breakthroughs have been achieved in certain areas, especially where rich datasets have become available – for example, weather forecasting, online retailing and supply-chain management. So why is forecasting so difficult – and is there hope for improvement? Tetlock’s response was patient, painstaking and quietly brilliant.

Luddite The Leader of the Luddites, engraving of 1812 The Luddites were 19th-century English textile artisans who protested against newly developed labour-saving machinery from 1811 to 1817. The stocking frames, spinning frames and power looms introduced during the Industrial Revolution threatened to replace the artisans with less-skilled, low-wage labourers, leaving them without work. Although the origin of the name Luddite (/ˈlʌd.aɪt/) is uncertain, a popular theory is that the movement was named after Ned Ludd, a youth who allegedly smashed two stocking frames in 1779, and whose name had become emblematic of machine destroyers.[1][2][3] The name evolved into the imaginary General Ludd or King Ludd, a figure who, like Robin Hood, was reputed to live in Sherwood Forest.[4][a] Background[edit] The movement can be seen as part of a rising tide of English working-class discontent in the early 19th century. History[edit] Luddite acts 1811-1813[edit] Isolated incidents post 1814[edit] See also[edit]

ICT Research & Innovation It generates 25% of total business expenditure in Research and Development (R&D), and investments in ICT account for 50% of all European productivity growth. EU investments in ICTs are due to increase by about 25% under Horizon 2020 compared to FP7. This EU investment will support the whole chain from basic research to innovation that can deliver new business breakthroughs, often on the basis of emerging technologies. Information and Communication Technologies underpin innovation and competitiveness across private and public sectors and enable scientific progress in all disciplines. Thus in H2020, ICT-related topics can be found in all priorities, from 'Excellence Science' to 'Industrial Leadership', to 'Societal Challenges'. 'Excellent science' research will cover the radically new technological possibilities through the 'Future and Emerging Technologies', including FET Flagships, and the 'European research infrastructures' ('eInfrastructures').

100+ Sites to Download All Sorts of Things These days you can find all sorts of things online, from audio books to flash files, from sound effects to CSS templates. Below we compiled a list with over 100 download sites that serve that purpose. We will also try to keep the list updated, so if your favorite download site is not here, let us know about it with a comment. Audio Books Librivox: One of the most popular audio libraries on the web. Podiobooks: Similar to podcast, Podiobooks are serialized audiobooks that are distributed through RSS feeds. Oculture (Audio & Podcast): Offers a rich array of educational and cultural media. Learn Out Loud: A one-stop destination for video and audio learning resources. BitTorrent The Pirate Bay: The web’s largest collection of bit torrent trackers. Mininova.org : What started as an alternative to the now defunct Supernova that went offline in 2004, Mininova has become the biggest torrent search engine and directory on the web. Books and Documents eBooks Ebookee: A free book search engine. Clipart

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