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Joshua Foer: Feats of memory anyone can do

Joshua Foer: Feats of memory anyone can do

http://www.ted.com/talks/joshua_foer_feats_of_memory_anyone_can_do.html

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speakers who disagree with each other TED2013 kicks off in just 11 days. And, in the very first session, Robert J. Gordon and Erik Brynjolfsson will ascend the stage for a debate on the future of work. While Gordon will focus on how our current ecosystem of innovation is too focused on personal gadgetry, and thus isn’t setting us up to solve the big problems of the future, Brynjolfsson will express the view that the digital revolution is propelling us forward rapidly, giving us a good foundation for future prosperity. It’s shaping up to be a fascinating discussion — one that may well change your mind.

The Science of "Chunking," Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity by Maria Popova “Generating interesting connections between disparate subjects is what makes art so fascinating to create and to view… We are forced to contemplate a new, higher pattern that binds lower ones together.” It seems to be the season for fascinating meditations on consciousness, exploring such questions as what happens while we sleep, how complex cognition evolved, and why the world exists. Joining them and prior explorations of what it means to be human is The Ravenous Brain: How the New Science of Consciousness Explains Our Insatiable Search for Meaning (public library) by Cambridge neuroscientist Daniel Bor in which, among other things, he sheds light on how our species’ penchant for pattern-recognition is essential to consciousness and our entire experience of life.

An overview of the recognition primed decision making model What is it? In 1985 Gary Klein and others began to develop the recognition primed decision making model. They were studying decision making in the army and were examining how fire fighting chiefs make decisions. They realized that these expert decision-makers were not comparing lists of options. Scan Reveals Brain’s Structure To Be Much Simpler Than We Thought Peering into the brain with a scanner of unprecedented resolution, scientists discovered that the basic structure of neuronal networks was a simple, three-dimensional grid. More than any other part of the brain, the cerebral cortex makes us human. Through the electrical activity of the neuronal networks packed into the brain’s undulating outer surface we sense our environment, use and understand language, and separate good and evil. So, then, the biologist’s mantra, “form follows function,” means that when we learn about brain structure, we learn about our very nature. Last March a team of scientists used a new and powerful scanner to peer into the cerebral cortex and other underlying structures with an unprecedented level of resolution.

Brain Pickings 09 MAY, 2013By: Maria Popova “When the profit motive gets unmoored from the purpose motive, bad things happen.” The question of how to avoid meaningless labor and instead find fulfilling work brimming with a sense of purpose is an enduring but, for many, elusive cultural ideal. Daniel Pink tackles the conundrum in this wonderful animation by the RSA — who have previously sketch-noted such fascinating pieces of cultural psychology as the truth about dishonesty, the power of introverts, where good ideas come from, what’s wrong with the left-brain/right-brain dichotomy, the broken industrial model of education, and how choice limits social change — based on his book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (public library). Pink shares the counterintuitive results of two studies that reveal the inner workings of what influences our behavior — and the half-truth of why money can’t buy us satisfaction:

Mental block: Professor discovers way to alter memory June 4, 2013 — A series of studies conducted by an Iowa State University research team shows that it is possible to manipulate an existing memory simply by suggesting new or different information. The key is timing and recall of that memory, said Jason Chan, an assistant professor of psychology at Iowa State. "If you reactivate a memory by retrieving it, that memory becomes susceptible to changes again. And if at that time you give people new contradictory information, that can make the original memory much harder to retrieve later," Chan said. One of the major findings from the studies, published in the latest issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , is the impact on declarative memory -- a memory that can be consciously recalled and verbally described, such as what you did last weekend.

Category mistake A category mistake, or category error, is a semantic or ontological error in which "things of one kind are presented as if they belonged to another",[1] or, alternatively, a property is ascribed to a thing that could not possibly have that property. Thomas Szasz argued that minds are not the sort of things that can be said to be diseased or ill because they belong to the wrong category and that "illness" is a term that can only be ascribed to things like the body; saying that the mind is ill is a misuse of words. Another example is the metaphor "time crawled", which if taken literally is not just false but a category mistake.

No More Skipping Your Medicine – FDA Approves First Digital Pill Approved by the FDA, a sand-sized chip sends a signal via cell phone to doctors to let them know when and if medication was taken. The Food and Drug Administration has just approved a device that is integrated into pills and let’s doctors know when patients take their medicine – and when they don’t. Adherence to prescriptions is a serious problem, as about half of all patients don’t take medications the way they’re supposed to. But with patients doctors now becoming big brother, that statistic could change drastically. The device, made by Proteus Digital Health, is a silicon chip about the size of a sand particle. With no battery and no sensor, it is powered by the body itself.

Greenberg Educational Consulting Organization Education should be a process and time of unfettered learning and exploration, but all too often it is bogged down with too many rules, short-sighted narrow focus, and a lack of inspired leadership. Education defines our society and if we want a humane and egalitarian society, we need leaders and members who all strive for the depth of knowledge, skill, compassion and wisdom that is achievable through simple daily practice and regular critical review. Because daily efforts require time, energy, and motivation and there is a lot of noise in society I am building this site to help you find and use ideas worth using. To help us all upgrade our mentality, wisdom, skill (add your goals here), what I’m working to build here is a site that works like a college education should – providing Exposure to people you haven’t met yet, ideas you haven’t heard yet and ways of thinking, arguing, and behaving that you haven’t done yet.

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