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An Interactive Infographic Maps The Future Of Emerging Technology

An Interactive Infographic Maps The Future Of Emerging Technology
Can speculation about the future of technology serve as a measuring stick for what we create today? That’s the idea behind Envisioning Technology's massive infographic (PDF), which maps the future of emerging technologies on a loose timeline between now and 2040. Click to enlarge. On it you’ll find predictions about everything from artificial intelligence and robotics to geoengineering and energy. In 30 years, it will also be a great reference for where we thought we might end up. You can download a PDF for free, or--should you want to track our progress toward artificial photosynthesis and space-based solar power by X-ing out accomplishments on your wall--purchase a poster version here. Related:  Art & Technology

Data Mining Image: Detail of sliced visualization of thirty video samples of Downfall remixes. See actual visualization below. As part of my post doctoral research for The Department of Information Science and Media Studies at the University of Bergen, Norway, I am using cultural analytics techniques to analyze YouTube video remixes. The following is an excerpt from an upcoming paper titled, “Modular Complexity and Remix: The Collapse of Time and Space into Search,” to be published in the peer review journal AnthroVision, Vol 1.1. The excerpt below is rather extensive for a blog post, but I find it necessary to share it in order to bring together elements discussed in previous posts on Remix and Cultural Analytics (see part 1 on the Charleston Mix, part 2 on Radiohead’s Lotus Flower, and part 3 on the Downfall parodies). The following excerpt references sliced visualizations of the three cases studies in order to analyze the patterns of remixing videos on YouTube.

How Do You Create A Culture Of Innovation? This is the third part in a series by Scott Anthony, author of The Little Black Book Of Innovation. It sounds so seductive: a “culture of innovation.” The three words immediately conjure up images of innovation savants like 3M, Pixar, Apple, and Google--the sorts of places where innovation isn’t an unnatural act, but part of the very fabric of a company. While culture is a complicated cocktail, four ingredients propel an organization forward: the right people, appropriate rewards and incentives, a common language, and leadership role-modeling. The Innovator’s DNA Has Four Components If you ask most people what makes a great innovator, the most common response is innate gifts from parents or a higher power. At the core is what the professors call “associational thinking.” Questioning: Asking probing questions that impose or remove constraints. Most organizations have people who follow these behaviors--even if they aren’t immediately obvious to senior leadership. Then it dawned on me.

Developing an Entrepreneurial Mindset: Culture of Curiosity, Shared Language and Motivation | Entrepreneur the Arts The last class of The IAE’s first module just finished yesterday. For the entire past three months we have been exploring who we are, how we communicate, how our lives are constructed and what matters most to us. In our classroom we have been learning how to develop a culture of curiosity, shared language, increase our recognition of patterns, and explore what triggers our own motivation- all essential ingredients to begin to develop an entrepreneurial mindset. A great deal of our learning has been done through experiences of the learning. Artists learn best this way. And while I had never, until I conceived the IAE, attempted to construct as much of the curriculum as possible in this way, it is highly impact filled and TOTALLY worth all of the effort to create. At the end of each weekend of class we synthesize our learning. Here is our final learning wall for the end of our 1st module of class. In the end, what matters is not what we know.

With mobile tech, mapping a city’s emotions, memories PHILADELPHIA -- What can technologies do for us to help us understand what's going on in the city? University of Pennsylvania urban planning professor Amy Hillier took to the stage here at the second annual TEDxPhilly conference on Tuesday to demonstrate how technology could one day help us look beyond statistics to visualize the very experience of a city. "Could we map emotion? Memory? Today's geographic information system, or GIS, technology allows us to map the visible city -- streets, sidewalks, buildings -- that we see when we walk around. "Once upon a time, this was magnificent," Hillier said. But what does the city look like beneath the surface? "The city I'm interested in is the city we don't see," Hillier said. But the third step, arguably the most important, is the one that no one can see but everyone can feel: the societal impact of those other layers. "Neighborhoods shape us, and we also shape our neighborhoods," she said. How does race or income affect your opportunities?

Breakthrough Nanotechnology Will Bring 100 Terabyte 3.5-inch Digital Data... Have you ever dream of 100 terabyte of data per 3.5-inch disk? New patented innovation nanotechnology from Michael E. Thomas, president of Colossal Storage Corporation, makes it real. Michael invented and patented the world's first and only concept for non-contact UV photon induced electric field poling of ferroelectric non-linear photonic bandgap crystals, which offers the possibility of controlling and manipulating light within a UV/Deep Blue frequency of 1 nm to 400 nm. It took him 14 years to find a practical conceptualization that would work to advance the storage industry; 3D Volume Holographic Optical Storage Nanotechnology, for which Michael holds the patents. • Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook! This invention and patents on a technique for changing matter at the molecular level is one of the World's only new enabling technologies, having many hundreds of electro-optic applications. “In 1974 I was making 5 Megabyte disk packs - the biggest at that time in the world.

Japanese Scientists Create Touchable Holograms // Current To Our Faithful Current.com Users: Current's run has ended after eight exciting years on air and online. The Current TV staff has appreciated your interest, support, participation and unflagging loyalty over the years. Your contributions helped make Current.com a vibrant place for discussing thousands of interesting stories, and your continued viewership motivated us to keep innovating and find new ways to reflect the voice of the people. We now welcome the on-air and digital presence of Al Jazeera America, a new news network committed to reporting on and investigating real stories affecting the lives of everyday Americans in every corner of the country. Thank you for inspiring and challenging us. – The Current TV Staff

Nanowire battery can hold 10 times the charge of existing lithium-ion battery Stanford Report, December 18, 2007 Courtesy Nature Nanotechnology Photos taken by a scanning electron microscope of silicon nanowires before (left) and after (right) absorbing lithium. Both photos were taken at the same magnification. The work is described in “High-performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires,” published online Dec. 16 in Nature Nanotechnology. Stanford researchers have found a way to use silicon nanowires to reinvent the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that power laptops, iPods, video cameras, cell phones, and countless other devices. The new technology, developed through research led by Yi Cui, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, produces 10 times the amount of electricity of existing lithium-ion, known as Li-ion, batteries. "It's not a small improvement," Cui said. The greatly expanded storage capacity could make Li-ion batteries attractive to electric car manufacturers. Cui's battery gets around this problem with nanotechnology.

Predator takes visual object tracking to new heights – Computer Chips & Hardware Technology Cameras have slowly made their way into the portable gadgets we all carry around with us and not having a camera in a new device is viewed as a missing feature. It’s got to the point now where the latest smartphones even have two cameras so as to make for better video chat. But while the prevalence and quality of the cameras has gone up, the software still lags behind in terms of being able to identify and track objects in any real-time or captured footage. That is about to change due to the work of Czech student Zdeneki Kalai. Working on his Ph.D at the University of Surrey he has created a new visual object tracking algorithm called Predator that blows away everything that has come before it in the consumer-space at least. This algorithm not only tracks, it learns the more it gets used. Kalai believes what he has created, a combination of tracking, learning, and detection is completely unique and allows for a whole new set of functionality to be applied when looking at video feeds.

iRing - The first motion controller for all your music apps and more Take Control Now control your music apps and effects without touching your device with the iRing™ touchless controller for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. The new iRing uses hand gestures to control parameters of effects and other items in your music apps, allowing you to create stunning and dramatic music in an incredibly fun way by simply moving your hands in front of your device. iRing uses patented advanced image-recognition, motion control and precise geometric positioning technology to give you control of assignable parameters within your apps. Making music and creating killer real time effects for nonstop dance music and grooves is now easy and as simple as moving your hands… something you probably already do. The ABCs of XYZ Okay, so how does this thing work? Pretty slick, huh? Okay, but in practical terms… Let’s say for instance you want to control an audio effect. The Engine: iRing FX/Control App Music Judo What you get *Legal detail | Warranty

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