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InfoGraphic Designs: Overview, Examples and Best Practices Information graphics or infographics are visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics are used where complex information needs to be explained quickly and clearly, such as in signs, maps, journalism, technical writing, and education. They are also used extensively as tools by computer scientists, mathematicians, and statisticians to ease the process of developing and communicating conceptual information. They can present a rich amount of information without intimidating you. Or sometimes they intimidate you, but make the digesting of the information much more bearable. Here in this article below, we are going to discuss best practices for designing infographics followed by some examples which might help you learn a thing or two. You may be interested in the following related articles as well. Feel free to join us and you are always welcome to share your thoughts that our readers may find helpful. Don’t forget to and follow us on Twitter — for recent updates. 01.

IBM has developed a new carbon nanotube based chip making technology IBM researcher Hongsik Park looks over wafer with carbon nanotubes. Researchers at International Business Machines‘ T.J. Watson Research Center in New York have made a new technology breakthrough that will help us keep transistors, the basic build blocks of our technology-infused world, getting smaller and more powerful. Why is this important? Carbon nanotubes represent a new class of semiconductor materials whose electrical properties are more attractive than silicon, particularly for building nanoscale transistor devices that are a few tens of atoms across. Last year, IBM showed carbon nanotube transistors that can work much like silicon transistors and suggested that there would be five to ten times improvement in performance compared to silicon.

Google Scholar Spider web's strength lies in more than its silk While researchers have long known of the incredible strength of spider silk, the robust nature of the tiny filaments cannot alone explain how webs survive multiple tears and winds that exceed hurricane strength. Now, a study that combines experimental observations of spider webs with complex computer simulations shows that web durability depends not only on silk strength, but on how the overall web design compensates for damage and the response of individual strands to continuously varying stresses. Reporting in the cover story of the Feb. 2, 2012, issue of Nature, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Politecnico di Torino in Italy show how spider web-design localizes strain and damage, preserving the web as a whole. "Multiple research groups have investigated the complex, hierarchical structure of spider silk and its amazing strength, extensibility and toughness," says Markus Buehler, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at MIT.

Web Development and Marketing Solutions ~ nonlinear creations Open Science, H1N1, Processing, and the Google Spreadsheet API I’ve recently been working on a project with my friend Jennifer Gardy, whose insights into epidemiology and data modeling led me to build Just Landed. Jennifer is currently working at the BC Centre for Disease Control where, among other things, she’s been looking at data related to swine flu genomics. She came to me with an interesting idea for visualizing data related to historical flu strains, and I thought it might be an interesting project for several reasons. First, I’ve been doing a lot of reading and thinking around the concept of open science and open research, and thought that this project might be a good chance to test out some ideas. The project is just getting started, so I don’t have a lot of results to share (a screenshot of the initial stages of the tool is above). Michael Nielson is the author of the most cited physics publication of the last 25 years. For the flu genomics project, we are working with a reasonably large data set – about 38,000 data points.

IBM prepares for end of process shrinks with carbon nanotube transistors The shrinking size of features on modern processors is slowly approaching a limit where the wiring on chips will only be a few atoms across. As this point approaches, both making these features and controlling the flow of current through them becomes a serious challenge, one that bumps up against basic limits of materials. During my visit to IBM's Watson Research Center, it was clear that people in the company are already thinking about what to do when they run into these limits. During my visit to Watson, I spoke with George Tulevski, who is working on the nanotube project, and is one of the authors of the recent paper. One possible alternative is to use graphene, a sheet of carbon a bit like an unrolled nanotube, which can potentially be etched into distinct features. This still left IBM with a choice, Tulevski said. So, Tulevski's group is taking a different approach: buy off-the-shelf nanotubes, isolate the ones they want, and then assemble them on a chip.

TEL Rap music powers rhythmic action of medical sensor The driving bass rhythm of rap music can be harnessed to power a new type of miniature medical sensor designed to be implanted in the body. Acoustic waves from music, particularly rap, were found to effectively recharge the pressure sensor. Such a device might ultimately help to treat people stricken with aneurisms or incontinence due to paralysis. The heart of the sensor is a vibrating cantilever, a thin beam attached at one end like a miniature diving board. "The music reaches the correct frequency only at certain times, for example, when there is a strong bass component," he said. When the frequency falls outside of the proper range, the cantilever stops vibrating, automatically sending the electrical charge to the sensor, which takes a pressure reading and transmits data as radio signals. "You would only need to do this for a couple of minutes every hour or so to monitor either blood pressure or pressure of urine in the bladder," Ziaie said.

TopQuadrant The Anatomy Of An Infographic: 5 Steps To Create A Powerful Visual Information is very powerful but for the most bit it is bland and unimaginative. Infographics channel information in a visually pleasing, instantly understandable manner, making it not only powerful, but extremely beautiful. Once used predominantly to make maps more approachable, scientific charts less daunting and as key learning tools for children, inforgraphics have now permeated all aspects of the modern world. I designed a couple of infographics back in college, the need arising especially around the time Soccer World Cup fever spiked. It was a fun process representing the different groups, predicting winners in each group at each stage and creating a mock pairing of teams that would clash all the way leading upto the finals. Infographics can appear daunting to some with the sheer amount of data they present, but designed in the right manner and step by step, they can actually be one of the most fun things you will ever create. Anatomy Of An Infographic 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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